Tuesday 20 February 2018
(AFP (eng) 11/30/17)
Two police officers were killed by suspected separatists in a restive English-speaking region of Cameroon, the authorities said Thursday, raising to 10 the total number of security officials who have died in attacks this month. "Two police were killed overnight at a border post in Southwest Region," said government spokesman Issa Tchiroma Bakary, blaming English-speaking separatists. Another police officer and a soldier were wounded in the attack. Bakary said a group of police and soldiers were carrying out "routine checks and searches" during the night when they were ambushed by gunmen. A regional police source said the attack took place in Otu, which is in the same region where four soldiers from the army's motorised infantry battalion were killed early...
(AFP (eng) 11/30/17)
A summit gathering European and African leaders from more than 80 countries drew to a close Thursday with plans for the immediate evacuation of some 3,800 African migrants stranded in Libya. Wrapping up the summit in the Ivorian capital, a top African Union official said there could be as many as 700,000 Africans trapped in Libya, where many have suffered attrocities and even been sold into slavery. The two-day summit of the African Union (AU) and European Union (EU) was showcased as a project to boost development in Africa as it faces a population crunch.
(AFP (eng) 11/30/17)
Twenty-five asylum seekers from Africa arrived safely in Rome Thursday, using a Christian "humanitarian corridor" set up for Syrians fleeing the war in their homeland. "It was just a project but it became THE project, the way of the future," said Mario Morcone of the Italian interior ministry. The 25 men, women and children from Somalia, Eritrea and South Sudan arrived in Rome before dawn on a flight from Ethiopia. They will be moved to centres across the country. "We want to ensure that people do not risk their lives in the desert and at sea," Morcone said. "This is an important turning point in the politics of our country. You are witness to this turning point and we will...
(AFP (eng) 11/29/17)
Four Cameroonian soldiers were killed by suspected separatists in a restive English-speaking region early Wednesday, army and government sources said. "Four soldiers were killed around 2:00 am around Mamfe," a city in the country's Southwest Region, according to an army source. "They murdered our soldiers. If that's not terrorism, what is it?" the source said angrily. The deaths were confirmed by a government source, though the circumstances were not given. The bloodshed is the latest episode in an escalating crisis in the Southwest and Northwest regions, home to a large minority of English-speakers in the francophone-majority nation. Eight members of the security forces have been killed this month alone.
(AFP (eng) 11/29/17)
More than 80 African and European leaders will gather in the Ivory Coast on Wednesday to promote jobs and stability for Africa's exploding population, with some calling for a new "Marshall Plan." The two-day summit in Abidjan opens as the European Union increasingly sees its fate linked to Africa's following the twin shocks of unprecedented migration and terrorist attacks. It comes as China, India, Japan, the Gulf Arab states and others also compete for influence on a continent where the 28-nation EU remains as a whole the biggest economic and political player. European Parliament President Antonio Tajani told parliamentarians from both continents before the summit...
(AFP (eng) 11/28/17)
Hard cash but also the intangible ties of history have kept Europe in pole position as Africa's main partner, even if an influx of Chinese investment is prompting many African countries to look eastward. Successive years of hefty spending, particularly in infrastructure, have propelled China into the continent's top slot when calculated in terms of individual investor nations. But a quite different picture emerges when this is seen through a broader prism -- the ties between Africa and Europe as a 28-nation bloc. "Europe is in front, given the shared history," said Pierre Dagbo Gode, professor of political science at the Felix Houphouet Boigny University of Abidjan. "Europe is the premier trade partner, the top investor, the top donor," a...
(AFP (eng) 11/28/17)
A furore over migrant slave markets in Libya casts a shadow over an AU-EU summit this week that aims to promote Africa's long-term economic growth and stability, spurred by European fears of terrorism and mass migration. The two-day African Union and European Union summit opening Wednesday in the Ivory Coast economic capital Abidjan is focused mainly on the need to create jobs for Africa's rapidly growing population. The summit marks what Europe sees as a potential turning point for broader and deeper ties with a continent it once colonised widely -- while China, Japan, India and Gulf Arab states also compete for influence. However, outrage over the slave trade in Libya looms over the talks in Abidjan, with the scandal...
