Wednesday 13 December 2017
(New Business Ethiopia 06/26/13)
Ethiopia launches a two and half year revised National Nutrition Program (NNP) to reduce of stunting from 44 to 30 percent, underweight from 29 to 21 percent and wasting from 10 to 3 percent by 2015. The revised NNP, which is estimated to cost 547 million US dollars to implement, aims to provide the policy platform for all NNP Implementing sectors to boost key nutrition interventions. It further targets to strengthen multi-sectoral coordination and follow the life-cycle approach to map key actions needed to improve nutritional status. Despite some improvements over the last 5 years from 2005 to 2011 (stunting declined from 52 to 44 percent, underweight dropped from 33 to 29 percent and wasting reduced from 12 to 10...
(Addis Fortune 06/26/13)
A seed of change in culture and momentum seems to have taken root at the Ethiopian Foreign Ministry, being led by Tedros Adhanom (PhD), one of the progressive EPRDFites, with a historic confidence of facing the gruelling heat of the public space on Twitter - a social networking website - day in and day out. Under the leadership of Tedros, the Foreign Ministry has become aggressive in defending the affairs of the state - both local and international - through incessant streams of updates on Facebook and 'tweets' on Twitter. Often conceived as an old traditional house of veteran diplomatic minds, the Ministry has now opened itself up to the changing trend of diplomacy and international relations. Of course, the...
(Voice of America 06/26/13)
GENEVA — Hunger costs Ethiopia billions of dollars in yearly economic losses, according to a new study. Led by the African Union Commission, the UN World Food Program (WFP) and Ethiopian government agencies, it says reducing undernutrition will save lives and boost Ethiopia's struggling economy. The study shows Ethiopia lost an estimated $4.7 billion in 2009 because of child undernutrition. This is equivalent to 16.5 percent of the country's Gross Domestic Product. Currently, the report finds more than two out of every five children in Ethiopia are stunted and more than 80 percent of all cases of child under-nutrition go untreated. It says malnutrition in Ethiopia causes more than 20 percent of child deaths. It says these deaths have reduced...
(International Business Times 06/26/13)
The drums of war are beating again in the Middle East and the Horn of Africa. But this confrontation doesn’t concern Syria, Somalia, Israel or the Palestinians. The adversaries are Egypt and Ethiopia. The flashpoint is the waters of the Nile. As part of the construction of its Grand Renaissance Dam, Ethiopia began partially diverting the course of the Blue Nile, which joins the White Nile in Sudan before flowing on to Egypt, in late May. For Ethiopia, the 6,000-megawatt Grand Renaissance project -- the largest hydroelectric plant in Africa -- promises power for the 83 percent of the population lacking access to electricity, as well as energy for export. For Egypt, though, the dam raises an existential alarm. Egypt...
(UN.org 06/26/13)
New HIV infections among children have been reduced by 50 per cent or more in seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa, the United Nations agency spearheading the global AIDS response said today. Botswana, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, and Zambia have reduced new HIV infections among children by half since 2009, while Tanzania and Zimbabwe are also making substantial progress. This is according to the latest progress report on the Global Plan towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children by 2015 and keeping their mothers alive (Global Plan), which was launched in July 2011 at the UN General Assembly High-level Meeting on AIDS. The Plan has two main targets for 2015: a 90 per cent reduction in the...
(Daily News Egypt 06/25/13)
An Ethiopian delegation will meet Egyptian Deputy Foreign Minister for African Affairs Ali Al-Hefni on Wednesday, according to a ministry statement released on Monday. The statement announced that meeting, convened at the invitation of The Egyptian Council for Foreign Affairs, comes as part of developing bi-lateral relations in various fields including the academic field. The delegation includes both Ethiopian diplomats and academics. State-run agency MENA reported that during its 3-day visit, the Ethiopian delegation, led by Sebhat Nega, the Executive Director of the Ethiopian International Institute for Peace and Development (EIIPD) will discuss with officials issues of mutual concern, as well as security issues faced on the African continent. Egyptian Ambassador to Ethiopia Mohamed Idris said the delegation’s visit comes...
(Ethiopian Radio and Television Agency 06/25/13)
Tendaho Sugar Factory would begin production test in five months, the Ethiopian Sugar Corporation has said. The planting of sugarcane and the factory are being carried out side by side. Tendaho Sugar Factory which is expected to produce over 619 thousand tons of sugar annually has been under construction in Afar Region. The sugarcane development for the factory is expected to cover 50 thousand hectares of land eventually. Director General of the Ethiopian Sugar Corporation, Abay Tsehaye has said out of the land for sugarcane development sated above, over 10.5 thousand hectares is already covered. Sugar production Team Leader of the Factory engineer Tekefa Assefa for his part said Indian professionals with best experience in the sector are undertaking the...
