Sunday 18 February 2018
(Ahram Online 07/18/13)
Michael Bock clarifies Germany’s stance on the ongoing detention of deposed president Mohamed Morsi, calling for an inclusive democratic process and political reconciliation. German Ambassador to Egypt Michael Bock has clarified his country's position during a small press meeting attended by Ahram Online Wednesday at the German Embassy in Cairo following a contentious statement made by the German foreign ministry calling for the release of deposed president Mohamed Morsi. The statement was widely condemned among Egyptians amidst ongoing political upheaval between supporters and opponents of Morsi’s removal. "We call for an end to the restrictions on Mr Morsi's whereabouts and suggest a trusted institution be granted access to Morsi," stated a German foreign ministry spokesman Friday, identifying the International Committee...
(Ahram Online 07/18/13)
Social justice, subsidised bread, fuel, and security among the many boxes to be ticked by the new cabinet's economic team. Egypt's new interim cabinet, headed by Prime Minister Hazem El-Beblawi, was sworn in on Tuesday amid economic challenges which require a government able to bolster the country's financial image. Several of the newly-appointed ministers have already stated their respective priorities in their initial statements. Finance minister Ahmed Galal said that financial discipline and achieving a balanced economy to create more job opportunities top his to-do list. The liberal economist pointed out that his ministry will also seek to accomplish social justice in such a way that the benefits of domestic growth are distributed fairly among all segments of Egyptian society...
(Boston.com 07/18/13)
The head of Egypt’s military, Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, sat with a polite smile in the front row listening to President Mohammed Morsi give a 2 1/2-hour speech defending his year in office. El-Sissi even clapped lightly as the audience of Morsi supporters broke into cheers. It was a calculating display of cool by an army general plotting the overthrow of his commander in chief. Just over a week later, el-Sissi slid in the knife, announcing Morsi’s ouster on state TV on July 3 as troops took the Islamist leader into custody. The move was the culmination of nearly a year of acrimonious relations between el-Sissi and Egypt’s first freely elected — and first civilian — president. A series of interviews...
(Los Angeles Times 07/18/13)
The military represents stability amid turmoil. Even as many are willing to overlook its transgressions, the military appears eager not to repeat mistakes. The young recruits with rifles and ragged duffels will never see the swimming pools of the officers clubs that line the boulevards of Cairo. They will not profit from the Egyptian military's network of private business interests. They'll eat beans and bread and earn about $30 a month. But they will be respected as men who protect the homeland — from foreign enemies and sometimes from itself. A military coup in most nations would signal alarm about the country's future. In Egypt, much of the country cheered. The military stands for the stability many long for amid...
(Huffingtonpost 07/18/13)
Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi obviously failed, but it is far from certain that his successors will succeed. For they, like Morsi, face a difficult -- some might say impossible -- choice with respect to the Egyptian economy: do what is right and sacrifice popular support... or do what is popular and sacrifice the economy. If Morsi had done the 'right' thing he would have reformed the massive network of food and fuel subsidies that support large segments of the Egyptian populace. That is what the International Monetary Fund wanted him to do as a condition of receiving a $4.8 billion emergency loan. The 'popular' course was to keep the subsidies firmly in place. In reality, 'Morsi's choice' may have been...
(Washington Post 07/18/13)
CAIRO — Several hundred supporters of Egypt’s deposed president massed outside the cabinet building in Cairo on Wednesday, expanding their protests against the country’s new government and demanding the reinstatement of Islamist leader Mohamed Morsi. The rally came as the European Union’s top foreign policy official met with Egypt’s interim leaders, the second senior Western official to visit the country this week. The demonstrators, carrying posters of Morsi and chanting slogans against the military, called the new leadership illegitimate. Morsi, an Islamist and the country’s first democratically elected president, was ousted by the military two weeks ago. Security forces barred the protesters from reaching the cabinet building, but the demonstrators painted graffiti on the walls calling Gen. Abdel Fatah al-Sissi,...
(The Wall Street Journal 07/18/13)
Former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi and other political prisoners should be released and the country must move quickly to elections, European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton urged Wednesday on a visit to Cairo. Baroness Ashton, on her third trip to Cairo since April, met with Egypt's new interim president and prime minister as well as the recently sworn-in vice president and foreign and defense ministers. She also met with officials from the Freedom and Justice Party, the political arm of the Muslim Brotherhood, Mr. Morsi's former prime minister and leaders from Tamarod, a youth petition movement that played a key role in protests against Mr. Morsi's government. At a press conference Wednesday evening, Baroness Ashton said she had stressed...
