| Africatime
Friday 24 March 2017
(Voice of America 12/02/16)
Activists are using the women's Africa Cup of Nations tournament in Cameroon to campaign for the protection of the continent's forests and animal species. The campaign, called “Sports for Nature," is spearheaded by conservationist groups who say some of Africa's natural resources are on the verge of going extinct. In Yaounde, birds sing at a makeshift park near the Ahmadou Ahidjo stadium, one of the sites of the 2016 women's football African Cup of Nations. Conservationist Nevielle Tanyi points toward a crocodile walking nearby and describes the danger it poses to workers trying to maintain a pond. "When we provoke the crocodile to leave the pond area, it goes toward the side where there is no water and it normally...
(AFP (eng) 11/30/16)
Ivory Coast's former first lady Simone Gbagbo and the judge trying her for crimes against humanity clashed Tuesday, with military police forced to prevent her from leaving the courtroom. "Where are you going? Stop her" the court president Boiqui Kouadjo told gendarmes as Gbagbo left the witness box to follow her lawyer who exited the Abidjan courtroom in protest against the proceedings. Gbagbo refused to sit down. "Condemn me if you want, but I'm tired of this. It's nonsense," she said before being admonished by the judge for talking to him "in that tone". Simone Gbagbo is the wife of former Ivory Coast president Laurent Gbagbo, who was forced from power in 2011 by current incumbent Alassane Ouattara, who had...
(Xinhuanet 11/30/16)
Over 250 women security officers from 37 countries across Africa attending Africa Regional Convention of Women in Security Organs here vowed to step up efforts to stamp out gender-based violence (GBV) in the continent. The convention, organized according to the Kigali International Conference Declaration (KICD), was designed to redraw strategies for women officers to play their role in the fight against crimes, especially child abuse and violence against women and girls. At the two-day event that opened Monday, the women officers from police, military and prison services called for more workshops and regular conferences and establishing anti-GBV centers in all member countries of KICD. They also called for prioritizing countries that need more attention in fighting violence against women and...
(Xinhuanet 11/29/16)
Experts in capital markets are advocating the acceleration of the bourses markets across Africa in order to drive economic growth on the continent. Speaking at the opening of Africa securities exchanges conference in the Rwandan capital Kigali on Monday, experts emphasized that capital markets are becoming more important to African economies because they help raise funds for long term investment which will drive Africa into middle income status. Rwanda hosts the 20th African Securities Exchanges Association (ASEA) annual conference from November 27 to 29 dubbed: "The Road to 2030: Making the African Capital Markets Relevant to the Real Economy." The three-day meeting has brought together more than 300 global and regional experts and stakeholders in capital markets, regulators, law firms...
(Washington Post 11/28/16)
Following his release after 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela made sure one of his first trips abroad was to Havana. There, in the Cuban capital in 1991, Mandela lavished his host, Fidel Castro, with appreciation. Castro, said Mandela, was a “source of inspiration to all freedom-loving people.” The scene might seem paradoxical in some corners of the West. How could the global symbol of African liberation and democracy say such a thing about a man whose death last Friday provoked exiles who fled repressive Cuban rule to dance in Miami's streets? How could Mandela — imprisoned by South Africa's apartheid rulers — find common ground with Castro, who cleared his way to absolute power in Cuba by jailing untold...
(AFP (eng) 11/26/16)
Back in the 1970s at the height of the Cold War, the small Caribbean nation of Cuba went to war thousands of miles away in the battlefields of Angola and Ethiopia, leaving thousands dead. Cuban leader Fidel Castro, who died late Friday, was convinced that the global stage for the "world revolution" was happening in Africa -- and thus Cuba became the first Latin American nation to go to war outside its own continent. Angola and Ethiopia soon became symbols of the "regional conflicts" of the Cold War, in which Washington and Moscow battled for ideological supremacy and power through proxy wars. But Havana's involvement in the fighting fields far from home was to cost it dear. Some 4,300 Cubans...