(Ethiopian Radio and Television Agency 06/25/13)
The House of People’s Representatives approved on Tuesday $50 million loan agreement for implementation of a project aimed at preventing recurrent drought in Ethiopia. The House on its 36th regular meeting also endorsed a draft bill for Ethiopian Human Rights Commission to open branch offices in two regional states. The House unanimously approved the loan agreement with the African Development Fund for implementation of the stated project. The loan is interest free and will be paid back within 40 years. The House also unanimously endorsed the draft bill providing for establishment of human rights branch offices in Benishangul Gumuz and Afar States. The House also same day referred to the pertinent standing committees the draft bill providing for re-establishment of...
(Daily Monitor 06/25/13)
President Museveni seemed to throw diplomacy to the wind when during the budget reading on June 13 he referred to attempts by the government of Egypt to stop the building of a mega hydro power dam on the Nile as chauvinistic. But he is not alone. Many observers say that it is not only Egypt’s position on the use of the Nile waters which is untenable. They now also disapprove of the way the North African country has responded to the fallout from comments made by different Egyptian political leaders during a “national dialogue” about the Nile. Egypt’s foreign Affairs Minister, Mr Kamel Amr, rushed to Ethiopia to cool the tempers and at the end of his visit last Tuesday,...
(National Mirror Online 06/25/13)
Africa has lost at least $200 billion in five decades to illegal fishing and another $100 billion in illegal bunkering since 2003. Speaking at the opening of the Summit of Heads of States and Governments of the Economic Community of Central African States, ECCAS, the Economic Community of West African States, ECOWAS, and the Gulf of Guinea Commission, GGC, the African Union Commission Chairperson, Nkosazana Dlamini- Zuma, warned that such incursion should not be allowed to continue. The summit with focus on maritime safety and security in the Gulf of Guinea opened yesterday in Yaoundé, the Cameroonian capital with President Goodluck Jonathan in attendance, among 25 other African leaders. Jonathan, who had last week raised serious concern over crude oil...
(Business Day 06/24/13)
ADDIS ABABA — Ethiopia should ensure private industry and business has sufficient access to finance in the state-dominated economy to keep growth rates up and shift from a heavy reliance on agriculture, the World Bank said. The Horn of Africa nation with its strongly state-interventionist policies has one of the world’s fastest-growing economies. The government expects growth of 10% in the fiscal year ending in July, boosted by rising agricultural output. Industry, however, accounts for only about 10% of gross domestic product, while major sectors of the economy such as banking and telecoms remain in state hands. World Bank country director Guang Z Chen said Ethiopia should adjust policy to expand the private sector to meet a goal of middle-income...
(Business Week 06/24/13)
On June 26, Barack Obama is making his first trip to Africa as America’s president. It’s questionable whether the trip is worth it—and not just because, as the Washington Post guesstimated, the trip’s price tag is as high as $100 million, including costs for fighter jet coverage as the First Family tours around. (That’s equivalent to two months of government health spending in Tanzania, a country of 46 million people.) A week of presidential visits to Robben Island and glad-handing local leaders will mean little if the U.S. doesn’t change policies to engage with the region more seriously. According to the U.S. Ambassador to Tanzania, Obama’s trip to Africa, five years into his presidency, will focus on economic cooperation, strengthening...
(AFP (eng) 06/24/13)
When Tadiwos Belete moved to Ethiopia from the United States a decade ago to open a luxury spa, his relatives thought he was crazy. He built an office block on a crumbling congested thoroughfare in the centre of Addis Ababa, where there were few other businesses and seemingly few opportunities for a successful entrepreneur. Now from his fourth floor office overlooking the newly-refurbished, six-lane Bole Road, today crammed with cafes, hotels and shopping centres -- a sign of Ethiopia's thriving economy -- Tadiwos recalls almost despairing of finding other businesses to rent space in his office block. "I remember, we were almost praying whether we could get someone to rent this building," Tadiwos said. "It's amazing, I never believed it...
