Monday 23 October 2017

Guinée

(The Citizen 12/22/15)
Beijing — China is determined to cement its presence in Africa as it seeks to pursue a more aggressive and dynamic partnership with the continent, a senior official at the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs said here on Tuesday. The new partnership, clearly articulated during the recently concluded Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (Focac) in Johannesburg on December 5, is part of the global industrial powerhouse's efforts to spread and consolidate its international influence. The partnership, that will be defined through new political, diplomatic, economic and cultural policies, will be implemented between 2016 and 2018 and will be reviewed at the next Focac meeting in Beijing in 2018. The director general of the Africa Department in the Chinese Foreign Affairs ministry,...
(The Citizen 12/22/15)
The 10th Ministereal Conference of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) will be held in Nairobi from 15th to 18th December 2015. The event is expected to be attended by trade negotiators of the 161 WTO Members States including Dr.Ekwow Spio Garbrah, the Honourable Minister for Trade and Industry , and even delegates from non-member countries. Development practitioners from around the world, those for long live WTO and those with death to WTO placards will be flocking to Nairobi, though rumour has it that the latter will be fenced off at a nearby park. WTO is a multilateral trading system firmly rooted in non-discrimination principle, that is, if a country for instance decides to make tariff concessions to its favourite country,...
(Dw-World 12/22/15)
Joseph Blatter has pledged to fight the eight-year ban handed down to him by FIFA's Ethics Committee with all means at his disposal. He also reiterated earlier assertions that he had done nothing wrong. The FIFA president told reporters at a press conference in Zurich on Monday that he would go to the Lausanne-based Court of Arbitration for Sport and to a Swiss human rights court in a bid to get his ban on all football-related activities overturned. "I will fight, for me, for FIFA," said Blatter. "Banned eight years, for what?" The statement came just minutes after the Ethics Committee of football's world governing body handed down the eight year bans on both him and UEFA President Michel Platini...
(AFP (eng) 12/21/15)
Guinea's government said on Monday it would step aside in the next two days to make way for a new administration as President Alpha Conde was installed for a second term. The 77-year-old, re-elected in controversial October polls, was handed a sealed list of his functions during a 15-minute ceremony at the constitutional court. "From this moment, the president begins his second term of five years and, in the process, logically the government will resign today or tomorrow at the latest," Justice Minister Cheick Sako said in a statement. Conde had already been sworn in at a more elaborate ceremony a week earlier, but was asked to re-read his oath as he had omitted the pledge to "uphold the law"...
(APA 12/21/15)
The inauguration ceremony of Guinean President Alpha Condé took place as scheduled on Monday at Sekhou Tourah palace, APA reports in the Guinean capital, Conakry. During the event, President Condé was invited by the president of the High Court to repeat the oath taken during the first round of his inauguration on December 14. It should be recalled that an omission of part of this oath during his first term had aroused controversy across the country prompting some legal experts to suggest he makes up for the mistake during Monday’s installation ceremony. After reading the oath, the Court gave the re-elected head of state the attributes of the nation including “dry and wet seals and the two boxes containing the...
(Voice of America 12/21/15)
The United States is expected to add two species of lions in Africa to its endangered list Monday in a move that will make it more difficult for hunters to bring lion trophies back into the country. The Fish and Wildlife Service, which manages the list, is linking the move to declining populations in the wild and the need to ensure those who illegally hunt cannot gain from their actions. One lion species found in central and western parts of Africa, as well as India, has a population estimated around 1,000 and is being classified as endangered. The other species, predominant in eastern and southern Africa, has a population up to 19,000 and will be classified as threatened. The labels...
(Daily Nation 12/21/15)
As the world's attention focuses on the 10th Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), Africa should be clear on its agenda and what it expects from the assembly. A lot has been said about Africa hosting this conference at a time when the voice of least developed and emerging economies has been louder than ever before in the Doha Rounds and has charted the course for these negotiations. The director-general of the World Trade Organisation, Mr Roberto Azevêdo, has pointed out that export promotion remains at the top of the African agenda of deliverables in Nairobi. Yet the question must be asked whether export promotion, important as it may seem, is Africa's priority at this point in time...
(The East African 12/19/15)
The United States and the European Union are pushing to have multinationals exempted from local laws in developing countries. If adopted, the proposed trading rules will mean that multinationals such as Google, Facebook and financial institutions with roots in US and EU will operate locally without submitting to local regulation. They will not be required to give local companies preference in procurement nor will their subsidiaries be required to have local participation in their ownership.