(Agence Ecofin 11/25/16)
Ivorian Minister for urbanism and construction Management Sancho has inaugurated last Monday in Assume, in the South-East of the country, a single office to contain the “land-related pressure” under which the coastal town presently is, APA reported. Headed by Marcelino Jonah, the decentralized structure should help according to the Minister “bring administration closer to the people of the region for a better handling of deed requests”. The desk should also contribute to the securing of urban land plots, by alleviating and orienting procedures related to deed processing. Minister Sancho added that the government, by opening this new office, which is the 73rd across the territory, opts for efficiency and pragmatism. From one desk, we went to 73 across the territory...
(Agence Ecofin 11/25/16)
To conserve biodiversity and enhance socio-economic growth, governments of sub-Saharan Africa must consider a priority the management of their land resources, said environmental experts at the end of the 10th meeting of ministers of natural resources of East and Southern countries in Kigali on November 21 and 22. “The two-day ministerial conference provided a platform for engagement among government officials in the Eastern and Southern African region involved in land administration and spatial planning on challenges and opportunities in land, urban and territorial planning,” Xinhua reported. The forum which focused on identifying means to integrate technologies in land management in order to boost economy, protect the environment and efficiently manage lands in the region, was a wake-up call for officials...
(AFP (eng) 11/24/16)
Plucked out of poverty, 1,000 children in Ivory Coast are being given a unique chance to learn golf, and 10-year-old Jessica likes the idea. "I love golf and my dream is to become an international golfer and work for the World Bank," says the girl, who comes from the poor and often dangerous Dioulabougou district of Yamoussoukro, the country's administrative capital. Wearing a t-shirt and black leggings, Jessica is one of 120 children in the first wave of new golfers to Le President Golf Club, which is normally reserved for Ivory Coast's elite and wealthy.
(Reuters (Eng) 11/24/16)
A mother and her four-year-old daughter who were separated after fleeing the threat of female genital mutilation (FGM) in Ivory Coast may be reunited in Italy before Christmas after a stroke of luck allowed police to trace the woman, authorities said. The girl, identified only as Oumoh, is one of at least 20,000 unaccompanied minors who have reached Italy this year from war-torn and poverty-stricken countries mainly in Africa and the Middle East. She arrived on the southern Italian island of Lampedusa on Nov. 5 after being rescued from a rickety boat by the coastguard, police said. "She was quite traumatized, and initially wouldn't speak or communicate," Marilena Cefala, the head of Lampedusa's reception center, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation...
(The Guardian 11/23/16)
Rulers of the DRC, Burundi, Zimbabwe and others say tide has turned after Obama’s efforts to promote democracy abroad. As the sun rose over Kinshasa on 9 November, Martin Fayulu was awoken by a phone call from a relative in the US telling him to switch on his television – Donald Trump appeared set to become the next US president. Fayulu, an opposition politician at the forefront of recent protests calling for elections to be held on time in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, immediately switched on a French channel. “Many Congolese were watching, and a lot had mixed feelings,” he said. Across Africa the interest was equally intense, with the surprise result prompting fierce speculation about the unexpected...
(AFP (eng) 11/22/16)
Paris Saint-Germain defender Serge Aurier will not be allowed into Britain to face Arsenal in their Champions League clash on Wednesday after British authorities revoked his visa, the French club said. "Paris Saint-Germain is stunned by this incomprehensible situation that attacks the very integrity of the UEFA Champions League," the club said on Tuesday, adding it was because of the Ivory Coast international's September conviction for assaulting a police officer outside a Paris nightclub.
(Reuters (Eng) 11/22/16)
African states failed on Monday to halt the work of the first U.N. independent investigator appointed to help protect gay and transgender people worldwide from violence and discrimination. The 47-member U.N. Human Rights Council, based in Geneva, created the position in June and in September appointed Vitit Muntarbhorn of Thailand, who has a three-year mandate to investigate abuses against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people. In an unusual move, African states put forward a draft resolution in the 193-member U.N. General Assembly third committee, which deals with human rights, calling for consultations on the legality of the creation of the mandate. They said the work of the investigator should be suspended. However, Latin American countries, supported by Western...
