Saturday 16 December 2017
(AFP (eng) 09/29/17)
Government shutdowns of the internet have cost sub-Saharan Africa about $237 million since 2015, according to a study released Friday, as authorities increasingly implement planned disruptions. At least 12 countries have had internet shutdowns, often before elections or when protests erupt, with mobile internet networks most recently suspended in Togo during opposition demonstrations. "Internet disruptions, however short-lived, undermine economic growth, disrupt the delivery of critical services, erode business confidence, and raise a country’s risk profile," the CIPESA report said. The Collaboration on International ICT Policy for East and Southern Africa (CIPESA) released its...
(Human Rights Watch 09/28/17)
(Abuja) – Cameroon’s military has carried out a mass forced return of 100,000 Nigerian asylum seekers in an effort to stem the spread of Boko Haram, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. The deportations defy the UN refugee agency’s plea not to return anyone to northeast Nigeria “until the security and human rights situation has improved considerably,” and leaves deportees facing spiralling violence, displacement and destitution. The 55-page report, “‘They Forced Us Onto Trucks Like Animals’: Cameroon’s Mass Forced Return and Abuse of Nigerian Refugees,” documents that since early 2015, Cameroonian soldiers have tortured, assaulted, and sexually exploited Nigerian asylum seekers in remote border areas, denied them access to the UN refugee agency, and summarily deported, often...
(Voice of America 09/28/17)
Business activity has come to a standstill as Cameroon has sealed its northern border with the troubled Central African Republic following escalating violence in the neighboring country. Cameroon says several of its citizens have been kidnapped and taken to C.A.R. by armed groups. Hundreds of villagers in the Cameroon northern town of Mayo Rey celebrated the return home of three traders captured by armed groups from their town two weeks ago. They were taken across the border to the Central African Republic and their families asked to pay $10,000 each the hostages release. Among the crowd was Julie Nelem, 25, whose uncle was kidnapped . She is very happy her uncle has returned, allowing her to continue to have money...
(Daily Post 09/28/17)
Cameroon government has sent 100,000 Nigerian refugees packing. The Human Rights Watch (HRW), which made this known, yesterday, said the deportation defied a plea by the United Nations (UN) refugee agency not to return anyone to the North Eastern, where Boko Haram has killed thousands of people, “until security and human rights situation improved considerably.” The group, which investigates allegations of human rights abuses worldwide, said the report was based on interviews with more than 60 refugees. It noted that soldiers tortured, assaulted and sexually exploited Nigerian asylum seekers and denied them access to the UN refugee agency. “The Cameroonian military torture and abuse of Nigerian refugees seems to be driven by an arbitrary decision to punish them for Boko...
(AFP (eng) 09/27/17)
Cameroon was on Wednesday accused of forcibly returning some 100,000 Nigerian refugees in breach of international agreements, putting them in danger from Boko Haram Islamists. Human Rights Watch said Nigerians who had sought refuge across the border because of the Islamist violence had been abused, attacked and even sexually exploited by soldiers. Conditions in the only official camp for Nigerians were poor, free movement was restricted and refugees were denied proper contact with UN officials, it added. "Since early 2015, the Cameroonian authorities have summarily deported
(The Guardian 09/27/17)
Nigerian refugees claim they have been arbitrarily punished by soldiers for Boko Haram attacks in Cameroon as study alleges 100,000 have been forced out. Refugees who fled the Islamist militant group Boko Haram are being driven out of Cameroon and back to Nigeria, where they face violence and destitution, human rights organisations have said. The Cameroonian military has forced 100,000 refugees to return to north-east Nigeria since 2015, in many cases after torturing, assaulting and sexually abusing them, according to a report by Human Rights Watch (HRW). The study builds on figures released earlier this year by the UN High commissioner for Refugees, the UN refugee agency. The figures were accompanied by the UNHCR’s first public criticism of the authorities...