(Ips News 12/19/15)
Texcoco — Every day in the wee hours of the morning Verónica Reyes' extended family grinds corn to make the dough they use in the tacos they sell from their food truck in Mexico City. Sons, daughters-in-law and nephews and nieces divide the work in the family business that makes and sells cecina (dried, salted meat) tacos, longaniza (a kind of Spanish sausage), quesadillas and tlacoyos (thick stuffed oval-shaped corn dough tortillas). "We cook the corn the night before and we grind it early in the morning, to serve people at 8:00 AM," said Reyes, who has made a living selling food for years. The family loads up the metal countertop, gas cylinders, tables, chairs, ingredients and over 60 kg...
(BBC News Africa 12/19/15)
Could putting vibrations into the ground be a way to keep elephants from coming into conflict with humans? Already, attempts have been made to scare the animals away from villages using their own very low-frequency alarm calls - with partial success. Now scientists are studying whether even better results could be obtained if this sound in the air is accompanied also by a seismic signal underfoot. The work is being led by Prof Sue Webb from Wits University in Johannesburg. The ultimate goal she said was to try to find a means of keeping everyone safe - both humans and elephants. "Elephants can be incredibly destructive, especially with people's farmlands," she told BBC News. "They come on to the farmland...
(AFP (eng) 12/18/15)
West African leaders said on Thursday they were seeking to "forbid" women wearing full-face veils in an effort to battle the growing number of female suicide bombers. The president of the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) Commission, Kadre Desire Ouedraogo, told reporters at the close of a two-day summit in Abuja that leaders must take "measures that would forbid this kind of dress that will not allow security personnel to be sure of their identities."
(APA 12/18/15)
The 48 Ordinary Session of the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) Heads of State and Government which ended at the Ecowas headquarters in Abuja, Nigeria, on Thursday, recommended, among other things, the banning of the wearing of the full veil Islamic dress, the ‘Burqa’. The recommendation is made as part of the region’s security reinforcement as well as an effort to curb the growing number of female suicide bombers unleashed by the Boko Haram jihadists, mainly in Nigeria and other parts of the sub-region. The summit recommended the regional leaders to take "measures that would forbid this kind of dress that will not allow security personnel to be sure of their identities." "Certain dress codes, which make identification...
(The Citizen 12/18/15)
A four-day World Trade Organisation (WTO) meeting started in Nairobi on Tuesday and it is specially significant for such a conference is being held in Africa for the first time. It is held two years after ministers from the World Trade Organisation member countries reached an agreement in Bali to overhaul global customs procedures. The idea was to boost agricultural export competition and trade development in developing nations and be able to create a win-win situation among member countries. However, nothing has been implemented since the last meeting, and chances are that even a partial trade deal won't be reached this time around. What appears to be a hindrance is that, the US, Europe and Japan are undermining global food...
(Xinhuanet 12/18/15)
(Xinhua) -- African countries have insisted only an agriculture deal that favours the developing countries in Africa would make-or-break the trade impasse that has lasted for close to 15 years. "We must allow the intensive negotiations that are underway," said Karanja Kibicho, Kenya Principal Secretary for foreign affairs at the ongoing four-day World Trade Organisation (WTO) Ministerial Conference. "It is agriculture that will deliver a Nairobi Ministerial Declaration." Kenya's position resonates with a declaration by the Cotton Four, four West African countries leading the negotiations on the removal of cotton subsidies on behalf of 34 other African cotton producers. The ministers from Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali, agreed in Nairobi on Wednesday, to declare a trade dispute if a...
(The New Times 12/17/15)
Least developed, low developed or developing countries, which is which? The choice of diction here is the privilege of the report authors, the subjects usually have no pick; the same can possibly be said of the United Nations 2015 "Least Developed Countries" (LDCs) report launched at a quiet event in Kigali last week. Authored by the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the report tracks the so-called 'least developed countries' and its updated list has 48 countries; in the wider eastern Africa region, all but Kenya, made the list, a not quite prestigious list. These include Tanzania, Uganda, DR Congo, South Sudan, Burundi and Rwanda. The Minister for Finance and Economic Planning, Claver Gatete, said it is more accurate...
