Wednesday 18 October 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 09/26/17)
Cocoa arrivals at Ivory Coast ports had hit around 2 million tons by September 24 since the start of the season on Oct. 1, the largest cocoa harvest ever seen in the world’s top grower, exporters estimated on Monday. The figure was up by about a third from about 1.5 million tons in the same period of the previous season and breaks a world record for a single year’s harvest from any cocoa exporting country. Exporters estimated that around 4,000 tons of beans were delivered to the port of Abidjan and another 6,000 tons to San Pedro for a total of 10,000 tons delivered between September 18 and September 24. That compared with 24,000 tons during the same period of...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/26/17)
Farmers earn so little from coffee that many are likely to abandon their trees, endangering future supplies at a time of surging demand, the head of the International Coffee Organization (ICO) said on Monday. Jose Sette, executive director of the intergovernmental body, said farmers’ low earnings in many countries were depressing supply even as demand grows around 2 percent annually on the back of rising consumption in emerging markets. “If farmers are not well remunerated and encouraged to plant coffee, then at some point in the future we may have difficulties in getting the amount of coffee we need, because demand is growing steadily,” Sette told Reuters in an interview on the sidelines of ICO’s council meeting in Ivory Coast’s...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/26/17)
The International Criminal Court on Tuesday said judges had ordered former Ivory Coast president Laurent Gbagbo to remain in detention during his war crimes trial. Judges said Gbagbo presented a flight risk and has a "network of supporters" that could obstruct or endanger trial proceedings if he were released. Gbagbo's defense team had requested provisional release but judges said they failed to propose "concrete and solid" conditions that would ensure Gbagbo's continued presence at the trial. Gbagbo is accused of four counts of crimes against humanity, including murder, rape, persecution and other inhumane acts allegedly committed during post-electoral violence in Ivory Coast between 16 December 2010 and 12 April 2011 when Gbagbo refused to accept defeat by rival Alassane Ouattara...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/26/17)
Israel’s Elbit Systems Ltd said on Tuesday it won a contract worth $240 million to provide a wide array of defense electronic systems to an unnamed country in Africa. The contract, which will be carried out over a two-year period, is comprised of Directed Infra-red Counter Measure (DIRCM) systems to protect aircraft from shoulder fired missiles, based on passive infrared systems, and includes missile warning systems, radio and communication systems, land systems, mini-unmanned air systems and helicopters upgrade.
(Reuters (Eng) 09/25/17)
Ivory Coast has accepted a ruling by the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea that favored Ghana in a dispute over the location of the maritime boundary separating the two West African neighbors, an Ivorian government spokesman said. “What’s important is to preserve our good neighborly relations with Ghana,” Bruno Kone said on Monday. “And this judgment allows for a definitive demarcation of the maritime boundary.”
(Reuters (Eng) 09/25/17)
Cocoa arrivals at Ivory Coast ports had hit around 2 million tons by September 24 since the start of the season on Oct. 1, the largest cocoa harvest ever seen in the world’s top grower, exporters estimated on Monday. The figure was up by about a third from about 1.5 million tons in the same period of the previous season and breaks a world record for a single year’s harvest from any cocoa exporting country. Exporters estimated that around 4,000 tons of beans were delivered to the port of Abidjan and another 6,000 tons to San Pedro for a total of 10,000 tons delivered between September 18 and September 24. That compared with 24,000 tons during the same period of...
(APA 09/25/17)
The settlement of the sea-boundary dispute between Ghana and Ivory Coast dominates the headlines of Ghanaian newspapers on Monday. The Daily Graphic, The B&FT and others dedicated their front pages to the dispute in which Ghana emerged victorious. The three-year dispute had to be settled by the Special Chamber of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS) through a unanimous decision. The court rejected all the claims put up by Ivory Coast and upheld that Ghana did not breach any international laws as well as disobeyed the court's order not to further drill oil wells in the disputed sea area. The tribunal generated a new boundary which will work in the interest of both Ghana and Ivory...
