Tuesday 20 February 2018
(AFP (eng) 11/18/17)
he African Union on Friday called for Libyan authorities to investigate "slave markets" of black Africans operating in the conflict-torn nation, following the release of shocking images showing the sale of young men. The demand follows the release of CNN footage of a live auction in Libya where black youths are presented to north African buyers as potential farmhands and sold off for as little as $400. Guinean President Alpha Conde, who is also Chairman of the African Union, demanded an enquiry and prosecutions relating to what he termed a "despicable trade... from another era". Meanwhile Senegal's government. commenting on Facebook, expressed "outrage at the sale of Sub-Saharan African migrants on Libyan soil,"...
(Xinhuanet 11/17/17)
The Ethiopian Ministry of Education (MoE) on Thursday warned legal action against higher education students who interrupt normal educational classes at universities. Tilaye Gete, Minister of Education, said in a press conference that some universities especially Metu and Ambo in Ethiopia's central Oromia regional state have had their normal educational classes interrupted by unrest instigated by a small group of students. Gete said students who have grievances should follow legal ways, while urging school staff and students' parents to help smooth learning process in universities. "Consultations are underway with students and stakeholders to resolve the problems that occurred in Metu, Ambo and other higher learning institution," the minister said. Ethiopia's higher education institutions have been hotbeds of dissent since the...
(Xinhuanet 11/17/17)
Sino-African relations have entered a new development stage of win-win cooperation, according to the fifth Biennial Conference of China-Africa Industrial Forum (CAIF) that opened here Thursday. Supporting Africa's industrialization and capacity cooperation are of vital importance in the next five years and Sino-African trade is likely to total 180 billion U.S. dollars in 2017, said CAIF secretary general Cheng Zhigang in the opening speech. Sino-African economic and trade cooperation has great potential, said Cheng. China has been Africa's largest trading partner since 2009. Chinese investments in Africa exceeded 100 billion dollars in 2016, about 50 times as much as in 2010. China's investments in Africa have also diversified in business areas, from construction and mining to emerging industries such as...
(AFP (eng) 11/17/17)
Africa is making only faltering progress towards food and nutrition security, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has warned. "Multiple forms of malnutrition coexist, with countries experiencing simultaneously high rates of child undernutrition or anaemia as well as high rates of obesity," it says in a new report, Regional Overview of Food Security and Nutrition. In sub-Saharan Africa, "progress towards the World Health Assembly global nutrition targets has been generally poor," the Rome-based agency says, referring to goals to end hunger by 2025. The annual document came out Thursday at the start of a two-day food and health seminar in Ivory Coast's economic capital, Abidjan. Around 200 people from 47 African nations are gathered to discuss "sustainable food systems...
(AFP (eng) 11/16/17)
There's one room at the Sheno primary school in rural Ethiopia that's different from all the others, starting with the sign over the door reading: "Menstruation is a gift from God." Inside this converted classroom, boys and girls gather in what some pupils call the "girls' club" to break one of the country's most enduring taboos: talking about periods. In Ethiopia, adolescent girls are generally left to muddle through puberty on their own without guidance or the means to buy sanitary pads. Only 54 percent of Ethiopian girls finish primary school, according to the United Nations children's fund, UNICEF, and many abandon it because of cramps or embarrassing mishaps during their periods. With child marriage prevalent in rural areas, local...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/14/17)
DUBAI (Reuters) - Ethiopian Airlines would be interested in buying around 10 to 20 of the mid-sized jets that Boeing is studying whether to develop, the African airline’s chief executive said on Tuesday. Boeing is looking at potentially filling a market gap between narrow and wide-body jets with a new aircraft that could seat 220 to 270 passengers. Ethiopian Chief Executive Tewolde Gebremariam said the airline was interested in a replacement for the out-of-production Boeing 757. “It is a very right size, and right range for the missions we have, especially (for) the altitude in Addis (Ababa) airport,” he told reporters at the Dubai Airshow. Boeing stopped producing the 757 in 2005, after delivering 1,049 of the jets, known for...
