Tuesday 27 June 2017
(The Ethiopian Herald 03/17/17)
Ethiopia and Russia signed Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on Tourism and Culture and Protocol of the Intergovernmental Commission on Economic, Scientific, Technical and Trade Cooperation yesterday at the end of the 6th Meeting of the Intergovernmental Ethio-Russia Commission. The Ethio-Russia joint technical committee also agreed to boost the two countries trade exchange and diversify tradable commodities in both countries' markets. Following the signing ceremony, Co-Chair of the Commission and Minister of Cabinet Affairs Alemayehu Tegenu said the meeting was so crucial for Ethiopia in terms of expediting and taking additional measures to enhance its multifaceted cooperation with Russia. The co-chair stated that the two countries agreed to diversify areas of cooperation in trade and investment fields and to establish industrial,...
(Voice of America 03/17/17)
One of the enduring legacies of the Barack Obama presidency will be the relationship built between the United States and young Africans. As part of Obama’s Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI), each year 1,000 young people from sub-Saharan Africa travel to the United States to spend six weeks at a U.S. college or university. The program will continue this summer. But building enduring relationships is a two-way street, and many in Africa want to see Americans coming to their continent as well. That’s what 26 Americans selected to participate in a Reciprocal Exchange program, a new component of the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, are now planning to do. The U.S. Department of State partnered with IREX, a...
(Xinhuanet 03/16/17)
China's aid to the education sector in Africa is helping boost teacher training, a key component in skilling the population to fast track development, a UN official has said. Ann Therese Ndong-Jatta, Director of United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Regional Office for Eastern Africa, in an interview recognized China's contribution to Africa's education sector over the years. "We value the initiative in teacher training in Uganda and other countries in Africa. This will revitalize the teaching profession," she said. China through UNESCO donated equipment to three teacher training institutions in Uganda on March 3. Figures from the Chinese embassy here show that 137 tutors were trained and 272 pieces of Information Communication and Technology and studio equipment...
(AFP (eng) 03/16/17)
Africa will host a Commonwealth Games one day despite the blow of Durban being stripped of hosting the 2022 edition, David Grevemberg, the chief executive of The Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF), told AFP. Durban lost the right to host the Games on Monday -- just 18 months after being awarded them -- when it failed to meet criteria laid down by the CGF, primarily over costs. "I wouldn't want to make a judgement call," Grevemberg told AFP on the sidelines of a briefing by 2018 Games hosts Gold Coast on Wednesday. "Durban has hosted some great events, it is a fantastic city and are wonderful warm hosts with bright ambitions and great aspirations. "However, it takes more than a municipality,...
(Reuters (Eng) 03/15/17)
Ethiopia has declared three days of national mourning for victims of a landslide at a rubbish landfill site in the capital Addis Ababa. Flags flew at half mast on Wednesday as the government announced that the death toll from the disaster that occurred at the 50-year-old Reppi dump on Saturday evening had risen to at least 72 people. On Tuesday, at least 17 bodies were pulled out from the site and buried at the nearby Abune Aregawi Church, attended by hundreds of grief-stricken family members. Emergency workers and police officers in Reppi told Reuters that the total number had risen to 82 by Tuesday evening.
(The Wall Street Journal 03/15/17)
Ndalo Media founder Khanyi Dhlomo and Mara Group founder Ashish Thakkar on where the potential is and what’s blocking it How is innovation in Africa different from innovation in Silicon Valley? And how can innovation in Africa be encouraged? Dan Keeler, frontier-markets editor of The Wall Street Journal, discussed those questions with Khanyi Dhlomo, founder and chief executive of Ndalo Media, a publisher based in South Africa, and Ashish Thakkar, founder of Mara Group, a pan-African investment group with operations in banking, real estate, infrastructure and technology. Edited excerpts follow. MR. KEELER: What about innovation in Africa? Khanyi, what sort of things are you seeing that are inspiring you? MS. DHLOMO:There’s a lot of innovation happening in Africa. But it’s...
