Tuesday 23 January 2018
(AFP (eng) 07/18/13)
Gunmen shot dead a policeman on Wednesday in El-Arish, in Egypt's restive Sinai peninsula, medical sources said. The militants opened fire on the police conscript who was standing outside a police station in north Sinai's main town, hitting him in the neck before fleeing in their vehicle. The victim died instantly, the sources said. This latest deadly attack in the increasingly lawless region, home to Egypt's luxury Red Sea resorts, came as Egyptian troops massed for an offensive against Islamist militants there. Earlier, gunmen attacked two security checkpoints near El-Arish, including one at the airport, according to the MENA state news agency. There were no casualties reported. And in the border town of Rafah, militants fired rocket-propelled grenades at a...
(BBC News Africa 07/18/13)
US Secretary of State John Kerry has again refrained from characterising the ouster of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi by the military as a coup. Washington's hesitation to use the term has drawn accusations from the pro-Morsi camp that the US was complicit in the coup. For the White House, it is an on-going and agonising determination that has legal and possibly even security implications. "This is obviously an extremely complex and difficult situation," said Mr Kerry, speaking in Amman during a news conference with his Jordanian counterpart Nasser Judeh. "The fact is we need to take the time necessary because of the complexity of the situation to evaluate what has taken place," he said. Mr Kerry, and other American officials,...
(Voice of America 07/18/13)
AMMAN, JORDAN — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says Egypt's new interim leaders need to restore stability following the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi. He told Arab League foreign ministers in Jordan that the Obama administration is not rushing to declare this a coup, an important legal distinction that would affect U.S. aid to Egypt. Kerry says Egypt is facing an "extremely complex and difficult situation." "Very clearly, order needs to be restored to the streets, stability needs to be restored, violence needs to be ended, rights need to be protected, jobs need to be created, and the country needs to be able to return to normal business, hopefully," he said. He says the United States wants to see...
(AL Jazeera 07/18/13)
Crowds again fill Cairo after EU foreign policy chief calls for deposed president to be freed from custody. Protests in Egypt continued unabated as international pressure grew on the interim government to free the toppled president, Mohamed Morsi, and return Egypt to democracy. Tens of thousands of people again took to the streets in the early hours of Thursday, with opponents and supporters of Morsi holding rival demonstrations in separate parts of Cairo. They came after EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton visited the city and called on the interim government to immediately free Morsi. He has been kept in since just hours after the military toppled him on July 3. "I believe he should be released. I was assured...
(Bloomberg 07/18/13)
Supporters of Egypt’s deposed Islamist President Mohamed Mursi held demonstrations in Cairo and other cities early today after rejecting the new interim government and its offer of reconciliation talks. Mursi’s backers called for the protests after deadly violence this week laid bare the deepening divisions marring the transition from his rule. The Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice party, from which Mursi hails, considers the new cabinet “illegitimate” and built “on the blood of martyrs,” Hamza Zawba, a spokesman, said by telephone. The mainly secularist cabinet sworn in July 16 and led by Prime Minister Hazem El-Beblawi, an economist and former finance minister, faces the task of restoring order and reviving an economy caught in its worst slump since the overthrow...
(Washington Post 07/18/13)
CAIRO — The head of Egypt’s military, Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, sat with a polite smile in the front row listening to President Mohammed Morsi give a 2 1/2-hour speech defending his year in office. El-Sissi even clapped lightly as the audience of Morsi supporters broke into cheers. It was a calculating display of cool by an army general plotting the overthrow of his commander in chief. Just over a week later, el-Sissi slid in the knife, announcing Morsi’s ouster on state TV on July 3 as troops took the Islamist leader into custody. The move was the culmination of nearly a year of acrimonious relations between el-Sissi and Egypt’s first freely elected — and first civilian — president. A series...
(Washington Post 07/18/13)
THE OBAMA administration dispatched Deputy Secretary of State William J. Burns to Cairo this week in an attempt to clarify to Egyptians where the United States stands on this month’s coup against the elected government of Mohamed Morsi. At a news conference, Mr. Burns delivered a clear message: The United States will “support an open, inclusive, tolerant democratic process” to restore civilian government; Egyptian authorities should refrain from “politically motivated arrests”; and a dialogue must begin with “all sides and all political parties” — meaning the ousted Muslim Brotherhood. The problem, as it has been so often during the past two years, is that Egypt’s generals are ignoring the message from Washington. Mr. Morsi, at least nine other top Muslim...
