Friday 23 February 2018
(Voice of America 12/03/13)
JOHANNESBURG — In most African countries, pharmaceutal drugs are poorly regulated or not regulated at all, posing huge risks for those who depend on them to stay healthy. But for the first time, the topic has gotten the attention of African officials, who holding a scientific conference on the topic in South Africa. Access to safe and effective medicine can be touch and go in Africa, where the market abounds with drugs that are fake or expired. That can have disastrous consequences, says Margareth Ndomondo-Sigonda, a Tanzanian who oversees pharmaceutical issues for an African Union agency, the New Partnership for Africa's Development, or NEPAD. "The situation that you see in Africa is that most of the medicines circulating in our...
(African arguments 12/03/13)
The McKinsey Global Institute has released a new report entitled 'Lions Go Digital: The Internet's Transformative Potential in Africa'. Optimistic about the power of internet to change Africa, the report delineates six categories where internet will have the most powerful impact: Financial services, education, health, retail, agriculture, and government. The research found that while currently, internet penetration throughout the whole continent is 16 per cent, with just 16 million people online; the report estimates that by 2025, around 50 per cent of the population will be online, with 600 million people using internet. While the figures show a hopeful projection of what internet access will look like in a little over a decade, there are clear challenges to achieving internet...
(Voice of America 12/02/13)
YAOUNDE, CAMEROON — A visiting joint International Monetary Fund/World Bank delegation says high levels of corruption have left the populations of Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon and Gabon out of the benefits of their nations’ huge petroleum resources. Economic growth in the six-nation Central African Economic and monetary community, CEMAC, has stagnated at 2.2 percent this year, 50 percent less than the 4.4 percent forecast made by the regional Bank of Central African States. A joint IMF/World Bank inspection mission left Cameroon during the weekend. Its leader, Mario De Zamaroczy, said such a mediocre economic performance has made the CEMAC zone one of the poorest in the world. “It is not sufficient to reduce poverty. The revenue was below expectations and...
(The Reporter 12/02/13)
The economic performance of Africa in the last few years has been remarkable. The continent has consistently defied the global trend. Five years after the global financial system came perilously close to collapse, the global economic outlook is still uncertain. In Europe, GDP is still below pre-crisis levels and unemployment is at a record high. Recovery in the United States, although stronger, remains weak by historic standards, and even China, which has done so much to drive global growth, is slowing down. Yet, in what some might call an unexpected twist, average growth in Africa over the last decade has been more than 5 percent. Of the 10 fastest-growing global economies, seven are in sub-Saharan Africa. But how will this...
(BBC News Africa 12/02/13)
The winner of this year's BBC African Footballer of the Year award will be revealed at 1735 GMT on Monday. The shortlist of Yaya Toure, Victor Moses, John Mikel Obi, Jonathan Pitroipa and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang was announced three weeks ago. African football fans selected their choice for the award, voting online and by text messages. You can find out result later today live on the BBC's Focus on Africa radio and television programmes and on this website. No player on this year's shortlist, drawn up from votes by 44 journalists across Africa, has won the BBC award before and two - Burkina Faso's Pitroipa and Aubameyang of Gabon - are the first nominees from their respective countries. Ivory Coast's Toure...
(The New York Times 12/01/13)
LONDON — The imagery is likely to be the same as it has been for decades — foreign troops in battle fatigues lugging backpacks and assault rifles, confronting mayhem. But when French soldiers reinforce their small existing garrison in the Central African Republic in coming weeks, their presence will probably be depicted as a departure from a long tradition of military muscle as the prime instrument of postcolonial power. The Central African Republic — its territory larger than metropolitan France, with only a small fraction of its population — has occupied an anomalous place since independence from Paris in 1960, ruled by a procession of despots and even an emperor — Bokassa I — who was accused not just of...
(AFP 11/30/13)
JOHANNESBURG, November 30, 2013 (AFP) - African ministers and experts meet next week in Botswana to chart ways to stamp out a spike in elephant killings fuelled by a growing demand for ivory in Asia. "Poaching of elephants and associated ivory trafficking remain of grave concern," said Richard Thomas, spokesman for the animal conservation group Traffic. The three-day meeting opening on Monday in Gaborone has been organised by the Botswana government and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Poaching has risen sharply in Africa in recent years and the illegal ivory trade has tripled since 1998, according to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Large-scale seizures of ivory destined for Asia have more than doubled since 2009 and...