(Business Day Ghana 12/16/15)
African countries lose $148 billion to corruption every year, President of the African Development Bank, Akinwumi Adesina has said. "Just think of how many continents you could light up with that amount," Adesina said at the Bank's headquarters in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire on December 9, 2015 in commemoration of International Anti-Corruption Day under the theme Break the Corruption Chain. According to him, $55 billion a year is enough to light up and power Africa - an amount, he said could be realised given the continent's $82 trillion in undiscovered resources, adding that darkness has festered on the continent due to corruption. "The cost of corruption is massive; it turns the whole continent into darkness. Because of corruption, Africa is known...
(Voice of America 12/16/15)
Africa cannot be left to foot the bill for climate change, so say leaders and specialists from the continent who attended the recent climate conference in Paris. Nearly 200 nations adopted a historic deal December 12 that aims to slow the pace of global warming and provide billions of dollars for climate change remediation to poorer countries. While it's hard to predict the impact the deal will have on Africa, it's significant that there is recognition of the continent's vulnerability, says Edith Ofwana-Adera, a senior program specialist on climate change for the International Development Research Center (IDRC), who attended the summit. "Agriculture is the backbone of many African economies,” she said. “So what's foremost in the minds of African stakeholders...
(Voice of America 12/16/15)
GENEVA— A senior U.N. official warns that increasingly children are being killed, maimed, and recruited as soldiers and suicide bombers in armed conflict. Leila Zerrougui was appointed the U.N. Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict in 2012. She says the plight of children has worsened every year under her watch. 2015 is shaping up to be the worst year of all. The United Nations is tracking the status of children in 20 conflicts in the Middle East, Africa, Asia and one in Latin America. Zerrougui notes six ongoing major crises are putting the lives and futures of children at particular risk. She says tens of thousands of children are being killed and maimed, recruited as child...
(Xinhuanet 12/15/15)
(Xinhua) -- South African Trade Minister Rob Davies said Monday that African countries were being ripped off their fair share of the proceeds from trade in raw agricultural commodities such as coffee due to its lack of representation at the world market. Citing recent reports showing the worldwide coffee marketing value chain was worth 100 billion U.S. dollars while African coffee exporters earned a paltry 6 billion dollars, Davies said Africa will benefit from its share of the world trade only if it was facilitated to participate internationally. Speaking at the 4th China Roundtable ahead of the WTO Ministerial Conference in Nairobi, Davies said the lack of industries in Africa was to blame for the continent's poor share of the...
(AL Jazeera 12/15/15)
Many African entrepreneurs today consider China as the new land of opportunities. One of them is Annie Ngimbi from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). With demand for Chinese products growing, Ngimbi is on a shopping spree in China's third largest city, Guangzhou. She has three weeks to fill a container with a list of products to sell back home in the DRC. She buys everything from clothes, furniture and electronics to food items such as onions and garlic. A dynamic woman, Ngimbi is no pushover when it comes to business. Working with an established network of African and Chinese middlemen and traders, she haggles with some of the toughest businessmen in the world. Through her journey, we see how...

Pages

(Voice of America 03/16/15)
At least 10 U.S. aid workers who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone are being evacuated to the United States. U.S. officials said Saturday that the individuals would be housed near the University of Nebraska Medical Center, the National Institutes of Health in Maryland, or Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. All three have been used to treat American Ebola patients in the past. On Friday, a U.S. health care worker who tested positive for Ebola while in Sierra Leone arrived at the NIH for treatment.
(The Guardian 03/16/15)
The workshop will specifically focus on an independent inquiry into these emerging actors’ footprint in Africa by African media sources, distinct from the views and opinions of the West, which have always largely influenced the outlook and perceptions of key players in the business climate. Convener of the workshop, the Fahamu’s Emerging Powers in Africa, said it seeks to strengthen the voice of African media in investigating and reporting the impact of such emerging actors like China, India, Brazil, South Korea and Turkey, among others, on Africa’s external engagements and development landscape. One area of key interest, it noted, is the need to examine how these emerging powers define their roles and stakes in aid, bilateral trade, investment and diplomatic...
(Voice of America 03/14/15)
MONROVIA/CONAKRY— This week's report that the death toll from West Africa's Ebola epidemic has topped 10,000 is a reminder that many challenges remain to bring the number of cases down to zero, health experts say. The three most-affected Ebola countries — Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — appeared in early January to be making progress against the disease.