(Usa Today 07/18/13)
CAIRO — Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood called for fresh protests in Cairo Wednesday as the country's interim cabinet was set to get to work after being sworn in, and as opposing political groups remain at odds over a turbulent political transition. The new cabinet, comprised of leftists, liberals and technocrats, does not include any members of the Brotherhood or the ultraconservative Nour Party — the nation's two principle Islamist groups that, over the past two years, dominated politics. Egypt's interim leaders were expected to offer cabinet positions to the Brotherhood's political wing, although it is unclear if that occurred. Regardless, the Brotherhood had said it would reject any positions. The group is demanding now-deposed president Mohammed Morsi be reinstated, and the...
(NPR 07/18/13)
The past two weeks in Egypt have been a real test for the TV network Al-Jazeera. Accusations that the network is biased toward the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi have resulted in arrests, threats and resignations. On the last day of June and the first days of July, as millions of Egyptians took to the streets to call for Morsi's downfall, Al-Jazeera was there. The network's . The pro-Morsi areas of Cairo were almost always shown as full. The anti-Morsi areas were shown as empty. It was later revealed that the anti-Morsi areas were usually packed — Al-Jazeera just showed them at the times of day that they were empty. Then came the killing of more than...
(The Wall Street Journal 07/18/13)
CAIRO—Egypt's new secular-leaning leaders pushed ahead with plans to amend the country's constitution, as Islamist supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi held small demonstrations to call for his reinstatement. The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party, which backs the deposed leader, said on Wednesday that it would continue to peacefully escalate its protests and rejected offers from the interim leaders for reconciliation talks with what they called an illegitimate government. Thousands of Islamist protesters marched from various parts of Cairo to the country's cabinet on Wednesday. Egypt's new civilian government, which is led by interim President Adly Mansour and Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi, is trying to gain international recognition. It took a step in that direction on Wednesday when the...
(Business Week 07/18/13)
To Mahmoud Sayed, Mohamed Mursi’s election as Egypt’s president a year ago was an opportunity he’d wanted for years: a chance to grow a beard as a sign of his faith. Islamists, he figured, wouldn’t be persecuted as they had under former president Hosni Mubarak. That changed the day after the military deposed Mursi on July 3 following mass street demonstrations. Sayed, a 35-year-old driver, was accosted by two men. He was robbed, beaten and, in a final insult, spat upon and told to pass it on to Mursi. Sayed’s next stop: the barber’s chair. The beard is gone -- and so are his hopes for a country that reconciles Islamic and secular Egyptians. “How did it get to this?”...
(Ahram Online 07/18/13)
Michael Bock clarifies Germany’s stance on the ongoing detention of deposed president Mohamed Morsi, calling for an inclusive democratic process and political reconciliation. German Ambassador to Egypt Michael Bock has clarified his country's position during a small press meeting attended by Ahram Online Wednesday at the German Embassy in Cairo following a contentious statement made by the German foreign ministry calling for the release of deposed president Mohamed Morsi. The statement was widely condemned among Egyptians amidst ongoing political upheaval between supporters and opponents of Morsi’s removal. "We call for an end to the restrictions on Mr Morsi's whereabouts and suggest a trusted institution be granted access to Morsi," stated a German foreign ministry spokesman Friday, identifying the International Committee...
(Ahram Online 07/18/13)
Social justice, subsidised bread, fuel, and security among the many boxes to be ticked by the new cabinet's economic team. Egypt's new interim cabinet, headed by Prime Minister Hazem El-Beblawi, was sworn in on Tuesday amid economic challenges which require a government able to bolster the country's financial image. Several of the newly-appointed ministers have already stated their respective priorities in their initial statements. Finance minister Ahmed Galal said that financial discipline and achieving a balanced economy to create more job opportunities top his to-do list. The liberal economist pointed out that his ministry will also seek to accomplish social justice in such a way that the benefits of domestic growth are distributed fairly among all segments of Egyptian society...
