| Africatime
Monday 27 March 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 11/02/16)
South Africa's dams could take up to five years to recover even if the country experiences normal rainfall following a severe drought, authorities said on Tuesday, increasing the prospects of water rationing. Southern Africa has been affected by a severe drought that has prompted water restrictions by various municipalities, which have warned that water could be rationed if consumers do not heed calls to cut consumption. "We predict that it will take anything from two to three years and even up to five years to recover from the drought we have just come through," said the department of Water and Sanitations deputy director general Trevor Blazer. Blazer said only about 8 percent of rainfall water is captured in dams, with...
(AFP (eng) 11/02/16)
Stopping the killing of elephants for their tusks could add some $25 million (23 million euros) to Africa's annual tourism income, more than offsetting the anti-poaching spend, a study said Tuesday. While the figure pales in comparison to the estimated value of the black market ivory trade in China, it represents about a fifth of tourist income for game parks in 14 countries, where half of Africa's elephants are located, the study said. "We find that the lost economic benefits that elephants could deliver to African countries via tourism are substantial, and that these benefits exceed the costs necessary to halt elephant declines in east, southern and west Africa," the authors wrote in the journal Nature Communications. The conservation of...
(AFP (eng) 10/31/16)
Angolan state-owned oil company Sonangol rode the commodities boom that drove the country's extraordinary growth after civil war ended in 2002, but today it symbolises a national economic crisis. The Luanda-based company has increasingly been in focus since Isabel dos Santos, the billionaire daughter of long-time President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, was appointed CEO in June. She vowed to improve transparency and efficiency at the company, a secretive behemoth that has played a dominant role in many parts of Angolan life in the post-war years. Concerns over the company's health have increased in recent months, with reports claiming to shed some light on Sonangol's alleged struggles to pay its bills and stay afloat. Maka Angola, a website close to opposition...
(Macauhub 10/31/16)
The Angolan economy should post average growth of 2.9 percent during the period from 2017 to 2021, compared to the rate of 4.1 percent during the period from 2012 thru 2016, the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) affirms in its latest report on Angola. The EIU forecasts growth of just 0.6 percent this year, adding that the economy will recover in 2017 with a rate of 3.0 percent, increasing to 3.5 percent in 2018 and then wavering between 2.8 percent and 2.5 percent in the following three years. Public revenue should remain weak due to the continuing slump in oil prices on international markets. The EIU expects budget execution to present a deficit that should average 4.4 percent during the 2017-2021...
(Macauhub 10/31/16)
Angola should extract nearly 60,000 cubic metres of ornamental stone and export 35,000 cubic metres by the end of this year, said Geology and Mines Minister Francisco Queiroz in Luanda. Forecasts also indicate that 65,000 cubic metres will be extracted in 2017, of which 38,000 cubic metres will be exported, Queiroz added in his speech to participants in the Geoformando seminar for journalists and opinion-makers. The ornamental stone subsector currently counts 14 operational companies, which should be joined by 9 more this year, reports Angop news agency. Pig iron projects in Cassinga and in Cuando Cubango province should get under way by 2018 and produce 1.7 million tons of iron ore, the minister stated. Other projects involve iron ore projects...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/31/16)
About 220 African migrants forced their way through a barbed wire fence into Spain's North African enclave of Ceuta on Monday, clashing with Spanish police who tried to prevent them from crossing the border with Morocco. Thirty-two migrants were treated in hospital for minor injuries after pushing their way through two gates just before 2 a.m. ET, while three Spanish policemen also needed medical attention, the government said. Several migrants collapsed from exhaustion after crossing into Spanish territory, Reuters photographs showed. Their legal status in Spain has yet to be determined, and police were searching for some who fled into hills inside the territory, it said. Spain's two enclaves in Morocco, Ceuta and Melilla, have been favored entry points into...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/29/16)
By Michelle Nichols | UNITED NATIONS United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon expressed regret on Friday that South Africa, Burundi and Gambia want to leave the International Criminal Court and said it could "send a wrong message on these countries' commitment to justice." The International Criminal Court, which opened in July 2002 and has 124 member states, is the first legal body with permanent international jurisdiction to prosecute genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. South Africa and Burundi have officially notified the United Nations of their intent to withdraw from the Rome Statute, the 1998 treaty establishing The Hague-based court, which will take effect in October 2017. Gambia said this week that it also plans to withdraw from the court,...
