Monday 26 June 2017
(Tanzania Daily News 09/20/13)
Bukoba — IN strengthening their economic ties, three countries, namely Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi have signed a MoU. The Minister for Energy and Minerals, Prof Sospeter Muhongo, Rwandan Minister for Infrastructure, Prof Silas Rwakabamba and Burundi Minister for Energy and Mines, Mr Manilakiza Cone, on Tuesday signed the contract which would help implementation of the Regional Rusumo Falls Hydro-electric project to cost 340 million US dollars. The objective of the Regional Rusumo Falls Hydroelectric Project is to increase power supply of electricity to the national grids of Burundi, Rwanda, and Tanzania. The project will strengthen the capacity of the Nile Equatorial Lakes Subsidiary Action Programme (NELSAP) and its emergence as a regional centre of excellence. The project's regional approach to...
(BBC News Africa 09/20/13)
The African Union has called a special summit to discuss a mass withdrawal from the International Criminal Court (ICC) in protest at the trial of Kenya's Deputy President William Ruto. A letter sent to the ICC signed by African leaders says Mr Ruto's presence in The Hague will disadvantage Kenya. The AU has previously accused the ICC of "hunting" African leaders and ignoring atrocities elsewhere. The ICC says it is standing up for victims of crimes wherever they are. The extraordinary summit will be held in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, on 13 October. Days before the start of Mr Ruto's trial this month, Kenya's parliament voted to leave the ICC. This decision will not affect the trial of Mr...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/20/13)
DAKAR | Fri Sep 20, 2013 (Reuters) - The United States and its allies are clamping down on suspected Hezbollah activity in West Africa, which Washington says is a major source of cash for the Lebanese group as its patron Iran feels the pinch of sanctions. The push coincides with Hezbollah's deepening role in Syria, where it has dispatched thousands of fighters to back President Bashar al-Assad. It also comes in the wake of attacks outside Lebanon linked to Hezbollah that Western experts say are part of global campaign that could soon include Africa. Critics, however, argue that Washington and its allies may be exaggerating the threat and failing to distinguish between different forms of support for various elements of...
(CNN 09/20/13)
London (CNN) -- The girls strutting down the runway in The Savoy Hotel share many features - all are long-limbed, fine-boned and have glowing complexions. A silent army marching to the heavy music, past the front row A-listers peering out from behind their dark glasses. But one girl is different: the only one with black skin in a battalion of white faces. Nadja is one of the few black models lucky enough to make this year's cut for London Fashion Week. The lack of racial diversity in the fashion industry is a serious issue that needs to be tackled, according to supermodels Naomi Campbell and Iman, who this month launched a campaign to raise awareness of racism in the industry...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/19/13)
ADDIS ABABA | Thu Sep 19, 2013 (Reuters) - African leaders will meet in the Ethiopian capital on October 13 to take a common stance on whether to join Kenya's planned pull-out from the International Criminal Court (ICC) over the prosecution of its leaders, officials said on Thursday. So far there does not seem to be much support for it, but heads of state from the 54-member African Union (AU) may still discuss the possibility of a pullout by the 34 African signatories to the Rome Statute that created the tribunal. Last week's start of the trial of Kenyan Deputy President William Ruto for crimes against humanity - with President Uhuru Kenyatta's trial due in November - has fuelled a...
(AFP (eng) 09/19/13)
NADOR, September 19, 2013 (AFP) - In a forest overlooking the Spanish enclave of Melilla, Diamani nurses fresh wounds from his latest desperate bid, along with hundreds of other African migrants, to scale the heavily guarded border fence. He describes being attacked by Moroccan security forces, who he says fired rubber bullets and hurled rocks. "I managed to get past them, but then cut my leg as I was climbing over the fence," adds the 27-year-old from Gao in northern Mali, showing a bloody gash on his bandaged left leg. Sheltering in the Gourougou forest in northern Morocco, hundreds of fortune seekers like him get ready for the night, the lights of Melilla tantalisingly visible below, less than two kilometres...
