| Africatime
Sunday 23 April 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 12/21/16)
Seven Cameroon players have said they do not want to go to the African Nations Cup finals, setting them on a collision course with the country's football federation and a possible ban from playing for their clubs while the tournament is on. Joel Matip of Liverpool is one of the seven who told coach Hugo Broos they are not interested in being selected for the tournament in Gabon, which starts on January 14. "These players have put personal interest above those of the national team and the federation reserves the right to take action against the players in accordance with FIFA regulations," said Broos in a statement on Tuesday. The other six are Andre Onana (Ajax Amsterdam), Guy Roland Ndy...
(The Citizen 12/21/16)
Tanzania is among some African countries which may see a drop in development aid as the US is likely to expand fiscal stance and cut spending during Donald Trump's presidency, a new report shows. The move by the world's largest economy will affect dependent countries such as Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria and DRC according to the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) latest report released in London yesterday. In its Economic Insight: Africa Q4 2016, the accountancy and finance body points out that signs of an expansionary fiscal stance under the Trump administration coupled with spending cuts to accommodate increased infrastructure expenditure are likely to lead to the decrease in aid. "Aid is one of the main...
(AFP (eng) 12/20/16)
When Rose Kariuki first felt a lump on her left breast, the spectre of cancer -- a disease she had only heard of on television -- was the last thing on her mind. "To me, cancer was nowhere near us. It was shocking, I feared death, I feared so many things," the 46-year-old Kenyan school teacher told AFP. Rose is one of a growing number of Africans suffering from cancer, one of the lifestyle diseases -- along with diabetes and heart problems -- proving increasing deadly on the continent. A World Health Organisation (WHO) survey released Tuesday showed that most Africans had at least one risk factor for developing one of these diseases, such as smoking, a lack of exercise,...
(Voice of America 12/16/16)
Cameroon is deploying more troops to protect the Lobeke National Park on its border with the Central African Republic (CAR) after a deadly attack earlier this month by armed poachers. The attackers fled back across the border into the CAR leaving behind carcasses of protected animals and tusks from at least 20 elephants. Forest ranger Forgui Kabsia said armed poachers opened fire on him and other rangers as they patrolled the Lobeke National Park in southeastern Cameroon. He said the park is being invaded by armed men from the neighboring CAR.
(Voice of America 12/16/16)
The border between Nigeria and Cameroon has been completely reopened for the first time in three years. It’s a key sign of progress in the war against Boko Haram. Officials from the two countries met this week in Yaounde to review security issues. They were welcomed by a military band before sitting down to discuss Boko Haram. Officials here say the threat of terrorist attacks has been greatly reduced due to joint cross-border military raids targeting the Islamist militant group. They say that the border between Cameroon and Nigeria is now completely reopened, a process that began last month. "Only a secured environment can provide avenue for meaningful trade and commercial activities as well as unimpeded exchange of goods and...
(AFP (eng) 12/16/16)
The number of migrants feared to have died this year has soared to nearly 7,200 -- a more than 20-percent increase over 2015 -- with most of the fatalities in the Mediterranean, IOM said Friday. In total, 7,189 migrants and refugees have died or remain missing on migratory routs around the world, the International Organization for Migration said. That number is already 1,449 more than in all of 2015. And since it represents an average of 20 deaths per day, another 200 to 300 people could perish by the end of the year if the trend continues, the Geneva-based IOM warned in a statement. The Mediterranean Sea routes, used so far this year by nearly 360,000 people seeking a new...
(CNN 12/15/16)
In the sleepy, sun-blasted town of De Aar in central South Africa, a mighty force is stirring. The largest solar plant in Africa, Middle East and the Southern hemisphere was inaugurated here earlier this year, a 175-megawatt facility that spreads over almost 500 hectares. The facility is the brainchild of Solar Capital, led by hotel magnate turned solar evangelist Paschal Phelan, which ploughed $400 million into the venture. The plant supplies power to the National Grid, but when the heat is fiercest it produces far more than the Grid can use, and the excess power goes to waste. "It's like you have a Ferrari and you run a small car," says Massimiliano Salaorno, plant manager of Solar Capital De Aar...