(AFP (eng) 10/28/16)
The impact of the most severe drought to hit southern Africa in 35 years is expected to worsen in the coming months, a UN climate envoy warned Friday. "The crisis has yet to peak," Macharia Kamau, special envoy on El Nino and climate, said at the end of a four-day trip to Mozambique. The devastation, which has affected some 18 million people across the southern African region, will be at its worst around January next year, he said. Mozambique, with 1.5 million people reeling from the drought, is one of the worst-hit countries, along with Zimbabwe, Malawi, Lesotho and southern Madagascar.
(Cnbc Africa 10/28/16)
The World Bank recently released the Doing Business 2016/17 report. The survey tracks a set of regulatory indicators related to business start-up, operation, trade, payment of taxes and closure, by measuring the time and cost associated with various government requirements. However, the index does not track variables such as macroeconomic policy, currency volatility (an extremely important factor in many emerging market countries) or crime rates, which are also important in investment decisions. According to the most recent rankings, New Zealand has the most accommodative business environment globally, having overtaken Singapore since the previous report. From an African perspective, Mauritius has maintained its title as the most accommodative business environment on the continent followed by Rwanda, Morocco, Botswana and South Africa...
(AFP (eng) 10/27/16)
Complex diverse political agendas are driving African nations to quit the International Criminal Court, with leaders seeking to cloak the move by reigniting age-old anger at the West, analysts say. Gambia's announcement that it would be the third country to withdraw from the court is all the more frustrating as it comes at a time when the tribunal is beginning to probe some of the world's most intractable conflicts, in places such as the Palestinian territories and Afghanistan, experts say. Set up in 2002, the ICC's mission is to try the world's most heinous crimes which national governments are either unable or unwilling to prosecute. And most of the ICC prosecutions, such as in the Democratic Republic of the Congo,...
(AFP (eng) 10/26/16)
A group of Angolan lawyers has filed a landmark petition challenging veteran leader Eduardo dos Santos's nomination of his daughter, Africa's richest woman, as the head of the national oil company. Isabel dos Santos was named head of troubled oil firm Sonangol in June in a move that some analysts see as the first sign of succession plans for Angola's iron-fisted ruler. "The Supreme Court has accepted our suit and it's a very important step. It is the first time that the court will examine a decision of the president," said David Mendes, a spokesman for 12 lawyers who filed the petition. "The law stipulates that public officials cannot nominate or allow the nomination of family members," he told AFP...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/26/16)
Angola's Supreme Court has asked President José Eduardo dos Santos to respond to an inquiry on why he appointed his daughter as head of the state oil firm, according to court documents seen by Reuters. Dos Santos appointed his billionaire daughter Isabel as chief executive of state oil firm Sonangol in June. She has pledged an overhaul of Sonangol to improve its efficiency and margins to offset the impact of depressed oil prices. Angola, a member of OPEC, is currently Africa's largest oil producer because of militant attacks and other problems that have cut output in Nigeria. But it has been hard hit by depressed oil prices that have forced it to slash spending and growth forecasts. The court was...
(Citizen Digital 10/26/16)
Deputy President William Ruto has arrived in Luanda, Angola for the United Nations Great Lakes Peace Security and Cooperation Summit. The plane carrying DP Ruto and his delegation touched down at Quatro de Fevereiro International Airport in Luanda, shortly before 4am ahead of the 7th High Level Regional Oversight Mechanism for Peace, Security and Cooperation. The summit will focus on levels of implementation of commitments under the Peace, Security and Cooperation framework for Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi and South Sudan. This is the first time the high level regional meeting is being held outside the African Union and the United Nations General Assembly. “Impressed by the progress of peace talks between warring factions in the Central African Republic (CAR)...
