Sunday 25 June 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 06/23/17)
DAR ES SALAAM (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Sadick Thenest remembers how his 8-year-old daughter had a narrow brush with death two years ago, when she contracted cholera after drinking contaminated water. “She was so gaunt, weak and had terrible diarrhea,” said the refugee from Burundi. “A slight delay in rushing her to hospital would have meant something else - but with God’s grace she survived.” The father of four, aged 35, is among thousands of refugees grappling with frequent outbreaks of waterborne diseases in the crowded Nyarugusu camp in western Tanzania, due to poor sanitation. “Living in a refugee camp is a constant struggle. You either stick to health rules or contract diseases,” he told...
(AFP (eng) 06/22/17)
The Somali people of Ethiopia's southeast have a name for the drought that has killed livestock, dried up wells and forced hundreds of thousands into camps: sima, which means "equalised". It's an appropriate name, they say, because this drought has left no person untouched, spared no corner of their arid region. And it has forced 7.8 million people across the whole of Ethiopia to rely on emergency food handouts to stay alive. But by next month, that food will have run out, aid agencies say. Droughts are common in Ethiopia, and in past years the government and international community have mounted impressive efforts to curb starvation. This year though, Africa's second most-populous country is struggling to find the money for...
(Voice of America 06/21/17)
WASHINGTON DC — On June 5, Saudi Arabia and its allies, including Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, cut diplomatic ties with Qatar, accusing it of funding extremist groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood and Islamic State. In response, Qatar said it was the victim of a policy of “domination and control” by its larger neighbor and that Saudi Arabia was, in fact, the one responsible for backing extremism. So what is the truth? Fundamentalist strains of Islam, including...
(AFP (eng) 06/14/17)
Extortion, corruption and fear; violence, hunger and sometimes even death: for west African migrants dreaming of reaching Europe, the road to get there can be an absolute minefield. - Departure - Whether it's The Gambia, Ivory Coast, Senegal or Nigeria, everything starts with the "hustlers" -- slang for the middlemen or fixers who organise the trip. Their honesty and prices vary, with the would-be migrant usually deceived about the welcome expected in Europe. Many possess no official documents from their home country, and do not understand illegal status in Europe. Most are ignorant about the extreme difficulties they will encounter en route. "We didn't know we were risking our lives," said Kante Sekou...
(AFP (eng) 06/14/17)
Maria gave smugglers all her family savings and crossed three countries and the searing Libyan desert, but when she finally boarded a boat for Europe her dream was swiftly shattered. She was 24 and pregnant with her second child when she left Liberia with her husband and their three-year-old son. The family passed through Guinea and Mali before crossing southern Algeria to reach the Libyan desert. "The smugglers took all our money" -- more than $2,150 (2,000 euros), she said...
(AFP (eng) 06/13/17)
Uche's real journey had yet to begin but he had already spent four days in the northern Nigerian city of Kano after travelling on public buses and potholed roads from Imo state in the southeast. He planned to go to Agadez, a transit town on the southern edge of the Sahara desert in central Niger, take a truck to Sebha, in southwestern Libya, and from there to the capital Tripoli, and then to Italy or Spain. But his contact, who...
(AFP (eng) 06/09/17)
Ethiopia re-activated cellphone data services and unexpectedly allowed access to social media sites that had been blocked since a wave of anti-government protests last year, a government spokesman told AFP on Thursday. Africa's second most-populous country shut down internet access even to diplomatic installations last week in a move the government said was necessary to keep students from being distracted during annual exams. Deputy communications minister Zadig Abraha confirmed the lifting of the ban but declined to say why social...
(AfricaNews 06/08/17)
Ethiopian authorities have restored internet access across the country a little over a week after imposed a blackout, the BBC reports. According to the authorities, the blockage was to preserve the integrity of nationwide examinations that were slated between May 31 and June 8. The Grade 10 and 12 exams are for university entrance purposes and also for enrollment into national vocational courses. Thousands of students took the Grade 10 exams between May 31 until June 2 whiles others took...
(AFP (eng) 06/08/17)
At their campus in the farmland west of Ethiopia's capital, the students of Ambo University attend lectures, play football and worry about which of their classmates is spying on them. It wasn't long ago that Ambo and other towns in Ethiopia's Oromia region were wracked by anti-government protests so fierce parliament declared a state of emergency last October. The decree stopped the unrest -- and while fear of arrest or death at the hands of security forces has kept protesters...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/08/17)
More girls are completing secondary school across sub-Saharan Africa as attitudes change and state spending rises, but some of the most marginalized girls — like those married young or forced to work — are still missing out, education experts say. The percentage of girls completing secondary school has risen in all regions of Africa since 2005, said a recent report by the African Development Bank, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the U.N. Development Program. Almost twice as...
