Saturday 21 April 2018
(Bloomberg 12/20/13)
Huambo is emerging from the ruins left by a 27-year civil war in Angola, Africa’s second-biggest oil producer, by using a new power plant, a location on the transnational Benguela railway and a temperate climate to lure investors. Angola’s second-largest city, located on the central plateau about 600 kilometers (373 miles) southeast of the capital, Luanda, is linked to the Atlantic ocean port of Lobito and neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo and Zambia by the 1,344-kilometer Benguela railway that China has rebuilt. It’s receiving fresh supplies of power from the 60-megawatt Gove hydroelectric dam that was completed in August. Because Huambo is mainly inhabited by ethnic Ovimbundu, who formed the base of support for Jonas Savimbi’s National Union for the...
(Voice of America 12/20/13)
DAKAR — African militaries want surveillance drones to help them patrol their borders and vast open spaces, but engineers and entrepreneurs say unmanned aerial vehicles could do so much more than just track the bad guys. They could deliver medicines, protect endangered species, and drive economic growth, with cargo drones moving goods quickly and cheaply. But some experts warn that opening up civilian air space to drones, even for such purportedly "good" uses, could create problems in the long run. Kenyan engineer James Munyoki has built several drones. His latest prototype can carry 6 kilograms. He is working on getting that up to 10. "When I started building them, I was thinking the payload would be something like a camera...
(The New York Times 12/20/13)
JERUSALEM — Some arrived here on Tuesday in sturdy walking boots donated by local aid organizations; others came less equipped for the leftover snow on the ground, wearing sandals and house slippers. They held placards bearing slogans like “Refugees but not criminals” and a verse invoking a biblical injunction against oppressing the stranger because “you were strangers in the land of Egypt.” The roughly 200 asylum seekers from Sudan and Eritrea came to protest their treatment by the Israeli authorities, finishing a two-day journey. On Sunday they left a new “open” detention facility where they were being held in the Negev desert and walked for about six hours to Beersheba, the nearest city. They spent the night in the bus...
(The Observer 12/20/13)
An estimated 500 people are now said to have been killed in the sporadic fighting that started on Sunday and has been described as a coup attempt. What is most worrying is that the ethnic dimension of the conflict is beginning to rear its ugly head with reports of ethnic-inspired massacres. A civil war might well be imminent if nothing is done quickly to restore sanity. With thousands of Ugandans working or doing business in South Sudan, Uganda is directly affected by these negative developments. Not only are Ugandans among those killed, many Ugandan traders are counting their losses. Besides, the resulting humanitarian situation could see refugees pouring across the border. It is, therefore, in Uganda's interest to have a...
(Reuters (Eng) 12/20/13)
JUBA (Reuters) - South Sudanese government troops battled to regain control of a flashpoint town and sent forces to quell fighting in a vital oil producing area on Thursday, the fifth day of a conflict that has deepened ethnic divisions in the two-year-old nation. The conflict, which has so far killed up to 500 people, has alarmed South Sudan's neighbors. African mediators held talks with President Salva Kiir on Thursday to try to broker peace, and U.S. President Barak Obama urged the clashing factions to stop fighting. The clashes that erupted around the capital Juba on Sunday night have quickly spread, pitting loyalists of the former Vice President Riek Machar, a Nuer, against Kiir, a member of the dominant Dinka...
(Voice of America 12/20/13)
Scientists say climate change will not affect all regions of the world equally – especially when it comes to fresh water. The latest computer models indicate some places will get a lot less, while others get a lot more. Dr. Jacob Schewe and his colleagues say that “water scarcity is a major threat for human development” if greenhouse gas emissions remain unchecked. They’ve published their findings in a special issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “The reason we’re concerned is that it’s a very important issue for a lot of people. We all depend on water for so many different purposes. And water scarcity, where it exists, really impairs many things that people do and that...
(Bloomberg 12/19/13)
Banco Sabadell SA (SAB) plans to open 25 more branches in Angola over the next two years as the Spanish bank targets the growing ranks of the wealthy in Africa’s second-largest oil producer. Banco Privado Atlantico SA will invest 4.4 billion kwanza ($45 million) adding to its tally of 42 branches, Carlos Silva, chief executive officer of the Angolan unit of Spain’s fifth-biggest lender, said yesterday in an e-mailed response to questions. “We intend to consolidate the bank’s position in high-value segments such as investment, corporate and private banking, together with strengthening its involvement in infrastructure projects of the Angolan economy,” Silva said. Next year will see “continued enlargement in the affluent and emerging affluent market segments,” he said. A...