(Voice of America 09/25/17)
African first ladies and activists hailed progress that some governments on the continent are making on gender equality. They met on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. “We used to have 23 percent female representation in parliament but, with the stroke of a pen it went up to 48 percent. So, we managed to double our female representation with that decision,” said Namibia’s first lady Monica Geingos at a roundtable invitation-only event co-hosted by the Global First Ladies Alliance (GFLA) and Facebook. Geingos credited the quota enacted by the ruling SWAPO party of her husband, President Hage Geingob. But she said a similar quota might be needed for Namibia’s private sector, where only 10 to...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/22/17)
From deadly droughts and destroyed crops to shrinking water sources, communities across sub-Saharan Africa are struggling to withstand the onslaught of global record-breaking temperatures. But the dangers do not end there. Rising heat poses another threat - one that is far less known and studied but could spark disease epidemics across the continent, scientists say. Mosquitoes are the menace, and the risk goes beyond malaria. The Aedes aegypti mosquito, which spreads debilitating and potentially deadly viruses, from Zika and dengue to chikungunya, thrives in warmer climates than its malaria-carrying cousin, known as Anopheles, say researchers at Stanford University. In sub-Saharan Africa, this means malaria rates could rise in cooler areas as they heat up, but fall in hotter places that...
(Citifmonline 09/21/17)
President Akufo Addo says his government will not make any pronouncements on the yet to be delivered judgment on the maritime border dispute between Ghana and Ivory Coast. Nana Addo maintains that a lot of work is ongoing on how best to handle the outcome of the three year dispute. The International Tribunal of the Law of the Sea (ITLOS), is expected to give its ruling on the matter on Saturday, September 23, 2017. The landmark ruling is also expected to at least bring finality to the litigation between Ghana and Ivory Coast. Speaking to the Bloomberg in the USA, President Akufo Addo stressed that the judgment will inform his government’s decision going forward. “The ruling is on Saturday and...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/21/17)
Makers of generic AIDS drugs will start churning out millions of pills for Africa containing a state-of-the-art medicine widely used in rich countries, after securing a multi-million dollar guarantee that caps prices at just $75 per patient a year. Global health experts hope the deal will help address two looming problems in the HIV epidemic - the rising threat of resistance developing to standard AIDS drugs, and the need for more investment in manufacturing capacity. Bill Gates’ charitable foundation will guarantee minimum sales volumes of the new combination pills using dolutegravir, a so-called integrase inhibitor that avoids the drug resistance that often develops with older treatments. In return the drugmakers, India-based Mylan Laboratories and Aurobindo Pharma, will agree the maximum...
(Graphic Online 09/20/17)
Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire have jointly appealed to the African Development Bank (AfDB) for a loan facility of $1.2 billion to set up warehouses and establish chocolate manufacturing facilities. The decision of the two countries is in response to the sharp decline of the price of cocoa on the international market. The Minister of Food and Agriculture, Dr Owusu Afriyie Akoto, disclosed this to the Daily Graphic after his return from Ivory Coast where he paid a courtesy call on President Alassane Ouattara. Dr Akoto was in Cote d’Ivoire for the African Green Revolution Forum on the theme: “Accelerating Africa’s path to prosperity; Growing inclusive economies and jobs through agriculture,” to showcase Ghana’s agricultural flagship programme, Planting for Food and...
(Bloomberg 09/20/17)
Ghana’s cocoa board pays $27 more for a bag of beans than it’s worth in Ivory Coast. Illicit traders are profiting from the difference. Much of Jamilatu Mohammed’s harvest of cocoa beans is sitting in a storage shed near her dilapidated mud house along Ghana’s western border when it should be on its way to factories of chocolatiers like Nestle SA. The mother of two and other small growers in the world’s no. 2 producer represent the casualties in a global price slump triggered by traders in London and Singapore and aggravated by bureaucrats in distant African capitals. Cheaper beans from neighboring Ivory Coast, the biggest supplier, are flooding the local market and luring the Ghanaian state-licensed agents who were...
(APA 09/20/17)
The Ivorian State-Private Sector Consultation Committee (CCESP), on Tuesday launched in Abidjan the activities of the scientific committee of the fourth edition of sectoral meetings dedicated to agriculture. The event was in the presence of development partners and representatives from professional farming organizations. Coulibaly Siaka Minaya, the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development Chief of staff said the fourth edition of CCESP sectoral meetings should ensure that agriculture is organized to “take into account the sustainability of the farming sector.” Minaya said “If emergence was a train, the agricultural sector must be the locomotive that would pull along the other wagons” in order to make the economy of the country more competitive and efficient. To this end, Coulibaly invited participants...