(Voice of America 11/29/13)
CAPE TOWN — East Africa's oil rush is spreading into parks and protected areas, prompting companies to develop new ways to explore for hydrocarbons without disturbing wildlife and natural treasures such as rare fossils. From Uganda, where France's Total is trying new and less intrusive methods of seismic testing in a national park, to Madagascar, where operations are under way next to a UNESCO site, the industry is working in locations where damage would trigger public outcries. “We can't take anything for granted. We are abutting next to a UNESCO National Park,” said Stewart Ahmed, chief executive officer of Madagascar Oil, which plans the first commercial crude oil production in the impoverished Indian Ocean island state.“We are going to be...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/29/13)
PRISTINA (Reuters) - NATO confirmed on Thursday that France plans to withdraw its 320 troops from Kosovo, citing commitments in Mali and a pending French intervention in Central African Republic. Speaking in Kosovo, NATO's top military commander, U.S. Air Force General Philip Breedlove, did not specify when the troops would leave or whether they would be replaced. France is preparing to increase its force in Central African Republic, an anarchic former French colony, to at least 1,000 soldiers to prevent sectarian violence from destabilizing the wider region. In January, French military forces intervened in Mali, another ex-colony, to reverse an Islamist militant takeover of the north. Around 2,800 French soldiers remain in the West African country. "The French took a...
(Voice of America 11/29/13)
Researchers say a new strain of HIV found in West Africa leads to faster development of AIDS. Scientists based at Sweden's Lund University say the new strain, known as A3/O2, is a cross between the two most common strains in the nation of Guinea-Bissau. Their study found people infected with the new strain develop AIDS in about five years, more than a year faster than people with one of the initial strains alone. They say people with A3/02 are also three times more likely to develop AIDS and suffer an AIDS-related death. The university says that so far, the new strain has been identified only in West Africa. But it notes that around the globe, other strains are combining, raising...
(Voice of America 11/28/13)
YAOUNDE — Cameroonians are returning to traditional methods of transporting and packaging food after the government banned the production, sale and use of non-biodegradable plastic bags. People are now using large plantain leaves to store food - a move that has sparked mixed reactions among consumers and restaurateurs. It is early morning in Mfou on the outskirts of Cameroon's capital, Yaounde. Nka Pamela, a 26-year-old woman, is visiting a farm to buy plantain leaves. This has been part of her routine ever since the government banned the importation, possession, sale and use of non-biodegradable plastic bags. People have until April to use up all the bags already in circulation. Pamela said demand for leaves has skyrocketed and led to scarcity...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/28/13)
AMSTERDAM/NEW YORK---(Reuters) - The International Criminal Court's member states on Wednesday agreed to changes to the court's trial procedures that could help defuse tensions between the court and the African continent regarding the approaching trial of Kenya's president. The changes approved by the court's 122 members will make it easier for suspects to participate in trial proceedings via video link and create a special exemption for top government officials, Western diplomats said. Kenya and its African Union allies have been lobbying hard for the trial of Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta to be halted or postponed, saying the case threatens to destabilize the East African region. Kenyatta and his deputy, former political rival William Ruto, face charges of crimes against humanity...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/28/13)
Warsaw — For the past 20 years, negotiations on how to combat and adapt to climate change have been led by environmental ministers. But the decisions made affect a country's agriculture, energy and finance systems as well. Now, experts say, it's time for other players to be involved in the process, particularly when it comes to deciding how to most effectively spend available funds. "It is now clear that for effective implementation of projects under climate change finance, the environment, agriculture, energy and finance sectors must work as a team," said Ayalneh Bogale, the advisor for climate change and agriculture for the African Union Commission. At the just-ended UN climate negotiations in Warsaw, developed countries agreed to contribute $100 million...