(Reuters (Eng) 12/19/13)
ADDIS ABABA Wed(Reuters) - A group of East African foreign ministers will travel to South Sudan on Thursday to seek an end to days of fighting, the first foreign mission to enter the country since the eruption of the conflict that has killed up to 500 people. Clashes between rival groups of soldiers started in the capital Juba late on Sunday and spread on Wednesday to the flashpoint town of Bor, scene of an ethnic massacre in 1991, raising fears of a slide into civil war. South Sudan's President Salva Kiir has accused his sacked deputy Riek Machar of starting the fighting and trying to launch a coup, charges denied by Machar. Kiir said on Wednesday he was ready for...
(Angola Press 12/18/13)
Luanda - Onze nouveaux commissariats et postes de Police ont été inaugurés mardi dans la capitale angolaise par le commandant général de la corporation, Ambrósio de Lemos. Selon la source, il s’agit des postes de Zango 1 (Viana), Tanque Serra (municipalité de Belas), Cassequel de terra vermelha (district urbain de Maianga), Bita Progresso (Viana), Monte Belo (Cacuaco), de bairro seis (Viana), de Vila da Mata (Cazenga), ainsi que le poste policier de la ville de Luanda au quartier vila Flor. Outre ces postes, il a aussi été inauguré le commissariat de Kala Wenda à Cazenga, au quartier Pedreira, municipalité de Cacuaco et le poste policier de Terra Nova (district urbain de Rangel).
(Voice of America 12/18/13)
Dakar — Researchers working with the African Development Bank say that African countries have lost as much as $1.4 trillion in cash leakages over the last 30 years. Much of the lost money is a result of illicit cash flows and corruption, and continues to hinder development in the region. The amount of illicit cash flowing out of Africa has nearly doubled over the past three decades. Illicit cash flows refer to funds leaving a country through irregular means, often to skirt local taxes. This can range from a foreign business underreporting its earnings in an African country and then funneling revenue into offshore accounts, corrupt officials embezzling state funds and tucking them away overseas, or organized crime groups just...
(Daily Observer 12/18/13)
Lawmakers on Monday unanimously adopted the Report on the 3rd Ordinary Session of the Pan-African Parliament (PAP) during the latter's October session in South Africa. The Report looked at issues relating to enhanced African integration with a view to expediting development vis-à-vis Agenda 2063 adopted by the authority of heads of state during the 50th anniversary of the formation of the Organisation of African Unity/Africa Union. The Report challenged African parliamentarians to play a key role in the continent's integration through sensitisations and dialogue, putting in place legislations for sustainable development in all aspects. Tabling the report before lawmakers, Hon. Bintanding Jarjue of Foni Berefet, informed that the session explored women's rights and violence against women. She said it also...
(Voice of America 12/18/13)
WASHINGTON — About two-thirds of the 8,400 French troops involved in foreign operations are based in Africa, primarily in Mali and the Central African Republic. Meanwhile, French President Francois Hollande said recently that he wants his country to double its trade to Africa over the next five years. Together, the developments could indicate the former colonial power in Africa is again trying to bolster its influence on the continent. France has carried out more than 10 major military interventions on the African continent since the early 1990s, in countries including Chad, Ivory Coast and Libya. This year, France gained international attention for its leading role in intervening in the crisis in Mali and now the Central African Republic. Peter Pham,...
(UKzambians 12/18/13)
TUNIS, Tunisia, December / — The African Development Bank (AfDB) ( http://www.afdb.org ) and the Government of Japan signed on Monday, 16 December, a bilateral Exchange of Notes for a loan of 9.48 billion Japanese yen (about US$ 100 million). This is the fourth loan to the Bank under the Enhanced Private Sector Assistance (EPSA) for Africa Initiative, which supports entrepreneurship, job creation and economic growth in Africa. The Exchange of Notes was signed by Dr. Donald Kaberuka, AfDB President, and His Excellency Mr. Juichi Takahara, Ambassador of Japan to Tunisia. mmediately following the signature of the Exchange of Notes, the relevant Loan Agreement between the AfDB and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) was signed by Mr. Charles Boamah,...