(The Wall Street Journal 09/18/13)
When residents sang and danced in this town's dusty streets in August to celebrate the self-declared birth of their new nation, Zambia's police pounced. On Tuesday, 59 people arrested in the sweep appeared at a court in Mongu, located on the marshy banks of the Zambezi River, charged with treason. Many were picked up in the past few weeks for their alleged involvement in a ceremony to select a new regional administrator who would organize elections for a newly independent government. It was the latest sign of separatism taking hold in Africa—both peacefully and violently. Some of the jailed activists now call themselves citizens of Barotseland, a kingdom that before Zambia's independence in 1964 was a British protectorate. When the...
( 09/18/13)
(IRIN) - This year, the two most powerful men on the globe, presidents Barack Obama and Xi Jinping, both embarked on Africa tours, pledging to increase aid and investment and work with the continent to improve development. While this was Barack Obama's first extended tour of Africa since taking office (he made a one-day stop in 2009 in Ghana), Chinese leaders have been visiting the continent regularly for decades, quietly working on joint development, trade, foreign direct investment and assistance projects. "China is the largest developing country in the world, and Africa is the continent with the largest number of developing countries," Jiang Zemin, then-president of China, said in his opening remarks at the first Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC)...
(The Guardian 09/17/13)
Safe and Inclusive Cities initiative will compare existing approaches as part of drive to tackle urban conflict. Urban violence in 40 cities in sub-Saharan Africa, south Asia, and Latin America will be investigated as part of an ambitious Canadian-British funded research project. The initiative will seek to understand the complex causes of urban violence and find practical solutions. The $11m (£6.7m) Safe and Inclusive Cities initiative, funded by Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and Britain's Department for International Development (DfID), will provide 15 research teams with grants of up to $500,000 each. "Top experts from around the world will analyse the effectiveness of violence prevention strategies and identify successful concrete examples," said John de Boer, a programme leader at...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/16/13)
JERUSALEM | Mon Sep 16, 2013 (Reuters) - Israel's supreme court on Monday struck down a year-old law that meant African migrants could be held in detention for up three years without charge. The law, that came into force in June last year, was meant to deter illegal immigration but was condemned by human rights campaigners as a harsh and illegal way of treating people, especially those fleeing persecution and seeking asylum. A right-wing lawmaker said the court's ruling risked damaging the character of Israel - a state built on Jewish immigration - by opening the door to more Africans. Chief Justice Asher Grunis said the law contradicted Israel's legal guarantees of basic democratic freedoms, and "therefore, it ought to...
(Financial Times 09/15/13)
Future unrest is likely in sub-Saharan Africa if jobs cannot be created for the continent’s growing numbers of young people, the EU’s development chief has warned. Andris Piebalgs, European Commissioner for Development, said Africa contained the world’s greatest social problems. “The magnitude of the problem is immense and the challenges facing sub-Saharan African countries are huge,” he said in an interview with the Financial Times, adding that the region’s population is growing rapidly and half were under 25 years old. Mr Piebalgs, who spoke last week at an international youth job creation summit in London, said sub-Saharan Africa’s relatively low youth unemployment rate of 3 per cent, compared with the 50 per cent in some European countries, disguised the scale...
(The Globe and Mail 09/14/13)
When one of South Africa’s biggest newspaper chains was sold last month, an odd name was buried in the list of new owners: China International Television Corp. A major stake in a South African newspaper group might seem an unusual acquisition for Chinese state television, but it was no mystery to anyone who has watched the rapid expansion of China’s media empire across Africa. From newspapers and magazines to satellite television and radio stations, China is investing heavily in African media. It’s part of a long-term campaign to bolster Beijing’s “soft power” – not just through diplomacy, but also through foreign aid, business links, scholarships, training programs, academic institutes and the media. Its investments have allowed China to promote its...
(National Post 09/14/13)
Africa’s population will more than double to 2.4 billion within 40 years, thanks in large part to better health care, according to a major study. Sub-Saharan Africa’s population is rising faster than the rest of the world because modern medicine and health care on the continent means more babies are surviving birth complications, and fewer adults are dying from preventable diseases. But the number of children being conceived is not dropping, or is doing so very slowly. “This means that population growth rates would naturally rise if birth rates stay as they are,” said Carl Haub, the co-author of the report by the U.S.-based Population Reference Bureau. African mothers currently give birth to an average of 5.2 children, rising to...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/13/13)
BUJUMBURA | Fri Sep 13, 2013 (Reuters) - Burundi has opened an investigation into claims that a former ethnic Hutu rebel leader ordered the massacre of Congolese refugees in an attack almost a decade ago, its prosecutor's office said on Friday. The Banyamulenge, an ethnic Tutsi tribe from neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo, in August accused Agathon Rwasa of ordering the killing of 166 Banyamulenge seeking refuge inside a camp in Burundi in 2004. Rwasa, who led the FNL (National Liberation Forces) during Burundi's civil war, denies involvement in the slaughter and said the probe was politically motivated, aimed at hampering his bid to run for the presidency for a second time in 2015. "This is a way of keeping...