(The Guardian 12/14/16)
International organisations are calling for an investigation in Cameroon after four people were killed during unrest in the country’s English-speaking regions. Tensions have been brewing for the past month in Cameroon’s two anglophone regions, where people say they are being treated as second-class citizens. What began as protests by lawyers against the use of French in courts quickly spread to schools and universities after teachers agreed to strike over the dominance of the French language. In Bamenda, the country’s largest anglophone city, at least four people were killed last week when security forces fired live
(AFP (eng) 12/14/16)
Family planning helps people in Africa to be healthier and wealthier, as women without contraceptives become locked in "a cycle of poverty," Melinda Gates told AFP as a conference on the topic was held in Ivory Coast. "When a woman has access to contraceptives she can lift herself out of poverty, and if she doesn't have access to contraceptives, it locks her inside a cycle of poverty for the rest of her life," said the wife of Microsoft co-founder and billionaire Bill Gates, whose foundation is very active in the field. Family planning has "huge health benefits for the woman and for her children, and it has economic benefits," Gates told AFP by telephone from the Ivorian economic capital Abidjan...
(AFP (eng) 12/13/16)
A surge of violence in Cameroon's two English-speaking regions, both longtime opposition bastions, has spotlighted the simmering anger of the anglophone minority as the nation heads for a key presidential election. Angry protesters torched the national flag and hoisted a separatist one in its place in northwest Bamenda last week, where "at least two" people were killed in clashes with the police, authorities said. The opposition alleged four people had been killed and a police station was set ablaze in the second clash in the city between police and protesters in just over two weeks.
(AFP (eng) 12/13/16)
The cocktails keep flowing by the pool on the tourist strip, but in The Gambia's markets many African migrant traders are packing up their businesses and heading home. The international community is piling pressure on President Yahya Jammeh to leave power after 22 years and hand over to opposition leader Adama Barrow, who won an election two weeks ago only for Jammeh to later reverse his original concession of defeat. Of the economy's two main sources of investment from abroad, tourism appears to be weathering the country's political storm far better than the thousands of petty traders who move to The Gambia from the rest of west Africa. President-elect Barrow told AFP on Monday claims that tourist numbers could be...
(AFP (eng) 12/09/16)
Journalists from Cameroon and Ivory Coast on Thursday won Africa's top fact-checking awards for investigating government claims that turned out to be false. Manfei Anderson Diedri, of the website Eburnietoday.com, scooped the francophone award for an eight-month investigation into a land dispute in central Ivory Coast. Diedri uncovered that while Abidjan claimed it had ownership of 11,000 hectares of land granted to a Belgian company for industrial rubber plantations -- which villagers claimed was their property -- there was no proof of this. Arison Tamfu, of the Cameroon Journal, was named winner of the award for English-language media for an investigation into a promise by President Paul Biya to gift laptops to "each student of a public or private university...
(AFP (eng) 12/09/16)
At least two people were killed in clashes between police and protesters from Cameroon's English-speaking minority in the country's northwest on Thursday, state television reported. A group of youths were trying to block a meeting for the ruling People's Democratic Movement (CPDM) of President Paul Biya in the city of Bamenda before police shot at them, opposition Social Democratic Front (SDF) spokesman Denis Nkemlemo said. "At least two people are reported dead and several others injured," CRTV said in its English language evening news. The opposition put the death toll at four. CRTV showed images of a barricade of burning tyres in the centre of Bamenda, the capital of the northwest region.
(Le Monde 12/09/16)
Dozens of politicians, diplomats, military and intelligence chiefs, members of the opposition and leading business figures were wiretapped across the continent. This rare overview of modern satellite espionage could hardly be less technical and abstract, for it not only names the victims of intercepts but also reveals the scale of a surveillance operation spanning an entire continent. That continent is Africa. New documents shown to Le Monde, in collaboration with The Intercept, from the data cache of the former NSA (National Security Agency) operative Edward Snowden, originally given to Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, offer unprecedented insight into information on twenty African countries collected by GCHQ, the British intelligence service, between 2009 and 2010. Dozens of lists of intercepts examined...