(Bloomberg 09/27/17)
Studio 189, a label founded by actress Rosario Dawson and fashion executive Abrima Erwiah, is reinvesting in its African roots. It’s hard enough to build a fashion brand, let alone an empire. Rare is the person who makes a mission of using fashion to build communities. Such is the case with Studio 189, a label founded by longtime friends Abrima Erwiah (formerly a marketing executive at Bottega Veneta) and Rosario Dawson (an enduring star most recently seen in Netflix’s Marvel franchise). “The idea is to produce everything in local markets,” says Erwiah. “Particularly in Africa, particularly in Ghana.” The founders set up the company in partnership with the United Nations’ Ethical Fashion Initiative, which also works with such socially conscious...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/26/17)
International wildlife charities are funding anti-poaching squads that arrest, torture and kill indigenous ‘pygmy’ people for hunting in their ancestral forests in the Congo Basin, according to a charity for tribal people. Conservation organizations including the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) have backed ranger teams who have forced forest dwellers out of national parks in Cameroon, Central African Republic, and Congo Republic, said the report by Survival International. Since 1989, the expansion of protected parks has led to the eviction of indigenous Baka and Bayaka people from their homelands, the criminalization of traditional forest hunting, and brutal attacks by wildlife rangers, said Survival. The report, published on Monday, said forest “eco guards”, equipped and coordinated by wildlife charities, are responsible for...
(AFP (eng) 09/26/17)
Wildlife guards funded by the WWF and other conservation groups have carried out systematic abuses against tribes in central Africa, an activist group claimed on Monday. Survival International, a British rights group, published a report containing more than 200 reported incidents against the Baka and Bayaka Pygmies in Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic since 1989. It claimed some of the world's largest conservation organisations, including the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), have illegally evicted the tribes from their ancestral homelands "in the name of conservation".
(Reuters (Eng) 09/26/17)
Israel’s Elbit Systems Ltd said on Tuesday it won a contract worth $240 million to provide a wide array of defense electronic systems to an unnamed country in Africa. The contract, which will be carried out over a two-year period, is comprised of Directed Infra-red Counter Measure (DIRCM) systems to protect aircraft from shoulder fired missiles, based on passive infrared systems, and includes missile warning systems, radio and communication systems, land systems, mini-unmanned air systems and helicopters upgrade.
(APA 09/25/17)
Eximbank of China has approved a CFAF50 billion loan to Cameroon to fund drinking water supply projects throughout the country, reports said on Monday. The agreement was struck by the ministry of Economy, Planning and Regional Development (MINEPAT) and China’s economic and technical cooperation for the funding of the second phase of the project, covering nine urban centers. Running from 2018 through 2021, the second phase covers the towns of Dschang in the western region, Yabassi (Littoral), Maroua (Far North), Garoua (North) and Garoua-Boulai (East). The first phase 2014-2017 has benefited localities of Bafoussam (West), Bamenda (North-West), Kribi and Sangmélima (South). In the water supply sector, Eximbank of China has already financed more than CFAF 200 billion between 2008 and...
(APA 09/25/17)
APA-Yaoundé (Cameroon) - The Cameroonian subsidiary of the French group Bolloré Transport and Logistics has announced that it will invest in social projects throughout the country, following renovation work undertaken by it in public schools of New-Deido located in the economic metropolis, Douala. Indeed, in the aftermath of the 2nd edition of its “Marathon Day,” a sports event held last Thursday in this city and which gathered 700 staff his director for the Gulf of Guinea region, Mohamed Diop, insisted on the symbolic aspect aimed at arousing, in each of the collaborators, “the strong feelings of belonging to a family group sensitive to the ideals of solidarity, fraternity and humility.” Interviewed by APA, he recalled that Bolloré Transport & Logistics’...
(APA 09/25/17)
The French embassy in Cameroon has just marked the Central African country’s English-speaking western region as "red zones" due to the increasing social upheaval, advising its citizens to avoid traveling to the area, reports said on Monday. "Due to the tensions in the English-speaking regions of Cameroon (North West, South West), it is recommended to travelers to this area to avoid gatherings and not to go out at night," the French embassy cautioned. "Moreover, in the context of a general strike, it is advisable to refrain from travelling in the cities - notably Bamenda, Buea, Limbe, Kumba," the embassy added. For the French living in these areas, they are urged to show caution and to strictly abide by the safety...