(AfricaNews 11/21/17)
The African Union has called for an investigation on the Libyan authorities regarding the ‘slave markets’ of African migrants in the conflict torn nation. The Chairperson of the African Union Commission, Professor Alpha Conde, strongly condemned the despicable acts which are at odds with the ideals of the Founding Fathers of the Organization and relevant African and international instruments, including the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights. He calls for an immediate end to these practices and other criminal acts of human trafficking. He calls for a swift action to be taken and identify all perpetrators and accomplices, with the view of bringing the criminals to justice. This comes following the release of shocking images showing the sale of...
(AFP (eng) 11/20/17)
A suicide attack at a market on Monday killed at least two civilians and wounded around 20 others in a northern region of Cameroon plagued by Boko Haram attacks, sources said. The attacker concealed the bomb inside a bag of beans and exploded in the middle of a crowd in Kolofata, according to a source close to the security services. A police source in the region confirmed the attack to AFP. Boko Haram, a militant Islamist group, has been blamed for repeated assaults on Kolofata, including one particularly brazen operation in July 2014 that involved kidnapping the wife of the country's deputy prime minister, Amadou Ali. Since 2014, when Cameroon went to war against Boko Haram, the group has killed...
(AFP (eng) 11/20/17)
At least four people, including a police officer, were injured during overnight clashes in an English-speaking region of Cameroon, in which gunshots were heard ringing out despite a curfew imposed to contain an escalating crisis. sources said Sunday. A source close to the security services said the officer received a gunshot wound near the Food Market in Bamenda, a city of 300,000 people in the mountains of western Cameroon that is the epicentre of anglophone resentment of perceived discrimination by the country's French-speaking majority. The officer's life was not in danger, the source said, without providing further details on the skirmishes between "extremists" and the police. Two other men were injured in the clashes, one of whom said he was...
(AFP (eng) 11/20/17)
srael's cabinet voted on Sunday to close a migrant detention centre, as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced an agreement to deport 40,000 Africans who entered the country illegally. Ministers unanimously approved plans to shutter the Holot centre in southern Israel and gave migrants a three-month deadline to leave the country or face deportation, said the interior and public security ministries. "The infiltrators will have the option to be imprisoned or leave the country," the public security ministry said in a statement. Israeli official figures from June 30 show a total of 38,043 African migrants in the country. They include 27,494 Eritreans and 7,869 Sudanese, and their presence in south Tel Aviv has raised discontent among Israelis there and elsewhere. Speaking...
(AFP (eng) 11/18/17)
he African Union on Friday called for Libyan authorities to investigate "slave markets" of black Africans operating in the conflict-torn nation, following the release of shocking images showing the sale of young men. The demand follows the release of CNN footage of a live auction in Libya where black youths are presented to north African buyers as potential farmhands and sold off for as little as $400. Guinean President Alpha Conde, who is also Chairman of the African Union, demanded an enquiry and prosecutions relating to what he termed a "despicable trade... from another era". Meanwhile Senegal's government. commenting on Facebook, expressed "outrage at the sale of Sub-Saharan African migrants on Libyan soil,"...
(AFP (eng) 11/17/17)
The United Nations on Friday underscored its commitment to Cameroon's "territorial integrity and unity" as the francophone-majority country grappled with violence and separatism in two English-speaking regions. The UN's Regional Office for Central Africa (UNOCA) said it was deeply concerned by the upsurge in violence, "particularly against the civilian population and state agents." UNOCA chief Francois Lounceny Fall, who is also the secretary general's envoy for central Africa, recalled the commitment of the UN to "the territorial integrity and unity of Cameroon." He called for calm and restraint and the holding of an "inclusive dialogue." The statement was issued after violence erupted in the Northwest and Southwest Regions of Cameroon, where most of the country's English-speaking minority live. Anglophones, who...
