| Africatime
Sunday 23 April 2017
(AFP (eng) 02/28/17)
The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership -- the world's biggest individual prize -- drew a blank once again in finding a suitable laureate, it was announced Tuesday. The prize only goes to a democratically-elected African leader who demonstrated exceptional leadership, served their mandated term and left office within the last three years. The award comes with $5 million (4.7 million euros) paid over 10 years and $200,000 annually for life from then on. The prize, founded by Sudan-born telecoms tycoon Mo Ibrahim, has only been given four times in its 10-year existence. The philanthropist has said in the past that making no award sent just as strong a message on African leadership. "A very high bar was deliberately...
(AFP (eng) 02/27/17)
An African road movie about four women wowed its audience Sunday as it kicked off the Panafrican cinema and television festival (Fespaco), a showcase for the continent's burgeoning film industry. "Borders" ("Frontieres") directed by Apolline Traore, a Fespaco laureate in 2013, sweeps across Africa as its protagonists journey through Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso and Benin on their way to Nigeria. Along the way the women -- Ivorian, Senegalese, Burkinabe and Nigerian actresses -- are spared nothing as they are beset by customs officers, thieves, murderers and rapists. The film -- the first feature-length film to show at the festival -- deals with "the bravery of women," Traore told AFP at the festival in the Burkinabe capital Ouagadougou. "There is a...
(AFP (eng) 02/25/17)
Homeless and hungry, Fadi is a young widow from Cameroon who was forced by Boko Haram's brutal insurgency to flee her village near the Nigerian border. But despite all she has suffered, and even in the relative safety of a camp for displaced people, she doesn't have enough food. "We just want to eat. If you can please help us," begs the 17-year-old, after barely surviving Boko Haram's violence in the Lake Chad region -- the focus of a donor conference in Norway on Friday. Fadi's husband was murdered last year in a jihadist attack on their village, Grea, near Nigeria. "They broke into our house, they killed him and they left," she said, adding that she did not know...
(AFP (eng) 02/24/17)
Donor countries meeting in Oslo on Friday pledged $672 million (634 million euros) in emergency aid for people threatened by famine in the Lake Chad region, which has been hard hit by Boko Haram, hosts Norway said. The amount was pledged over three years, and was aimed at helping 10.7 million people in need. The UN has previously said it hoped to raise $1.5 billion in 2017 for the region, which includes Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon and Chad. The United States, whose new administration has said it intends to slash its development aid budget, was not among the 14 countries that pledged money in Oslo. "The US said they would come back with their contribution, so it is not factored in"...
(Vanguard 02/24/17)
Cameroon has forcibly repatriated more than 500 Nigerians who had fled into the country due to the Boko Haram insurgency, according to the U.N. Refugee Agency (UNHCR). A total of 517 Nigerians were sent back to their home country, including 313 who had applied for asylum, according to a UNHCR statement reported by AFP. Boko Haram, a militant Islamist group that has now fragmented into two factions, took up arms against the Nigerian government in 2009. The conflict, which has spread from northeast Nigeria to other countries in the Lake Chad region, has displaced more than 2 million people. Cameroon displaced persons Cameroonian displaced people wait for food parcels at a food distribution center in Koza, in the extreme northern...
(AFP (eng) 02/23/17)
Internet has been cut for over a month in Cameroon's English-speaking regions, believed to be a record in Africa, following anti-government protests by the country's linguistic minority, a watchdog said. "Internet is completely unavailable, unless one invests in satellite material, which is extremely expensive," said Julie Owono, a lawyer for French NGO Internet Without Borders. "This has been the continent's longest blackout," she told AFP in Paris late Wednesday. English-speakers in Cameroon have long complained of discrimination and of not getting a fair share of the west African nation's wealth.