(APA 11/14/17)
Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan have failed to reach a watershed deal on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), a project Cairo fears would reduce its share of vital waters from the Nile River. Upon completion, GERD will be Africa’s largest dam with 6,450 MW installed power generating capacity. It is being built for an estimated cost of 4.7 billion US dollars. The disagreement came after the Water ministers of Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt held their 7th joint meeting on 11 and 12 November 2017 in Cairo, Egypt, APA learned in Addis Ababa on Monday. The meeting was a continuation of the talks held on October 18, 2017 in Addis Ababa, aimed at discussing and reaching agreement on agendas not yet...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/14/17)
KIGALI (Reuters) - The global airline industry has $1.2 billion blocked in nine dollar-strapped African countries, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) said on Monday. The global commodities price crash that began in 2014 hit economies across Africa hard, particularly big resource exporters such as Angola and Nigeria. Low oil and mineral prices have reduced government revenue and caused chronic dollar shortages and immense pressure on local currencies. The fiscal slump has meant governments have not allowed foreign airlines to repatriate their dollar profits in full. At an aviation meeting in the Rwandan capital, IATA’s Vice President for Africa, Raphale Kuuchi, said that airlines were in talks with “a few governments to unblock airline funds”. He did not specify the...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/13/17)
ARGOBA, Ethiopia (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Armed with a spear and undeterred by the intense sunlight, Tarekegn Kareto meticulously plucks weeds in his maize field in Argoba village, in southern Ethiopia. “With both dry weather and unusually heavy rains hitting us in the past year, I’ve lost over half of my harvest of maize and sorghum,” he said, pausing to wipe sweat off his forehead. “That means I’ve had to dip into my crop reserves – which I can no longer sell for extra income – or even rely on neighbors’ charity for food,” he added. Prolonged drought and erratic rainfall across the country have hit harvests...
(AFP (eng) 11/13/17)
Ministers from 13 European and African countries on Monday pledged steps to ease the migrant crisis around the Mediterranean, vowing especially to improve conditions for migrants held in Libya. Interior ministers and other representatives from countries impacted by the ongoing wave of migration up through Africa towards Europe, including Libya, voiced deep concern over the "ongoing human tragedy" along the so-called Central Mediterranean route. "The participants intend to address the challenges posed by the alarming situation along the migration route to North Africa," Switzerland, which hosted the third meeting of the so-called contact group on the crisis, said in a statement. Thousands of migrants and refugees who attempt to travel along this route "find themselves in catastrophic situations," it said,...
(AfricaNews 11/10/17)
Ethiopian Prime Minister has spoken on the anti-corruption crackdown by Saudi Arabia. Hailemariam Desalegn said Addis Ababa was diplomatically following the issue especially as a national has been named. Mohammed Hussein Al Amoudi, an Ethiopian – born business mogul is part of the detained persons named late last week. But Premier Desalegn told local media in a briefing on Thursday that the government believes that Al Amoudi’s investments in the country will not be affected. The 71-year-old is currently under detention along with 11 Saudi princes, four current ministers and a number of former ministers. Saudi-owned Al Arabiya television said the probe is headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.
(AfricaNews 11/08/17)
Egypt, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Ethiopia are the three top African countries who will be affected by a move by the United States to cancel a visa lottery regime. Figures from the Department of State indicates that the three countries had over 2,000 beneficiaries enter the U.S. through the annual lottery program for the year 2016. The document titled, “Immigrant Number Use for Visa Issuances and Adjustments of Status in the Diversity Immigrant Category,” gave an analysis of DV beneficiaries spanning the years 2007 – 2016. For last year, Egypt’s figure of 2,855 was tops followed by DRC’s 2,778 and Ethiopia’s 2,143. Other African countries that managed to stay in the 1000+ bracket were; Sudan, Liberia, Cameroon,...