(Sudan Tribune 06/24/13)
Eritrean refugees crossing to neighbouring Ethiopia are on the rise, while the number entering Sudan has dropped compared to the previous year, according to the United Nation Higher Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Eritrean refugees flee to Ethiopia in larger numbers via 16 entry points where they get primary assistance and provided with temporary shelters before they are transferred to one of the many refugee camps in the country’s two bordering regions, Tigrai and Afar. Since January, the UNHCR and the government’s refugee agency, the Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs (ARRA), have registered over 4,000 Eritrean refugees. Currently Ethiopia hosts a record high nearly 72,000 Eritrean refugees in four camps in the northern Tigrai region and two others in the...
(Ventures-Africa 06/24/13)
VENTURES AFRICA – Try trading Ethiopian birr (ETB) for American dollars (USD). You have to call one guy who calls another guy, says Messai, and then suddenly someone is at your door with the dollars you requested. New regulations on how many dollars a local bank can provide a person traveling outside the country has boosted the local informal market for dollars. Banking in East Africa can be an adventure in all sense of the word. In Tanzania, banking penetration sits just under 20 percent. In a working paper by the World Bank, 47 percent cited distance as a reason for not having an account. The country also ranked near bottom in bank branch penetration, averaging less than 0.5 bank...
(Africa Review 06/24/13)
At first it might not look like it, but the exchanges between Egypt and Ethiopia over the latter’s Renaissance Dam that the region witnessed these past two weeks, tell us a lot about the tensions defining what the East African Community will look like in the years to come. The dam on the River Nile, which Addis Ababa projects will cost $4.7 billion, will produce 6,000 Megawatts of power when fully developed, making it the largest hydroelectric power plant in Africa, and the 14th largest in the world. Egypt, which has in the past threatened to go to war over its “rights” to the Nile’s waters, issued a stern warning. Egypt’s Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation Mohamed Bahaa-Eddin, arguing...
(AFP (eng) 06/24/13)
JOHANNESBURG, June 24, 2013 (AFP) - Nelson Mandela was critically ill in hospital on Monday after his condition suddenly deteriorated, leaving South Africans anxiously awaiting the latest news of their revered anti-apartheid icon. "The condition of former president Nelson Mandela, who is still in hospital in Pretoria, has become critical," presidential spokesman Mac Maharaj said in a statement late Sunday. The frail 94-year-old was admitted to hospital over two weeks ago, in the early hours of June 8, for treatment for a lung infection. But after intensive treatment at Pretoria's Mediclinic Heart Hospital and some signs of improvement, his condition deteriorated. President Jacob Zuma visited Mandela on Sunday evening and was told by doctors "that the former president's condition had...
(Bloomberg 06/24/13)
Ethiopia is building a giant hydropower dam on the Nile. The project, however, makes Egypt unhappy, as its water supply could be threatened. Though both countries could find ways to benefit from the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, neither has displayed exemplary conflict-management skills. In Egypt, politicians meeting with President Mohamed Mursi suggested subverting Ethiopia’s government and destroying the dam. On live TV. Later, Mursi pledged to “defend each drop of the Nile with our blood.” For its part, Ethiopia, home to the main sources of the Nile, has been steadfast in ignoring the understandable concerns of Egypt, a desert country that depends on the river for 95 percent of its water. When Ethiopia began construction of the biggest hydropower facility...
(AFP (eng) 06/22/13)
JOHANNESBURG, June 22, 2013 (AFP) - The ambulance that rushed Nelson Mandela to hospital two weeks ago broke down and another had to be called, but the mishap did not endanger the anti-apartheid hero, the South African presidency said Saturday. "All care was taken to ensure that the former president's medical condition was not compromised by the unforeseen incident," presidential spokesman Mac Maharaj told AFP. The ambulance had engine trouble on its way from the 94-year-old Mandela's Johannesburg home to a specialist heart clinic in Pretoria, some 55 kilometres (30 miles) away. Doctors are "satisfied" that Mandela, who is battling a serious lung infection, suffered no harm during the wait for a replacement ambulance, Maharaj said. Maharaj said the "fully...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/21/13)
(Reuters) - Ethiopia should ensure private industry and business has sufficient access to finance in the state-dominated economy to keep growth rates up and shift from a heavy reliance on agriculture, the World Bank said. The Horn of Africa nation with its strongly state-interventionist policies has one of the world's fastest-growing economies. The government expects growth of 10 percent in the fiscal year ending next month, boosted by rising agricultural output. Industry, however, accounts for only about 10 percent of gross domestic product, while major sectors of the economy such as banking and telecoms remain in state hands. Guang Z. Chen, the World Bank's country director, said Ethiopia should adjust policy to expand the private sector to meet a goal...

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