(AFP (eng) 11/17/17)
A fire swept through the main building of Cameroon's parliament in Yaounde overnight, causing substantial damage but no injuries. The apparently accidental blaze broke out in the administrative part on the rear facade of the building, the government said, but the debating chamber is believed to have been spared. The fire was completely out by dawn on Friday, an AFP photographer saw. "A violent fire devastated the rear facade of the main building of the Ngoa Ekelle Glass Palace last night," Cameroon's public broadcaster CRTV reported, referring to the west African nation's parliamentary building. The fire broke out around 9:00 pm (2000 GMT) Thursday, and the flames were under control six hours later after causing "a lot of material damage"...
(AFP (eng) 11/17/17)
It's only 8pm, but in the bars by the Hospital Roundabout, one of the liveliest nightspots in Bamenda, thoughts are already turning to last orders. "We respect the curfew, we're going to close soon," a waitress warns grumbling clients who would rather drink on into the night as of old, despite a police crackdown triggered by sporadic bombings, arson and killings. Bamenda, a city of about 300,000 people nestled in the mountains of western Cameroon, is the epicentre of an escalating crisis. At its source is resentment among Cameroon's English-speaking minority, angry at perceived discrimination at the hands of the country's francophone majority. Frustration, for some, has spiralled into violence.
(BBC News Africa 11/17/17)
The main parliament building in Cameroon's capital Yaoundé has been badly damaged by fire which ripped through four floors. Firefighters managed to put out the blaze before it could reach the parliamentary chamber. There has so far been no indication of any casualties and the cause of the blaze was not immediately clear. In this week's session, the national assembly had been discussing the budget. Pictures and video posted on social media show the upper floors in flames, hours after it first took hold. Read more at: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-42024655
(AFP (eng) 11/17/17)
Africa is making only faltering progress towards food and nutrition security, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has warned. "Multiple forms of malnutrition coexist, with countries experiencing simultaneously high rates of child undernutrition or anaemia as well as high rates of obesity," it says in a new report, Regional Overview of Food Security and Nutrition. In sub-Saharan Africa, "progress towards the World Health Assembly global nutrition targets has been generally poor," the Rome-based agency says, referring to goals to end hunger by 2025. The annual document came out Thursday at the start of a two-day food and health seminar in Ivory Coast's economic capital, Abidjan. Around 200 people from 47 African nations are gathered to discuss "sustainable food systems...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/14/17)
KIGALI (Reuters) - The global airline industry has $1.2 billion blocked in nine dollar-strapped African countries, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) said on Monday. The global commodities price crash that began in 2014 hit economies across Africa hard, particularly big resource exporters such as Angola and Nigeria. Low oil and mineral prices have reduced government revenue and caused chronic dollar shortages and immense pressure on local currencies. The fiscal slump has meant governments have not allowed foreign airlines to repatriate their dollar profits in full. At an aviation meeting in the Rwandan capital, IATA’s Vice President for Africa, Raphale Kuuchi, said that airlines were in talks with “a few governments to unblock airline funds”. He did not specify the...
(AFP (eng) 11/13/17)
Four makeshift bombs exploded overnight in the main city in Cameroon's restive English-speaking region, but no one was injured, officials said Monday. "Four home-made bombs exploded in Bamenda, one at 9:00 pm and the three others at 3:00 am," said a source close to the security services. "The blasts did not cause any casualties. They caused minor damage in various places," the source said, in an account confirmed by a security source in the capital Yaounde. One of the explosions detonated close to a police unit from the Mobile Intervention Squad (GMI) and another near a well-known supermarket, the sources said.
(Reuters (Eng) 11/13/17)
YAOUNDE (Reuters) - Separatists from Cameroon’s Anglophone region have killed four security forces in several attacks over the past few days, the government said on Saturday, an unprecedented violent turn to a movement that risks morphing into a full blown insurgency. A government crackdown on the separatists has killed dozens of people since October and driven many into the arms of a once-fringe separatist movement ahead of presidential elections in 2018. It followed on from demonstrations a year ago by English-speakers in the western region bordering Nigeria against what they see as a marginalization by the mostly French-speaking government of President Paul Biya, who has been in power for 35 years. Only a minority want to secede, however. The secessionists...

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