(AFP (eng) 11/08/17)
A dozen other students look on as Umar Amadu uses a glass pipette to draw a solution from a conical flask as part of a chemistry experiment. It could be a scene from any school laboratory around the world, but until two months ago Amadu and his fellow students had no access to any science equipment. Science subjects at his rural secondary school outside the city of Katsina in northern Nigeria were taught using theory only. But now they have all the kit they need to put theory into practice, thanks to a mobile science lab that tours selected state schools. "It's an exciting experience. We were being taught only the theoretical aspect of science subjects," Amadu, who wants to...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/07/17)
CAPE TOWN (Reuters) - Ride-hailing service Uber Technologies Inc. [UBER.UL] is growing rapidly in sub-Saharan Africa and considering moves into more markets, despite sometimes violent opposition from metered taxi drivers, a senior executive said on Tuesday. Uber’s service has triggered protests by rivals from London to New Delhi as it up-ends traditional business models that require professional drivers to pay steep licensing fees to do business. “We are bullish on Africa. The growth here is still substantial and we think that given the right regulatory environment, the growth could be even better,” Justin Spratt, head of business development for the sub-Saharan region, told Reuters. “Africa’s growth thus far has been faster than America and a large part of that is...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/06/17)
JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Africa’s mobile internet connections are set to double in the next five years, a study showed on Monday, thanks to affordable smartphones and the roll-out of high-speed networks. A report by research and consulting firm Ovum in London estimates that mobile broadband connections will rise from 419 million at the end of this year to 1.07 billion by the end of 2022. “Data connectivity is growing strongly in Africa, and there are also good prospects on the continent in areas such as digital media, mobile financial services, and the Internet of Things,” said Matthew Reed, Practice Leader Middle East and Africa at Ovum. “But as Africa’s TMT market becomes more convergent and complex, service providers are under...
(AFP (eng) 11/03/17)
A Dutch-Ethiopian accused of war crimes committed during Ethiopia's bloody purges in the late 1970s told a Dutch court Thursday that he apologised for atrocities by the regime but had no personal involvement in them. "I would apologise on my knees to all these victims and through them to all of the people of Ethiopia," Eshetu Alemu told The Hague District Court. "But I do not recognise the role that has been assigned to me personally," Alemu said after listening to testimony from victims who told of torture, murder and bodies dumped in a mass grave. Alemu, a long-time Dutch resident, is alleged to have been a henchman for former Marxist dictator Mengistu...
(AFP (eng) 11/03/17)
US politicians are voicing concern over America's growing military presence across Africa, where they worry the Pentagon is getting ever more embroiled in a secretive campaign against a shifting enemy. Last month's killing of four US soldiers in a Niger ambush has thrust the issue into the spotlight, with lawmakers calling for greater transparency on what is going on in Africa. "The footprint in Africa is much bigger than the American public understands," Democratic Senator Tim Kaine said this week. The Niger ambush has also rekindled debate over the legal authorities the Pentagon uses to fight jihadist groups overseas, particularly in Africa where about 6,000 US troops are deployed across the vast continent. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis this week faced...
(Xinhuanet 10/31/17)
The Ethiopia Federal High Court fourth criminal bench on Monday granted bail for deputy chairman of opposition party Oromo Federalist Congress (OFC), Bekele Gerba, who has been in prison for nearly two years. OFC is the main opposition party to the ruling coalition Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) in the restive central Oromia regional state. The court approved a 1,110 U.S. dollar bail for Gerba, who is facing terrorism charges, with the charges to be heard with him being outside prison provided he meet the bail requirements. Oromia, Ethiopia's largest regional state, has seen large anti-government protests by ethnic Oromos since the end of 2015, leaving hundreds of dead. A martial law declared in October 2016 was lifted in...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/31/17)
HARARE (Reuters) - Economic growth is expected to rise to 3.4 percent in sub-Saharan Africa next year from 2.6 percent in 2017, the IMF said in a report on Monday, but warned that rising debt and political risks in larger economies would weigh down future growth. Nigeria and South African are the biggest economies in Africa south of the Sahara, but both nations have been clouded by political uncertainty linked to the tenure of their leaders. The IMF said a good harvest and recovery in oil output in Nigeria would contribute more than half of the growth in the region this year while an uptick in mining and a better harvest in South Africa as well as a rebound in...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/30/17)
ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) - An Ethiopian opposition leader was due to be released on bail almost two years after he was detained during mass protests over land rights, a member of his party said on Monday. Bekele Gerba, secretary general of the Oromo Federalist Congress, was arrested in December 2015 as activists stepped up demonstrations accusing the government of seizing their land and passing it on to firms and developers. Violence went on to spread across the Oromiya province that surrounds the capital Addis Ababa and is home to many foreign-owned businesses, drawn in by the government’s industrialisation push. Bekele would walk free late Monday or early Tuesday after the high court granted him 30,000 birr ($1,110) bail, the party’s...

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