(AFP (eng) 03/14/17)
The death toll from a landslide at Ethiopia's largest rubbish dump reached 72 on Tuesday as the country's parliament declared three days of national mourning, a government minister told AFP. "The death toll is 72 so far," Communications Minister Negeri Lencho said, adding that rescuers were still searching for survivors and victims' bodies. Part of the largest hill at the Koshe rubbish dump in the capital Addis Ababa gave way on Saturday, swallowing up a slum that had been built on the trash and burying families alive in their homes. Most of the dead are women and children.
(BBC News Africa 03/14/17)
Twenty-one rhino horns worth an estimated $5m have been seized in Thailand after being found in luggage sent from Ethiopia in the biggest such haul in years. The seizure comes days after 300kg of elephant ivory was also impounded in the country. Thailand is seen as a transit point for the illegal trafficking of wildlife. Several species of rhino are at critical risk of extinction, conservationists say. The horns arrived at Bangkok's international airport where two Thai women who had travelled from Vietnam and Cambodia came to collect them. According to Thai police, they ran off when the luggage was subjected to a random check. Officials describe the incident as an elaborate smuggling effort which involved several other people inside...
(BBC News Africa 03/14/17)
Twenty-one rhino horns worth an estimated $5m have been seized in Thailand after being found in luggage sent from Ethiopia in the biggest such haul in years. The seizure comes days after 300kg of elephant ivory was also impounded in the country. Thailand is seen as a transit point for the illegal trafficking of wildlife. Several species of rhino are at critical risk of extinction, conservationists say. The horns arrived at Bangkok's international airport where two Thai women who had travelled from Vietnam and Cambodia came to collect them. According to Thai police, they ran off when the luggage was subjected to a random check. Officials describe the incident as an elaborate smuggling effort which involved several other people inside...
(Reuters (Eng) 03/14/17)
Bereaved families tussled with rescue workers on Tuesday at the site of an Ethiopian rubbish dump where a landslide killed 65 people this weekend. Relatives pushed and shoved the handful of emergency workers, angrily accusing them of delays and saying dozens of people were still missing after Saturday's disaster at the Reppi dump in the capital of Addis Ababa. "Nobody is helping us. We are doing all the digging ourselves. It is shameful," Kaleab Tsegaye, a relative of one victim told Reuters. (Reporting by Aaron Masho; Editing by Katharine Houreld and Louise Ireland)
(Agence Ecofin 03/14/17)
The Land Policy Initiative (LPI), a joint programme of the tripartite consortium consisting of the African Union Commission (AUC), the African Development Bank (AfDB) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) has launched a pilot project to track progress in implementing in the AU Declaration on land issues in Africa. This was revealed by the ECA in a press statement dated March 7. In collaboration with the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), the project will assess progress made in implementing the key decisions and commitments of the AU Declaration on Land adopted in July 2009 by the General Assembly of the pan-African institution. “We are to a large extent in unchartered waters given many of our Member...
(AFP (eng) 03/13/17)
The Addis Ababa tramway is one of the few examples of urban public transport infrastructure in a continent where public transport system is severally constrained. But 14 months after it was inaugurated, the tramway is struggling to match user expectations. Problems with the design of the route, abnormally fast wear and tear resulting in breakdowns and delays has not unblocked the streets of the Ethiopian capital. And despite offering a slightly advantageous tariff on long journeys, the network of constantly overloaded private minibuses still remains the only option for majority of the inhabitants.
(Reuters (Eng) 03/13/17)
At least 48 people, 15 of them children, were killed in a landslide at a huge garbage dump on the outskirts of the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, the city's spokesman said on Monday. Hundreds of people live on the 50-year-old Reppi dump, the city's only landfill site, scavenging for food and items they can sell such as recyclable metal. Efforts are still under way to find people still missing since the landslide late on Saturday which destroyed 49 dwellings, city spokesman Amare Mekonen said. Twenty-eight people were being treated in hospital. "In a bid to prevent such things happening again, people who were living in this area have now been taken to youth centers in other parts of the city,"...