(AFP (eng) 12/08/16)
Deadly clashes broke out between police and protesters from Cameroon's English-speaking minority in the country's northwest, an opposition source told AFP on Thursday. A group of youths were trying to block a meeting for the ruling People's Democratic Movement (CPDM) of President Paul Biya in the city of Bamenda before police shot at them, opposition Social Democratic Front (SDF) spokesman Denis Nkemlemo said. "We've been told there are some dead but we're still gathering information," Nkemlemo told AFP. A photo of a bloodied and lifeless body was doing the rounds on social media following the violent clashes, although there was no way of telling where or when it was taken. It is the second time in just over two weeks...
(Reuters (Eng) 12/08/16)
Poverty, conflict and climate change will leave 15 million people across Africa's Sahel belt in need of life-saving aid next year, the United Nations said on Wednesday as it launched a record $2.7 billion humanitarian appeal for the region in 2017. Around 40 percent of the money will be used to help some seven million people in Nigeria affected by the jihadist group Boko Haram's seven-year insurgency, according to the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). OCHA has increased its appeal for eight countries in the semi-arid band stretching from Senegal to Chad more than tenfold in as many years, but each year funding has fallen short. This year's $2 billion appeal has been less than half-funded...
(Voice of America 12/07/16)
The government of Cameroon has dispatched ministers and lawmakers from the English-speaking northwest and southwest regions to their areas of origin, in an effort to calm growing protests over the dominance of French in the country's institutions. Thousands of supporters ask Cameroon's main opposition leader John Fru Ndi to stop the singing of the national anthem in the English regions of Cameroon, calling it a foreign anthem. Fru Ndi told them he was in Buea in support of ongoing strikes organized by lawyers and teachers. "I want the government to listen to the teachers and listen to the lawyers and do what they want them to do, because they are not just talking out of the air. They are speaking...
(Reuters (Eng) 12/07/16)
As the darkness falls on the plains around Bunambiyu, a remote village in Tanzania's northern Shinyanga region, Elizabeth Julius switches on her solar lantern to finish sewing clothes for her customers. Not long ago, nightfall would have forced her to close her tailoring shop, or use a smoky kerosene lamp. But with the solar-powered lamp, Julius can now sew for as long as she wants. "Solar energy has entirely changed my life. I use it at work and at home, yet it doesn't cost me anything," said the 29-year-old entrepreneur and mother of two. "I often wake up at night to work because I need the money to support my family," she said. Julius and her husband, Zablon, used to...
(APA 12/06/16)
The Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) says Africa can yield benefits from commodity-based industrialization and agro-alliance with new policy approaches, according to a statement issued here Tuesday. The ECA has on many editions of its annual Economic Report made a push for the developmental state and a return to planning, arguing that the strong role of the state is key to fostering Africa’s structural transformation. The acting ECA Executive Secretary Abdalla Hamdok spoke on the need for new policy approaches to incentivize agricultural production in activities and sectors with higher returns. In his remarks at the opening of the African Economic Conference on the theme, Feeding Africa: Towards Agro-Allied Industrialization for Inclusive Growth, Hamdok said: “Our desire for structural transformation...
(Voice of America 12/05/16)
The government of Cameroon says its security forces did not abuse protesters during clashes in two regions last month. Students and professionals in English-speaking parts of Cameroon were denouncing what they call the overbearing influence of the French language in the bilingual country. The United States has expressed deep concern about the situation. Government spokesman Issa Tchiroma says contrary to widespread media reports, the military did not abuse the rights of protesting teachers and lawyers in the English-speaking regions of the central African state. "The law enforcement officers [military] handled demonstrations in Bamenda and Buea with respect and professionalism, in strict compliance with international norms and commitments of Cameroon

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