(Voice of America 09/13/13)
GENEVA — A new report says the number of global deaths among children under age five is almost half what it was 22 years ago. A joint report by the United Nations Children’s Fund, the World Health Organization,and World Bank finds about 6.6 million children died before reaching their fifth birthday in 2012 compared to 12 million children who died in 1990. The report calls the progress being made in cutting child deaths remarkable. However, it says this is still not good enough. It says most child deaths are preventable, and that by applying a number of simple, affordable measures, more children’s lives can be saved. Elizabeth Mason, director of the World Health Organization's department of maternal, newborn, child and...
(Voice of America 09/13/13)
NAIROBI, KENYA — In Africa, demand for the cassava plant has grown significantly over the years. The continent produces 60 percent of the crop in the world. But the crop is drastically declining in East and Central Africa due to diseases that reduce production. More than 160 million people in east, central and southern Africa depend on cassava as a stable food and a source of income. Production of the crop has significantly dropped due to the cassava mosaic and cassava brown streak diseases. According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO], the brown streak disease is worse since it affects the root of the crop. These two diseases are creating havoc in Africa’s agricultural lands.Improvements necessary. The acting...
(Dw-World 09/12/13)
If German Chancellor Angela Merkel were standing for election in Africa in September, she would have a good chance of winning. But it's not all praise for Merkel and the German government. If it were up to the Mozambicans who were once contract workers in the former East Germany or "GDR", Chancellor Angela Merkel and her Christian Democratic Union (CDU) would win the upcoming elections. Germany goes to the polls on September 22, 2013. The Mozambican returnees, known as "Madgermanes", are convinced Merkel strengthened the German economy and successfully steered her country through the turmoil of the financial crisis. "Germany has remained Europe's largest economy under the Merkel government, even the global financial crisis did not affect it that badly,"...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/12/13)
JOHANNESBURG, Sept 12 | (Reuters) - Africa's robust economic growth over the past decade has raised hopes the world's poorest continent can reduce reliance on aid. The problem with this scenario is its failure to consider the role aid may be playing in the "Africa Rising" narrative. Looking for a link between aid and growth, an unmistakable pattern emerges from the numbers. World Bank data shows foreign donor aid to Africa from the OECD group of wealthy countries was just under $13 billion in 2000 and soared to $41 billion in 2006, and then slipped, before rebounding and hitting over $46 billion in 2011. Net official development assistance per capita was just $19.50 in 2000 and almost tripled to a...
(AFP (eng) 09/12/13)
Bujumbura - At least 25 000 Burundian refugees living in Tanzania have been forcibly repatriated over the past month, a UN official said on Thursday, describing a “dramatic” humanitarian situation. Close to a million refugees fled from Burundi to stable Tanzania when civil war broke out in 1993, and most returned voluntarily after the conflict in their country ended in 2006. But patience appears to have run out in Tanzania, which has hosted millions of refugees over the past decades from conflicts across Africa's Great Lakes region, and authorities have been accelerating expulsions of refugees from Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Tanzania views the refugees as illegal immigrants. “It's difficult to estimate exactly the number of Burundians...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/12/13)
LONDON | Thu Sep 12, 2013 (Reuters) - BlackRock's exchange-traded funds (ETFs) business iShares has appointed a new fixed income chief in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) as it steps up efforts to meet growing demand for index-tracking bond investments in the region. iShares has appointed Brett Olson, former managing director of Nomura's asset backed securities sales team in EMEA, to lead its burgeoning fixed income product development, sales and capital markets teams. Olson will report to Tom Fekete, who recently joined iShares as head of product development for EMEA and David Heike, Global Head of Fixed Income iShares. "Fixed income ETFs have gathered strong assets over the last three years, but we're now seeing a revolution in demand...

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