(Reuters (Eng) 03/13/17)
The United Arab Emirates, one of the Middle East's largest economies, wants to expand trade ties with faster growing nations in Asia and Africa, a senior official said on Sunday. Rich Gulf Arab states are looking at ways to diversify their economies, including who they trade with, after more than two years of depressed oil prices forced a rethink of government spending. The pace of economic growth in Asian and sub-Saharan African economies has made them ideal partners, Abdullah al-Saleh, undersecretary for foreign trade and industry at the UAE ministry of the economy, told Reuters in an interview in Dubai. Asia's two largest economies China and India are expected to grow by 6.5 percent and 7.2 percent this year whilst...
(Agence Ecofin 03/10/17)
Last Wednesday, the World Bank announced it would provide more than $1.6 billion to Ethiopia, Kenya, Nigeria, Somalia, Southern Sudan and Yemen to fight hunger. More than 20 million people are to benefit from the facility. “Our first priority is to work with partners to make sure that families have access to food and water. We are working towards a financial package of more than $1.6 billion to build social protection systems, strengthen economic reliance, and maintain service delivery to the most vulnerable,” said World Bank’s president, Jim Yong Kim. “This package includes over $870 million worth of existing projects which will help fight hunger. I am also working with the bank’s board of directors to secure the approval of...
(AFP (eng) 03/10/17)
In the beginning was .com, followed by a host of other .somethings, but on Friday, 32 years after the world's first domain name was registered, the African Union has launched .africa for the continent. Africans who want to register a website will be able to apply for a .africa domain name in the coming months, which outgoing AU commission chair Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma said would allow the continent's people and businesses to better reach the world. "With .africa, I would say Africa has finally got its digital identity," said Dlamini-Zuma, who will next week hand power to Chadian Foreign Minister Moussa Faki Mahamat after four years at the helm of the continental body Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the lowest rates...
(Voice of America 03/09/17)
U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Wednesday that East Africans are facing starvation and that the situation might worsen if nothing is done to avert the crisis. The United Nations estimates more than 17 million people are facing hunger in nine countries. Somalia is facing its second famine in less than six years, South Sudan has declared some parts of the country in famine, and Kenya's government declared the drought there a national disaster. More than 10 million people are going to bed hungry in Ethiopia alone. Guterres, ending a visit to Kenya on Wednesday, discussed the South Sudan political and humanitarian crisis with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta. "We had the opportunity to discuss, to find, identify [a] point of view...
(Xinhuanet 03/09/17)
A critical mass of trained and well equipped community health workforce is key to easing the rising burden of infectious and noncommunicable diseases in Africa, experts said on Wednesday at a continental forum taking place in Nairobi. The experts, policymakers and campaigners who attended Africa Health Agenda International Conference agreed that optimal engagement of community health workers is key to revolutionize response to diseases ravaging the continent. Kenya's Cabinet Secretary for Health Cleopa Mailu in his opening remarks said that investments in training for community health workers will have multiplier impact on Africa's socioeconomic development. "We require highly skilled and motivated cadre of community health workforce to deal with a high diseases burden in disadvantaged settings in this continent. These...
(Reuters (Eng) 03/08/17)
Millions of drought-stricken Ethiopians needing food, water and emergency medical care are not receiving it due to funding shortages, the United Nations said, warning the crisis will worsen if spring rains fail as predicted. Some 5.6 million people need food aid in the Horn of Africa nation, which has been hit by a series of back-to-back droughts. "The needs relating to the developing emergency exceed resources available to date," the U.N.'s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said on Monday. "Each day without food assistance exponentially increases human suffering, lengthens the recovery period of affected people, puts increasing pressure on humanitarian and development systems
(Malawi 24 03/08/17)
Malawi and Ethiopia held bilateral talks on Monday and Tuesday in order to strengthen the relationship between the countries and discuss issues that will help their economies. Among other issues, the two countries discussed long-term solutions to the problem of Ethiopian migrants who illegally enter Malawi when going to other countries. Malawi Kasaila: a bilateral relationship with Ethiopia is beneficial The two nations also discussed issues of infrastructure, diaspora remittances, trade and security. Speaking during the opening of the two day session of the Malawi-Ethiopia Joint Permanent Commission for Cooperation on Monday, minister of foreign affairs and international cooperation Francis Kasaila said a bilateral relationship with Ethiopia is beneficial as it will tackle a lot of areas helpful for both...

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