(Angola Press(En) 10/26/16)
The minister of Foreign Affairs, Georges Chikoti, said on Monday in Luanda that the actions of the International Criminal Court (ICC) has been targeting more the African states or personalities or less strong regions. In this regard, the minister spoke of the intention of the withdrawal of South Africa, Namibia, Kenya and many other African countries that also intend to abandon the ICC as it has proven to be a court focused only to condemn African or less strong countries . The minister, who was speaking to the Angolan Public Television (TPA) in "Grande Entrevista" programme, highlighted that it is not very good from the law point of view. "For example, if we look at the case of President Laurent...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/26/16)
African states unhappy with the International Criminal Court(ICC) should work to reform it from within rather than pulling out, Botswanan foreign minister Pelomoni Venson-Moitoi, a candidate to become the next African Union (AU) chief, said. With the AU increasingly divided over the ICC, South Africa announced last week that it planned to quit, but Venson-Moitoi said she believed an African war crimes court could be beefed up to work alongside its Hague-based counterpart. Although South Africa argued that the ICC's Rome Statutes were at odds with its laws granting leaders diplomatic immunity, other African countries see the tribunal purely as an instrument of colonial justice that unfairly targets the continent. "I don't see why we should be pulling out. The...
(Daily Nation 10/25/16)
President Uhuru Kenyatta has cancelled his official visit to Angola to deal with the terrorist attack in Mandera, State House spokesman Manoah Esipisu has said. In a statement on Tuesday evening, Mr Esipisu said the President had called off the visit in solidarity with the families who lost their loved ones and those injured. “The President condemns in the strongest terms this heinous attack by these depraved individuals. Our security agencies will do everything in their power to bring them to justice,” said the statement. “Every Kenyan of goodwill, Christian and Muslim alike, knows that it is wrong to take innocent life. Kenyans will not allow themselves to be divided along religious lines, which is what the terrorists want,” said...
(AFP (eng) 10/25/16)
The International Criminal Court on Monday urged member states to seek a consensus with critical African nations, while stressing that South Africa and Burundi's announced departures would not take place for at least year. "Today more than ever, there is a huge need for universal justice," said Sidiki Kaba, president of the assembly of state parties to the ICC founding treaty, evoking "the tragedies which are happening in front of our eyes". Kaba, also Senegal's justice minister, said it was necessary "to engage in dialogue with the nations which want to leave the ICC. For that we must listen to their concerns, their recriminations and their criticism". South Africa dealt a heavy blow to the troubled international court on Friday...
(APA 10/24/16)
Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta is expected to join other leaders from the sub-region in a regional summit on security to be held on Wednesday in Luanda, the capital, APA learns here Monday. The High-Level Regional Oversight Mechanism for Peace and Security Cooperation summit comes at a time when Africa is facing insecurity in various countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo. “The region is vital to the security and safety of the continent at large, and the President expects that an amicable solution to preserve the region’s stability will be agreed in short order,” said a statement issued in Nairobi Monday. Burundi and South Sudan also still present serious security and humanitarian problems and it is expected that Kenyatta...
(This Day Live 10/24/16)
The London Stock Exchange (LSE) has provided $26.1 billion for African companies in the last 10 years, the Chief Executive Officer of the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE), Mr. Oscar Onyema has said. Onyema disclosed this while speaking at the third “London & Lagos Capital Markets in Partnership’ conference held at the LSE at the weekend. According to him, eight Nigerian companies were among those that benefitted from the international capital raising on the LSE, noting that more African companies (112) are listed in London than any other international exchange. The 112 companies, he said, have a combined market capitalisation in excess of $200 billion, the largest concentration of African quoted companies outside of Johannesburg. Out of these companies, eight companies...
(AFP (eng) 10/21/16)
Demand for homegrown contemporary music is sweeping Africa and driving a creative boom in an industry otherwise battered by falling CD sales and rampant piracy. A recent study of the entertainment sector by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) accountants showed rapid earnings growth in many African countries, fuelled largely by live performances by local artists. "Consumers are increasingly wanting local content," Vicki Myburgh, a PwC director who conducted the study released last month, told AFP. "The Nigerian music market... will (soon) grow at nearly 13 percent annually, which is a fantastic rate." This weekend, African talent will be celebrated in Johannesburg at the annual MTV Africa awards set up in 2008 to recognise those "who have made the most impact on African music...

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