( 11/28/13)
Kisumu/Kampala — Even as food insecurity continues to afflict impoverished and disaster-affected populations around the continent, African policymakers and consumers remain deeply divided over the potential harms and benefits of genetically modified (GM) foods, which advocates say could greatly improve yields and nutrition. A recent study published in the journal Food Policy, titled Status of development, regulation and adoption of GM agriculture in Africa, shows that heated debates over safety concerns continue to plague efforts to use GM crop technology to tackle food security problems and poverty. Yet results from the four African countries that have implemented commercial GM agriculture - Burkina Faso, Egypt, South Africa and Sudan - suggest an improvement in productivity. In South Africa, a 2008 study...
(Bloomberg 11/27/13)
Common vitamins plus selenium slowed illness in HIV patients in the early stage of their disease, according to a study suggesting the supplements may provide an effective, low-cost approach for delaying AIDS. Patients taking a daily combination of vitamins B, C and E along with selenium for two years were able to delay their need for antiretroviral therapies by about half compared with those given a placebo, according to research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study followed 878 HIV-infected adults from Botswana, a nation with one of the highest rates of infection of the AIDS virus. The findings are the first to show that vitamins and selenium can postpone illness in newly diagnosed HIV patients...
(Voice of America 11/27/13)
Douala — A few decades ago, rice was a luxury for rural Africa, a dish reserved for the big occasions like Christmas. The grain is now one of the most consumed staples south of the Sahara and experts predict surging urbanization will drive more demand for the cereal as consumer tastes increasingly tilt towards easy-to-cook convenience foods. Across Africa, rice currently knows no social or class boundaries. Increasingly, the grain ranks high on the menus of both rural and urban households. One consumer on the streets of Douala said, "I often buy a bag of rice for the family that will last about a month." Another added, "Three days out of seven, we eat rice at home. Sometimes, it's up...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/26/13)
ACCRA Tue Nov 26, 2013(Reuters) - Pan-African lender Ecobank has sued a top executive who left the company this month, naming him in a civil complaint in Togo as the author of an anonymous email accusing Chief Executive Thierry Tanoh of mismanagement. The executive, David Lawson, denied to Ecobank that he wrote the email and said he had been unfairly dismissed. He accused Ecobank executives including Tanoh of hacking his phone and email account in a fruitless search for evidence against him. The company denies wrongdoing. The row comes as Ecobank tries to shore up confidence in its governance after a Nigerian industry watchdog began investigating the way it reported financial results. The bank's chairman quit last month, saying it...
(Awoko 11/26/13)
All over the world we all think and believe that democracy, as a model of governance development and statecraft, is the best. Granted. Now wait don’t throw your argument right in my face yet! There was this story about our Salone Independence Talks in the Queen’s land way out there at Lancaster House. A paramount chief representative put up his hands and asked this question: When will it end? At the time everybody looked perturbed and ended up laughing at what they thought was a ludicrous question asked out of sheer naivety. Well 52 years on, I am actually asking the question: When will democracy end? Definitely when all the tenets of Democracy are never realized, we will be looking...
(Daily Maverick 11/26/13)
A recent discussion on South Africa's Talk Radio 702 put the practice of eating human placenta on the table (ahem). Whilst there are reports of some people doing it out of curiosity, a host of new mothers say they choose to eat their placenta for health reasons, claiming it speeds their recovery, increases milk production and prevents postnatal depression. Placenta pizza anyone? This was the initial gist of a discussion hosted by Jenny Crwys-Williams on South Africa’s Talk Radio 702 last week. Crwys-Williams read an account by new father and writer for Lifehacker Australia, Chris Jager, who cooked his wife’s placenta and then topped his pizza with it. He did this “for the express purpose” of writing an article about...
(Voice of America 11/26/13)
LONDON — Progress in the battle against AIDS is widely divergent in different African countries, so much so that to talk about “AIDS in Africa” as one epidemic needing a single approach has become an anachronism, campaigners said on Tuesday. In an analysis of the state of the global fight against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS, the advocacy group ONE said that while some African countries had reached a “tipping point” against the disease, others lag far behind. More than 35 million people worldwide are infected with HIV, which causes AIDS. Of that 35 million, 25 million are in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet within Africa, rates of HIV and AIDS vary widely. “Our analysis shows major distinctions between leaders...

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