(Reuters (Eng) 12/17/13)
JERUSALEM---(Reuters) - More than 100 African migrants have abandoned an "open" Israeli detention center to try to march on Jerusalem in protest at a law allowing authorities to keep them in custody indefinitely, activists said on Monday. Israel views most of the more than 50,000 Sudanese and Eritrean migrants who have crossed its border on foot from Egypt since 2006 as illegal job-seekers overburdening its low-income areas. It has sought to encourage most of them to leave. Many migrants say they are fleeing persecution, forced military conscription or dictatorship in African countries. The center in southern Israel was opened last week after parliamentary approval of a law allowing the open-ended detention of migrants in the facility pending resolution of their...
(BBC News Africa 12/17/13)
The world should be paying more attention to the sub-Saharan threat from al-Qaeda, a former head of the British armed forces has warned. General Sir David Richards said Britain needed to learn from what it had done "and failed to do". He also questioned whether the Nato operation against Libya in 2011 was the right thing to do, suggesting it may have contributed to the spread of arms in the region. In the past year Islamist groups of stepped up their activities in several African countries. In Somalia, African Union troops have been battling with militants al-Shabab - which came to global prominence with its attack on a Kenyan shopping centre earlier this year. French troops spearheaded the response to...
( 12/17/13)
Cape Town — Are you taking antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and want to know how well you're doing? If you live in a wealthy country, chances are that your progress is regularly checked using the "gold standard" - a viral load test. If you're in a developing country, where more people are on ARV medication and the need is greater, the expensive and complex test is hard to find, making it even more difficult to monitor whether your treatment is failing and you need to change your medication. But as the number of people receiving HIV treatment rises, and more people become eligible for treatment, the prohibitive cost of viral load tests will have to come down, and donors should use...
(Voice of America 12/17/13)
Washington — The developing world needs huge sums of money to address its many problems with health, housing, education, and more. A new report says corrupt practices by multinational companies, their government enablers, and others, however, are depriving people of a better life. A financial watchdog group, Washington-based Global Financial Integrity [GFI], reports astounding sums of money are extracted every year from African, Asian, and Latin American nations. GFI's new report says that in 2011, some $947 billion was taken out of these countries through what it calls illicit capital outflows. GFI Director Raymond Baker said the 10-year total is even more staggering. "Over the decade from 2002 to 2011, we're talking about $5.9 trillion that have moved out of...
(Daily Maverick 12/17/13)
As usual, this year threw up its fair share of bad news, disasters and controversies. SIMON ALLISON explains the stories that have him most worried for the continent's future. There was nothing wrong with the Kenyan elections, aside from a few inconsequential quibbles. They were generally considered free and fair, and turnout was excellent (88.6%). The problem came with the result: with a range of candidates to choose from, the majority of Kenyans plumped for the duo of Uhuru Kenyatta and William Ruto - two men united by little except their base pragmatism and their shared experience of being charged with crimes against humanity by the world's top court. The pair's shared infamy comes from their alleged involvement in the...
(Voice of America 12/16/13)
QUNU, SOUTH AFRICA — South Africa’s first black president, anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela, has been buried in his home village near Qunu, in Eastern Cape Province. Several thousand family members and close friends attended the funeral. Nelson Mandela was laid to rest Sunday among the hills of his ancestral homeland, eulogized by friends, family and admirers. His longtime friend, Ahmed Kathrada, called Mandela his older brother and moved the 4,500 participants with memories from the decades of struggle against apartheid and prison."The last time I saw Madiba alive was when I visited him in hospital. I was filled with an overwhelming sadness and emotion and I cried. He held my hand and it was profoundly heart-breaking and it brought out...
(CNN 12/16/13)
(CNN) -- With the passing of Nelson Mandela it might be timely to put aside out-of-date and ill-informed views of Africa, and see it the way Africans seem to: With a high level of optimism. Two-thirds of respondents to a CNN survey of more than 9,000 people across South Africa and 19 other African countries say they feel more confident about the future than when Mandela came to power. Corruption tops their list of fears -- particularly in Nigeria -- but generally they believe their leaders are "doing their best." The survey, conducted on smartphones, PCs and web-enabled feature phones, was an attempt to give a sense of the mood of Africans about their future and Mandela's legacy. It suggests...

Pages