(Voice of America 09/25/17)
Cameroon's National Communication Council, the government media regulator, has suspended 30 journalists or radio and TV programs for what it calls biased reporting. Among the more than 30 media organizations and journalists the NCC has suspended or warned are newspapers La Nouvelle Expression, La Meteo, L'Anecdote and the capital city radio station Amplitude FM. NCC president Peter Essoka said the media organizations and journalists were suspended from one to six months because of unprofessional conduct and refusal to respect norms and ethics of journalism. "When a journalist comes up with a newspaper article and says a certain minister is known to be running with the prime minister’s wife, how do you take that? It is indecent. It is indecent. And...
(Voice of America 09/25/17)
African first ladies and activists hailed progress that some governments on the continent are making on gender equality. They met on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. “We used to have 23 percent female representation in parliament but, with the stroke of a pen it went up to 48 percent. So, we managed to double our female representation with that decision,” said Namibia’s first lady Monica Geingos at a roundtable invitation-only event co-hosted by the Global First Ladies Alliance (GFLA) and Facebook. Geingos credited the quota enacted by the ruling SWAPO party of her husband, President Hage Geingob. But she said a similar quota might be needed for Namibia’s private sector, where only 10 to...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/23/17)
Thousands of demonstrators from largely Francophone Cameroon’s English-speaking minority took to the streets to demand more rights on Friday, some of them hoisting separatist flags. Two Anglophone regions in the west account for about a sixth of Cameroon’s population. Long-standing complaints of political and economic discrimination spilled over there last year when lawyers and teachers called for reforms. Security forces killed six protesters and arrested hundreds of others, and the internet was shut down in the region from January to April, crippling businesses in a crackdown that was condemned internationally. Friday’s protests were the largest and most widespread in months and came the day after a bomb suspected
(AFP (eng) 09/22/17)
Several thousand demonstrators took to the streets in English-speaking parts of Cameroon in protest at perceived discrimination in favour of the country's francophone majority, concurring sources said. "Several thousand people have been marching in Bamenda," the main town in northwest Cameroon and the hub of anglophone agitation, a source close to the regional authorities said, requesting anonymity. State radio announced that the authorities in the English-speaking northwest had banned all street demonstrations and internal movement within the region's departments (counties) until October 3.
(Reuters (Eng) 09/22/17)
An improvised bomb wounded three policemen in the main city of Cameroon’s minority English-speaking region on Thursday, the regional governor said, in an attack a senior security source blamed on separatist militants. Speaking on state TV, Adolphe Lele Lafrique, Governor of the North West Region, referred to a “terrorist attack” in the city of Bamenda, in the western part of the country. A senior security source told Reuters by telephone the attack was the work of “extremists” who want independence for the Anglophone part of mostly French-speaking Cameroon. If true, it would represent a dangerous escalation of a conflict that had thus far pitted only unarmed demonstrators against the security forces.
(Reuters (Eng) 09/22/17)
From deadly droughts and destroyed crops to shrinking water sources, communities across sub-Saharan Africa are struggling to withstand the onslaught of global record-breaking temperatures. But the dangers do not end there. Rising heat poses another threat - one that is far less known and studied but could spark disease epidemics across the continent, scientists say. Mosquitoes are the menace, and the risk goes beyond malaria. The Aedes aegypti mosquito, which spreads debilitating and potentially deadly viruses, from Zika and dengue to chikungunya, thrives in warmer climates than its malaria-carrying cousin, known as Anopheles, say researchers at Stanford University. In sub-Saharan Africa, this means malaria rates could rise in cooler areas as they heat up, but fall in hotter places that...
(APA 09/21/17)
APA-Douala (Cameroon) - Rehabilitation of the Douala-Yaoundé road linking the main economic and political metropolitan areas of Cameroon requires an investment of 47 billion CFA. This will allow replacing the metal nozzles with concrete scuppers, the Ministry of Public Works (MINTP) said Thursday. According to a study by the Directorate of Infrastructure Works (DGTI) at the Ministry of Public Works, 309 nozzles should be replaced to stop the gradual deterioration of the road. “Traffic on this road has increased considerably. We must not forget that we are the gateway to several countries of the hinterland. We have a lot of heavy goods vehicles on this Yaoundé-Douala road. We are currently carrying out technical studies for the rehabilitation of the heavy...

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