(AFP (eng) 07/17/13)
Gunmen attacked an Egyptian army checkpoint in the Sinai border town of Rafah wounding eight people, security sources said Wednesday, as troops massed for an offensive against Islamist militants in the restive region. The attackers fired rocket-propelled grenades at the checkpoint in a residential area of Rafah late on Tuesday, before fleeing in their all-terrain vehicle, the sources said. Six soldiers were wounded in the attack as were two civilians, including a 31-year-old man who was hit in the head by a bullet as he fled the scene. Since the ouster by the army of president Mohamed Morsi on July 3, militant groups have launched almost daily attacks on troops and police in the increasingly lawless peninsula, killing several members...
(AFP (eng) 07/17/13)
CAIRO (AFP) – The European Union's top diplomat was heading for Cairo Wednesday, a day after an interim government was sworn in to replace Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, toppled by the military two weeks ago. Announcing the surprise visit, the office of EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said her visit was to press the case for a swift return to democratic rule. "I am going to Egypt to reinforce our message that there must be a fully inclusive political process, taking in all groups which support democracy," Ashton said. Both the Muslim Brotherhood, the influential movement from which Morsi hails, and the ultra-conservative Al-Nur party refused to take part in the new administration. Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad immediately rejected...
(Voice of America 07/17/13)
CAIRO — Members of Egypt's new military-backed interim government took the oath of office Tuesday, following violence overnight between police and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi. The new Egyptian interim cabinet was sworn in before interim President Adly Mansour in a ceremony at the presidential palace. The new ministers vowed to defend Egypt's constitution, its republican form of government and its borders. Veteran economist Hazem el Beblawi, who heads the new cabinet, was the first to be sworn in. Defense Minister Abdel Fattah el Sissi, the military leader who was key in ousting President Mohamed Morsi, continues in his post and becomes first deputy prime minister. The new interim government is a mix of political figures and technocrats. The...
(AFP (eng) 07/17/13)
The European Union's top diplomat was heading for Cairo Wednesday, a day after an interim government was sworn in to replace Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, toppled by the military two weeks ago. Announcing the surprise visit, the office of EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said her visit was to press the case for a swift return to democratic rule. "I am going to Egypt to reinforce our message that there must be a fully inclusive political process, taking in all groups which support democracy," Ashton said. Both the Muslim Brotherhood, the influential movement from which Morsi hails, and the ultra-conservative Al-Nur party refused to take part in the new administration. Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad immediately rejected the 35-member cabinet...
(NPR 07/17/13)
After what had been a week of calm, violence returned to the streets of Cairo late Monday into early Tuesday. NPR's Leila Fadel reports that Egypt's health ministry said seven people were killed and more than 200 were injured as supporters of clashed with police. From Cairo, Leila filed this report for our Newscast unit: "Police fired teargas and birdshot at protesters in Cairo's Ramses Square where supporters of the president gathered to demand Morsi's reinstatement. The Muslim Brotherhood-led marches went throughout the city in what protesters called a peaceful escalation. They put up roadblocks and used walls of protesters to cut off streets and bridges. "The bloody event came as Egypt's military-installed leaders are rushing to put together a...
(AFP (eng) 07/17/13)
Egypt's new caretaker cabinet got down to work on Wednesday faced with a raft of daunting challenges including restoring security, as the Muslim Brotherhood of ousted president Mohamed Morsi vowed fresh demonstrations. On the interim leaders' agenda was a series of meetings with EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton, who flew into Cairo Wednesday to press the case for a swift return to democratic rule in Egypt. The influential Brotherhood, which along with the ultra-conservative Al-Nur party has refused to take part in the new administration, said it had called a new round of pro-Morsi protests in the capital later on Wednesday. Ashton was to meet interim president Adly Mansour, prime minister Hazem Beblawi, foreign minister Nabil Fahmy and army...
(The New York Times 07/17/13)
CAIRO — Egypt’s interim president swore in a new cabinet on Tuesday that was dominated by liberal and leftist politicians, sweeping away the brief era of Islamist political rule built by the country’s deposed president, Mohamed Morsi. Not one of the 34 cabinet members belongs to the Muslim Brotherhood, the 80-year-old Islamist movement that propelled Mr. Morsi to the presidency a year ago, or to any other Islamist party. The cabinet does include three women and three Coptic Christians, making it slightly more diverse, in some respects, than Mr. Morsi’s cabinet. Egypt’s defense minister, Gen. Abdul-Fattah el-Sisi, who has emerged as the country’s de facto leader since Mr. Morsi’s ouster two weeks ago, added the title of deputy to the...