(AFP (eng) 06/07/17)
Ethiopians were still unable to surf the web via mobile networks on Tuesday, despite government claims the nationwide internet shutdown, which began a week ago, had been lifted. Africa's second most-populous country turned off its internet access without warning or explanation last week, briefly depriving even diplomatic buildings, like the UN's Economic Commission for Africa and the headquarters of the African Union, of internet access. While service to those two institutions was restored and subscribers to broadband internet say they...
(Xinhuanet 06/07/17)
7.8 million people in Ethiopia need food assistance due to a prolonged drought worsened by the El-Nino weather condition, said a government minister on Wednesday. Ethiopian communications minister Negeri Lencho said in a statement that the government has set aside 50 million U.S. dollars for drought relief. In the beginning of the year, the Ethiopian government had put the number of people in need of food aid in the country at 5.6 million but later revised it to 7.2 million...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/07/17)
Building a network of African women leaders in fields ranging from business to politics could galvanize female leadership across the continent and boost peacebuilding efforts and good governance, the head of U.N. Women said on Tuesday. The African Women Leaders Network, which was launched last week in New York by the United Nations and the African Union Commission, hopes to drive more women into leadership roles, through mentoring, peer learning and harnessing contacts. By supporting women's leadership in Africa, the...
(Addis Fortune 06/06/17)
I was just here for a working visit in Ethiopia when I heard that the government has shutdown the Internet. Whooooaaah!!! Can they do that? I asked my friends who are hosting me. Their answer was clear and simple. The government can do anything and does not even have to explain why it is doing that!!! As Ethiopia strives towards middle-income status, advanced by foreign direct investment as well as increasing trade and business opportunities, the shutting down of Internet...
(Voice of America 06/03/17)
Forecasters are warning that Ethiopia could face more rainfall deficits, deepening a drought that has left nearly eight million of the country's people in need of aid. Dr. Chris Funk is a climate scientist at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) whose research focuses on African and Asian countries. He told VOA's Horn of Africa Service that there is a 50 percent chance another El Nino weather event could form in the Pacific Ocean this year. “If it's a moderate or strong El Nino, that would definitely tilt towards odd, below normal rain for northern Ethiopia," he said.
(Xinhuanet 06/02/17)
Fifty-four African Union member states will convene the 5th Continental Conference of Solidarity with Cuba in the Namibian capital from June 5-7, said an Naminian official on Thursday. The Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of International relations and Cooperation, Selma Ashipala-Musavyi, said the aim of hosting the conference in Namibia is to intensify solidarity and to strengthen bounds of friendship between the people of Cuba and the progressive peoples throughout the African Continent. Namibia's President Hage Geingob will open and...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/01/17)
Ethiopia has cut off internet access nationwide until at least June 8 to try to stop cheats from posting high school exam papers on social media, a government official said on Thursday. Hundreds of thousands of students will take the tests throughout the Horn of Africa country with Grade 10 exams taking place from May 31 until June 2, and Grade 12 tests from June 5 until June 8. Last year, exam papers were widely posted online, prompting the government...
(AfricaNews 06/01/17)
January 2017 was a year since I arrived in Congo Pointe Noire to assume responsibility as a web journalist with Africanews. Leaving Accra – where I had spent all my life – for a new environment felt strange but I yearned for the challenge ahead. Even though I arrived on an Air Ivoire flight that took me through Abidjan to Pointe Noire, I opted for Ethiopian Airlines for my journey to and from Accra for during my vacation in March...
(AFP (eng) 06/01/17)
One in five children born with a twin sibling in sub-Saharan Africa dies before the age of five -- three times the rate among singletons, said a study Thursday. Almost two-thirds die in the first month of life -- often succumbing to the after-effects of a difficult birth or entering the world too early or underweight, according to research published in The Lancet medical journal. And while rates of under-five deaths in the sub-Saharan African region have declined over two...
(AFP (eng) 05/31/17)
Ethiopia said Wednesday it had deactivated mobile internet service, but offered no explanation for the countrywide outage that also briefly affected the African Union headquarters and a massive UN facility. This is the second time in recent months that Africa's second most populous country has turned off its mobile data service, which most businesses and consumers rely on for internet access. The country's single telecommunications provider disabled its data service for weeks last year amid fierce anti-government protests which have since been curbed under a state of emergency in place since last October. "Mobile data has been deactivated," deputy communications minister Zadig

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