(AFP (eng) 02/23/17)
Madagascar's football boss Ahmad who is challenging the long-serving Issa Hayatou for the CAF presidency in March, wants less political interference in the African game. First elected in 1988, Cameroonian Hayatou, 70, is seeking an eighth consecutive term as head of the body that governs African football. "If people want change there is no other choice. Only I can dare (to challenge Hayatou)," Ahmad told AFP during an interview at the Madagascar Football Federation offices in Antananarivo. The mononymous Ahmad, whose single name means "the glorious" in Arabic, wants to break with Hayatou long reign, which critics
(Premium Times 02/23/17)
The Nigerian Government on Wednesday approved the construction of the Cameroon-Nigeria border link bridge as part of its efforts to strengthen the bilateral ties between the two countries. The Minister of Power, Works and Housing, Babatunde Fashola, who briefed State House Correspondents shortly after the meeting of the Federal Executive Council, FEC, presided by Acting President Yemi Osinbajo, said the construction would gulp $38 million, while $9 million would be for consultancy. “We presented a memo to construct the Cameroon-Nigeria border link bridge, at Ikot Efiom under the African Development Bank support, for improving relationship between Cameroon and Nigeria post the ICJ judgment over Bakassi; and council approved that bridge. “It’s part of the link road between Enugu -Abakaliki way...
(AL Jazeera 02/23/17)
As the humanitarian scale-up in the region continues, governments and donors are urged to do their part. On Friday, February 24, the countries of the Lake Chad region - Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria, donor governments such as Norway and Germany, the United States and the United Kingdom, and international organisations are gathering for the Oslo Humanitarian Conference on Nigeria and the Lake Chad Region. It is imperative that they all come ready with commitments to address the grave humanitarian crisis in the region - both politically and financially, 17 million lives, mostly children and women, depend on it. Boko Haram's violent conflict which broke out eight years ago in northeast Nigeria saw a horrific campaign of attacks on civilians...
(AFP (eng) 02/23/17)
For the first time in Africa, researchers said Wednesday they have detected a malaria parasite that is partially resistant to the top anti-malaria drug, artemisinin, raising concern about efforts to fight a disease that sickens hundreds of millions of people each year. The discovery means that Africa now joins southeast Asia in hosting such drug-resistant forms of the mosquito-borne disease. Malaria infected more than 200 million people and killed some 438,000 people worldwide in 2015, most of them children in Africa. "The spread of artemisinin resistance in Africa would be a major setback in the fight against malaria, as ACT (artemisinin-based combination therapy) is the only effective and widely used antimalarial treatment at the moment," said lead author Arnab Pain,...
(Xinhuanet 02/22/17)
Africa Energy Indaba, the continent's premier energy event, kicked off in Johannesburg on Monday with the aim of finding solutions to the continent's energy future. The three-day conference is being attended by the governments' representatives, business and funders. The meeting seeks to unleash the continent's potential by coming up with an energy mix to develop Africa. Dr. Garth Strachan, Deputy Director General and Head of Gas Industrialization Unit in South Africa's Department of Trade and Industry said the recent discoveries of gas in Mozambique, Angola and Tanzania provides a huge opportunity for the continent. He said there is a need for the countries to work together to tap benefits from the gas for the good of the continent. Strachan said...
(Bloomberg 02/21/17)
Ashish Thakkar, who co-founded Africa banking conglomerate Atlas Mara Ltd. with ex-Barclays Plc head Bob Diamond, lost a ruling over the ownership of family assets in a London divorce case, with a judge questioning Thakkar’s truthfulness. Judge Philip Moor ruled that Thakkar, and not his mother and sister, was the owner of disputed assets in the divorce. He found that the 35-year-old owned 100 percent of Mara Group Holdings Ltd. and other corporate entities. The result will have ramifications in the proceedings where a judge will have to decide how much Thakkar -- described in videos posted on his foundation’s website as "Africa’s Youngest Billionaire" -- is worth. Thakkar says he has assets of 445,532 pounds ($553,000) while his wife,...
(AFP (eng) 02/15/17)
Sub-Saharan Africa, where more than a half billion people live without electricity, trails the world in government policies that promote sustainable energy, according to a new World Bank report Wednesday. Much of the rest of the world, however, has made strides toward making energy broadly available, developing renewable power sources and increasing efficiency, the inaugural Regulatory Indicators for Sustainable Energy report said. In a survey of 111 countries, the World Bank found that through 2015 nearly 80 percent had begun to adopt policies to expand electrical grids, connecting them to solar and wind generation, and to help make electric utilities creditworthy and financially viable while keeping energy prices down. More than a third of countries, home to 96 percent of...