(NBC News 07/17/13)
CAIRO — Egypt swore in its first Cabinet on Tuesday since President Mohammed Morsi was thrown out of office, putting relative liberals in charge of key ministries and shutting out Islamists that were elected into power last year. The head of the armed forces who ousted Morsi on July 3, Army Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, was sworn in first deputy prime minister in the interim government of Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi, 76, a liberal economist. El-Sissi will also remain defense minister, Al-Jazeera and the English-language version of the independent newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm reported. Nabil Fahmy, a familiar face to the U.S. as Egypt's ambassador to Washington from 1999 to 2008, is the new foreign minister. Interim President Adly Mansour swore in...
(The Jerusalem Post 07/17/13)
The security situation in Sinai appears to be pulling Egypt's new military regime closer with Israel, which is not hesitating to embrace the newly minted power players in Cairo. Egypt’s new military-backed leadership can count on Israel for support; relieved that the Muslim Brotherhood regime is gone, Israel is willing to be flexible when it comes to the limits imposed by the 1979 peace treaty. The approval of an Egyptian request to deal with the terrorist threat in Sinai by moving more forces into the peninsula shows that Israel is not hesitating to embrace the newly minted power players in Cairo. As the Muslim world continues to be engulfed and divided by intra-Muslim warfare – whether between Shi’ites and Sunnis,...
(The Globe and Mail 07/17/13)
Egyptian officials announced a new government Tuesday that excluded members of the country’s influential Islamist parties, including the Muslim Brotherhood, and appeared to give an expanded role to the country’s powerful military chief. The new cabinet, led by one of Egypt’s most prominent economists, replaces the government of President Mohammed Morsi, who was deposed by the military nearly two weeks ago after mass protests against his rule. The formation of the government is part of a military-led transition plan that is supposed to lead to parliamentary elections within six months. Analysts praised the diversity of the new Cabinet, which included three women, and said it was well qualified to tackle Egypt’s escalating crises, including an economy in free-fall. At the...
(NBC News 07/17/13)
CAIRO — Egyptian police and protesters clashed in central Cairo early on Tuesday after fights broke out between supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi and locals angered when they tried to block major thoroughfares crossing the River Nile. The MENA state news agency said at least 22 people were injured in the violence, which began just after 9 p.m. (3 p.m. ET) on Monday and lasted into the early hours of Tuesday. The clashes were smaller and more localized than the earlier deadly unrest since Morsi was deposed by the military on July 3, and most of Cairo was unaffected. Still, after a week of relative calm, scenes of running street battles close to the Egyptian Museum, one of...
(Ahram Online 07/17/13)
Ethiopia lower house speaker Aba Dula Gemada reminds Egypt that treaty removing colonial-era water rights now ratified into Ethiopian law. Ethiopia is committed to guaranteeing the water interests of both Nile basin states and Egypt, said Aba Dula Gemeda, Ethiopia’s lower house speaker, according to Egypt's state-run news agency MENA on Wednesday. "Some elements on the Egyptian side publish inaccurate information about the Renaissance Dam, but Ethiopia is gaining the international community’s support," Gemeda said. Gemeda emphasised Addis Ababa’s eagerness to achieve economic cooperation with Egypt along with an "equitable sharing of water resources," pointing out that the Cooperative Framework Agreement (CFA) has been signed into Ethiopian law. The CFA replaces a colonial-era agreement that granted Egypt and Sudan the...
( 07/17/13)
Africa’s oil and gas industry is poised for momentous growth despite its grappling with severe stresses of a challenging economic and political environment on the continent, fuelled by poor physical infrastructure, corruption, an uncertain regulatory framework, and a lack of skills, according to a review issued by PwC. PwC’s ‘Africa oil and gas review’ of developments in the African oil and gas industry is the third in a series of reviews of the sector by the tax, assurance and advisory solutions firm. Uyi Akpata, PwC Africa oil and gas industry leader/deputy country senior partner, Nigeria, says: “The challenges facing oil and gas companies operating in Africa are diverse and numerous. Political interference, uncertainty and delays in passing laws, energy policies...

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