(APA 11/21/16)
The Ivorian Minister of Solidarity, Social Cohesion and Compensation of Victims, Pr. Mariatou Kone, on Saturday invited candidates in the December 18 parliamentary elections to advocate “tolerance,” with a view to preserving peace by accompanying the country in its march towards “economic and social progress.” She spoke at the double induction ceremony of the head of the village of Zomplou (Blolequin, extreme west) and the handing over of checks, as part of the compensation for the victims of the crises in Cote d’Ivoire, in the presence of her colleague of Urban Health and Sanitation, Anne Oulotto. Speaking to candidates in the upcoming legislative elections, Pr. Mariatou Kone urged them to draw lessons from the past to make this election a...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/16)
Didier Drogba and the Montreal Impact face a showdown with rival Toronto in Tuesday's first leg of the Major League Soccer semi-finals, which also features a Seattle-Colorado opening matchup. The conference finals will determine what two teams advance to the December 10 MLS Cup final, with either Toronto FC or the Montreal Impact set to become the first Canadian club in the championship match. "It's the kind of game that can be a fantastic experience for football in Canada," Impact striker Drogba said. "This is the best thing that could happen for this country. The way people are so passionate here about the game, it's amazing what we've been doing, what the fans have been doing, so I think it's...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/16)
Yaya Toure made a dramatic return to the English Premier League at the weekend by scoring both goals for Manchester City in a 2-1 win at Crystal Palace. It was the first league start of the season for the giant Ivorian midfielder after being sidelined over a row between his agent and manager Pep Guardiola. Another African to bag a Premier League brace -- his first since 2006 -- was Nigerian Victor Anichebe for Sunderland in a 3-0 victory against Hull City. ENGLAND YAYA TOURE (Manchester City) Surprisingly picked to start for City at Crystal Palace after three months in cold storage, Toure made a storming return to first-team action by scoring twice to earn Pep Guardiola's side a 2-1...
(AFP (eng) 11/21/16)
The number of HIV-infected people taking anti-retroviral medicine has doubled in just five years, the UN said Monday, while highlighting high infection rates among young African women. A new report by UNAIDS said it was on course to hit a target of 30 million people on ARV treatment by 2020. "By June 2016, around 18.2 million people had access to the life-saving medicines, including 910,000 children, double the number five years earlier," UNAIDS said in a statement. But the report showed the huge risks that some young women face. Last year more than 7,500 teenagers and young women became infected with HIV every week worldwide, with the bulk of them in southern Africa. "Young women are facing a triple threat,"...
(AFP (eng) 11/20/16)
Above the sacks of seeds and coal, three kerosene lamps gather dust in the tiny shed that Kenyan chicken farmer Bernard calls home. He prefers to use solar energy to light up his evenings, listen to the radio or watch television, after abandoning a diesel generator he said was expensive to maintain and burned fuel too quickly. "Solar panels are a good, cheap solution," he told AFP. Across the continent, consumers are opting for their own off-grid solar solutions to power homes and small businesses, even as African governments unveil massive new solar projects seemingly every month to expand their grids. According to International Energy Agency projections, almost one billion people in sub-Saharan Africa will gain access to the grid...
(The Guardian 11/19/16)
At COP22, the African Development Bank’s president, Akinwumi Adesina, tells of strategies to improve energy supplies and fight the impact of climate change “We lose 5% of our potential GDP every year, and African industries cannot be competitive without access to electricity,” says Akinwumi Adesina, president of the African Development Bank. “I believe that’s why we can’t break away from reliance on exporting our raw materials – new industries will only go to where there’s power.” He is speaking on the sidelines of the COP22 climate change conference in Marrakech, which ends on Friday. Adesina and colleagues from the bank have been using the conference to highlight its new initiatives on energy, including the New Deal on Energy for Africa,...
(Voice of America 11/18/16)
An Ivory Coast court has ruled that former first lady Simone Gbagbo will be tried in absentia for crimes against humanity after she and her defense team refused to appear. Her husband, Laurent Gbagbo, is being tried at the Hague, but Ivory Coast refused to transfer his wife. Now amid uncertainty over the future of the ICC in Africa, her trial may point to some of the challenges national courts face in dealing with these cases. As the judge announced his decision Wednesday not to force former first lady Simone Gbagbo to appear in court to face charges of crimes against humanity, a man in the audience shook his head in disbelief and sighed. A few meters from him, the...

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