(AFP (eng) 02/14/17)
Three members of Cameroon's English-speaking opposition, which protests that the country's linguistic minority is being treated as second-class citizens, pleaded not guilty to terrorism charges at a military court on Monday. Felix Agbor Nkongho, an attorney, Neba Fontem Aforteka'a, a teacher, and Mancho Bibixy, also called "BBC", a radio host, were arrested in January and charged with conspiracy to commit "acts of terrorism, secession, revolution, insurrection" and "inciting civil war". All charges are punishable by death. More than 160 lawyers have lined up in support of the defendants.
(Reuters (Eng) 02/14/17)
The trial of three English-speaking protesters facing the death penalty opened at a military court in Cameroon on Monday in a case that has exposed national divisions and stoked opposition to Francophone President Paul Biya. Since October, people in Cameroon's two western English-speaking regions have joined protests against what they say is their marginalization by the French-speaking majority under Biya's 35-year rule. At least six protesters have been shot dead and hundreds others arrested during the rare challenge to state authority, prompting criticism from human rights groups and concern from the African Union. The three civil society figures and political activists -- Felix Agbor Balla, Fontem Aforteka'a Neba and Mancho Bibixy -- pleaded not guilty in a court in the...
(Voice of America 02/14/17)
U.S. President Donald Trump made his first phone calls to African heads of state Monday, speaking with Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari and South African President Jacob Zuma. Nigeria and South Africa said the calls were made at the request of the U.S. president, who until now has said little about Africa or African issues since assuming office last month. The Nigerian presidency said Trump and Buhari discussed issues of terrorism, and said Trump assured Buhari the United States is ready to make a new deal to help Nigeria "in terms of military weapons." The statement said Trump also commended Buhari for the strides Nigeria is making against Islamist radical group Boko Haram, and invited Buhari to come to Washington at...
(Reuters (Eng) 02/11/17)
Cameroon police killed two protestors and wounded 10 others on Friday in the latest bout of violence in the English-speaking northwest of the mostly Francophone country, police and political sources told Reuters. Protests began in November in the northwestern town of Bamenda when lawyers and teachers claimed their rights were being neglected by Cameroon's French-speaking majority. Protests have since spread. Friday's violence occurred in Ndop, about 40 kilometers to the east. Police opened fire when a crowd of about 100 people descended on the police station, demanding the release of people arrested on suspicion of setting fire to a French-speaking school on Wednesday.
(Voice of America 02/11/17)
Officials in Cameroon are calling on parents in English-speaking areas to send their children back to school, as the Central African country grapples with a continued divide over language. Schools in English-speaking areas have been closed since teachers went on strike November 21, mainly over what they and allied lawyers consider the overbearing use of French in Cameroon. In a show of sympathy for the strikers' concerns, many parents have resisted government attempts to lure students, as well as the teachers, back to class. VOA English to Africa spoke to five parents who said they were preventing their children from going to school. The parents did not want their names used for fear of reprisals. Information Minister Issa Tchiroma Bakary...
(Libération 02/10/17)
Vainqueur de la 5e Coupe d'Afrique des nations de son histoire, le Cameroun est de nouveau au sommet du football africain après une longue traversée du désert. On avait quitté les Lions sur l’île de Bioko à Malabo, capitale de la Guinée équatoriale. Une défaite face à la Côte d’Ivoire, sa deuxième en trois matchs de poule et le Cameroun sortait au premier tour de la CAN 2015 après avoir manqué les éditions 2012 et 2013. Deux ans plus tard, les Lions indomptables viennent de décrocher la cinquième Coupe d’Afrique des Nations de leur histoire après avoir traversé des années troubles. Le «Knysna» camerounais A l’été 2014, le Cameroun s’était en effet distingué non pas par ses performances sur le...
(AFP (eng) 02/10/17)
Up to 18 players at the just-completed Africa Cup of Nations could be involved in the new-look CAF Champions League when it kicks off this weekend. Among them is Georges Bokwe, one of two unused goalkeepers in the Cameroon squad that defeated Egypt in the final last Sunday in Gabon. Bokwe was kept out of the starting line-up by the consistent brilliance of Spain-based Fabrice Ondoa, who was included in the team of the tournament. But Bokwe is the first choice for regular Champions League entrants Coton Sport from northern Cameroon cotton town Garoua. Coton qualified for the 2008 final, losing to Al Ahly of Egypt, but have fared poorly recently with first round exits in the past two seasons...

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