(Bloomberg 09/19/17)
Kadi Bah saw people starving in the Sahara desert and drowning in the Mediterranean during her failed six-month odyssey to reach Europe. But as soon as the United Nations plane bringing her back home from Libya to Ivory Coast touched down, she was hatching plans to try again. “I’ll be so proud of myself if I can make it to Europe; I’ll tell everybody I managed to leave,” the 23-year-old hairdresser said. “That’s why I keep trying.” At first glance, Bah’s determination to emigrate is puzzling. She has a four-year-old daughter. She had a job. Ivory Coast is a regional economic powerhouse, with an average annual growth of 9 percent. Ivorians don’t fit the profile of migrants fleeing war and...
(The Guardian 09/18/17)
Anna Jones says that, through selling its cocoa cheaply, Africa is exporting its wealth overseas; while Sue Banford claims that the soya moratorium in the Amazon has done nothing to halt deforestation. Only the final paragraph in your article on cocoa farming causing deforestation in Ivory Coast (Forests pay price for world’s taste for cocoa, 14 September) mentioned the most fundamental thing – the farmer’s livelihood, or lack of it. The low value of his (or more likely her) crop is undoubtedly the cause of this problem. But cocoa farming could also provide the solution. Recently, I was in Ivory Coast for the African Green Revolution Forum (AGRF) in Abidjan. It united many different parties – governments, the UN’s Food...
(Bloomberg 09/15/17)
Societe Generale SA, challenged on its home turf by Orange SA’s push into banking, is fighting back with a new mobile lender in Africa. The French lender started YUP, a new app for smartphones, in Senegal and Ivory Coast and plans to begin operating in four other sub-Saharan countries this year and next, the company said on Thursday. The bank aims to double its client base to 2 million in the region within three years. “Telcos have opened the way and they’ve gotten ahead,” Alexandre Maymat, who oversees Societe Generale’s operations in French-speaking Africa, said at a press briefing. “We’re catching up” by redefining the retail strategy and providing a broader offering than telephone companies. Chief Executive Officer Frederic Oudea...
(AFP (eng) 09/14/17)
The chocolate industry is indirectly driving massive and illegal deforestation in Ivory Coast, fuelling a catastrophic decline in wildlife, a green group said Wednesday. "In several national parks and other protected areas, 90 percent or more of the land mass has been converted to cocoa," the group Mighty Earth said in its investigation. "Less than four percent of Ivory Coast remains densely forested," it said. "The chocolate companies’ laissez-faire approach to sourcing has driven extensive deforestation in Ghana as well." Habitat loss has been disastrous for protected species, ranging from chimpanzees and leopards to pygmy hippos and elephants, it said. The animals are forced into ever-smaller areas...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/14/17)
LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Your afternoon chocolate bar may be fuelling climate change, destroying protected forests and threatening elephants, chimpanzees and hippos in West Africa, research suggests. Well-known brands, such as Mars and Nestle, are buying through global traders cocoa that is grown illegally in dwindling national parks and reserves in Ivory Coast and Ghana, environmental group Mighty Earth said. “Every consumer of chocolate is a part of either the problem or the solution,” Etelle Higonnet, campaign director at Mighty Earth, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “You can choose to buy ethical chocolate. Or you’re voting with your dollar for deforestation.” Nestle did not immediately respond to requests for comment while Mars said in an email: “We take a...
(Xinhuanet 09/13/17)
In an effort to promote economic development and solve complex conservation challenges facing world heritage sites, the African World Heritage Fund Patron and former President of Namibia Hifikepunye Pohamba will host a business leader's breakfast event in Namibian Capital, Windhoek on Thursday. The African World Heritage Fund is an initiative of the African Member States of the African Union and UNESCO, launched in 2006. Webber Ndoro, executive director of the African World Heritage Fund, at a media briefing on Tuesday in Windhoek said that the aim of the event is to promote a holistic private sector engagement, raise a sense of ownership and accountability for heritage protection as well as transmission of World Heritage sites in Namibia and Africa. "To...

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