(Boston.com 07/18/13)
The head of Egypt’s military, Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, sat with a polite smile in the front row listening to President Mohammed Morsi give a 2 1/2-hour speech defending his year in office. El-Sissi even clapped lightly as the audience of Morsi supporters broke into cheers. It was a calculating display of cool by an army general plotting the overthrow of his commander in chief. Just over a week later, el-Sissi slid in the knife, announcing Morsi’s ouster on state TV on July 3 as troops took the Islamist leader into custody. The move was the culmination of nearly a year of acrimonious relations between el-Sissi and Egypt’s first freely elected — and first civilian — president. A series of interviews...
(Los Angeles Times 07/18/13)
The military represents stability amid turmoil. Even as many are willing to overlook its transgressions, the military appears eager not to repeat mistakes. The young recruits with rifles and ragged duffels will never see the swimming pools of the officers clubs that line the boulevards of Cairo. They will not profit from the Egyptian military's network of private business interests. They'll eat beans and bread and earn about $30 a month. But they will be respected as men who protect the homeland — from foreign enemies and sometimes from itself. A military coup in most nations would signal alarm about the country's future. In Egypt, much of the country cheered. The military stands for the stability many long for amid...
(Huffingtonpost 07/18/13)
Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi obviously failed, but it is far from certain that his successors will succeed. For they, like Morsi, face a difficult -- some might say impossible -- choice with respect to the Egyptian economy: do what is right and sacrifice popular support... or do what is popular and sacrifice the economy. If Morsi had done the 'right' thing he would have reformed the massive network of food and fuel subsidies that support large segments of the Egyptian populace. That is what the International Monetary Fund wanted him to do as a condition of receiving a $4.8 billion emergency loan. The 'popular' course was to keep the subsidies firmly in place. In reality, 'Morsi's choice' may have been...
(Washington Post 07/18/13)
CAIRO — Several hundred supporters of Egypt’s deposed president massed outside the cabinet building in Cairo on Wednesday, expanding their protests against the country’s new government and demanding the reinstatement of Islamist leader Mohamed Morsi. The rally came as the European Union’s top foreign policy official met with Egypt’s interim leaders, the second senior Western official to visit the country this week. The demonstrators, carrying posters of Morsi and chanting slogans against the military, called the new leadership illegitimate. Morsi, an Islamist and the country’s first democratically elected president, was ousted by the military two weeks ago. Security forces barred the protesters from reaching the cabinet building, but the demonstrators painted graffiti on the walls calling Gen. Abdel Fatah al-Sissi,...
(The Wall Street Journal 07/18/13)
Former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi and other political prisoners should be released and the country must move quickly to elections, European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton urged Wednesday on a visit to Cairo. Baroness Ashton, on her third trip to Cairo since April, met with Egypt's new interim president and prime minister as well as the recently sworn-in vice president and foreign and defense ministers. She also met with officials from the Freedom and Justice Party, the political arm of the Muslim Brotherhood, Mr. Morsi's former prime minister and leaders from Tamarod, a youth petition movement that played a key role in protests against Mr. Morsi's government. At a press conference Wednesday evening, Baroness Ashton said she had stressed...
(AFP (eng) 07/17/13)
Gunmen attacked an Egyptian army checkpoint in the Sinai border town of Rafah wounding eight people, security sources said Wednesday, as troops massed for an offensive against Islamist militants in the restive region. The attackers fired rocket-propelled grenades at the checkpoint in a residential area of Rafah late on Tuesday, before fleeing in their all-terrain vehicle, the sources said. Six soldiers were wounded in the attack as were two civilians, including a 31-year-old man who was hit in the head by a bullet as he fled the scene. Since the ouster by the army of president Mohamed Morsi on July 3, militant groups have launched almost daily attacks on troops and police in the increasingly lawless peninsula, killing several members...
(AFP (eng) 07/17/13)
CAIRO (AFP) – The European Union's top diplomat was heading for Cairo Wednesday, a day after an interim government was sworn in to replace Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, toppled by the military two weeks ago. Announcing the surprise visit, the office of EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said her visit was to press the case for a swift return to democratic rule. "I am going to Egypt to reinforce our message that there must be a fully inclusive political process, taking in all groups which support democracy," Ashton said. Both the Muslim Brotherhood, the influential movement from which Morsi hails, and the ultra-conservative Al-Nur party refused to take part in the new administration. Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad immediately rejected...

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