(Ipp media 03/14/15)
The African Court of Human and Peoples’ Rights (AfCHPR) has embarked on a programme geared to produce multilingual promotional materials for the court proceedings so that it can be clearly understood by ordinary people. Despite the fact that Swahili is among the African Union’s official languages, it can be given due consideration in the new court programme. Other AU official languages include English, French, Portuguese and Arabic.
(The Citizen 03/14/15)
Arusha. The African Court on Human and People’s Rights (AfCHPR) has reiterated its concern on failure by African states to allow individuals and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to file applications before the court. “Human rights pertain to individuals and not governments. If individuals cannot access the court, then something has gone wrong,” lamented AfCHPR President Judge Augustino Ramadhani here on Thursday. He said the court, which started operations about a decade ago, would fail its mandate if it does not serve individuals against various forms of human rights violations. Until now, only seven of the 28 African Union member states which have ratified the protocol that established AfCHPR have allowed individuals and NGOs to file cases before it. Justice Ramadhani was...
(Voice of America 03/13/15)
When the Ebola outbreak finally ends in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, those countries could continue to face serious health problems. Researchers say Ebola has disrupted health care systems, causing a “significant decrease” in vaccinations for measles and other childhood diseases. Dr. Justin Lessler said health care systems took a beating during the Ebola crisis with about 75 percent of services being disrupted. “The health care systems there were somewhat weak to begin with. And during the Ebola crisis many health care centers closed and there’s evidence that less people were coming to the facilities that were open
(Xinhuanet 03/13/15)
ADDIS ABABA, March (Xinhua) -- The International Road Federation (IRF) has called for concerted efforts to reduce road traffic fatalities in Africa, which remain high on the continent, and also to achieve the UN goal of reducing road traffic fatalities by 50 percent by 2020. As the present situation on road safety is challenging in Africa, Kiran Kapila, IRF Chair, has underlined the need to work with concerted efforts and in partnership to improve the scenario. The Chairman was speaking on Wednesday at the opening of an International Conference organized to deliberate on road safety challenge for Africa, here in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa. Kapila told reporters, particularly that road safety is challenging in Africa due to poor road infrastructure...
(Ips News 03/13/15)
Harare — African wetlands are among the most biologically diverse ecosystems on the continent, covering more than 131 million hectares, according to the Senegalese-based Wetlands International Africa (WIA). Yet, despite their importance and value, wetland areas are experiencing immense pressure across the continent. Commercial development ranks as the major threat for the draining of wetlands, including for tourism facilities and agriculture, where hundreds of thousands of hectares of wetlands have been drained. Other threats to Africa's wetlands are commercial agriculture, settlements, excessive exploitation by local communities and improperly-planned development activities. The prospect of immense profits from recently discovered oil, coal and gas deposits has also led to an increase in on-and offshore exploration and mining in sensitive ecological areas. Commercial...
(Xinhuanet 03/12/15)
FREETOWN, March (Xinhua) -- A senior Sierra Leonean health official has commended China's "unprecedented" anti-Ebola efforts in Africa, saying no strings attached to China's assistance. Dr. Brima Kargbo, the Chief Medical Officer of the country's Ministry of Health, lauded the "humanitarian and unprecedented assistance" from China to Sierra Leone since the outbreak of the Ebola virus disease that has claimed nearly 10,000 lives. Kargbo said the medical experts and the materials from China have contributed "immensely in reversing the disastrous effect of the Ebola scourge". China has carried out its largest overseas aid program in the health area since the Ebola outbreak, providing several rounds of humanitarian aid with a combined value of more than 120 million U. S. dollars...
(Xinhuanet 03/12/15)
NAIROBI, March 12 (Xinhua) -- Sub-Saharan African countries have forged strong ties with China in order to acquire technologies and expertise that are crucial to accelerate an agrarian revolution, an African expert has said. Emmanuel Tambi, director of policy and advocacy with the Forum for Agriculture Research in Africa, noted that Sino-Africa cooperation in agriculture has unleashed mutual benefits. "There are a number of ongoing initiatives between China and Africa to strengthen cooperation in the field of agriculture. China is discussing trade in agriculture products with regional blocs," Tambi told Xinhua in an interview in Nairobi. He said the Asian nation's technical support has improved agriculture productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa. China, through the FAO, has dispatched 235 experts to Mongolia,...
(The Herald Online 03/12/15)
African economies can fully derive maximum value from their resources if they embrace the use of information technology, Chief Secretary to the President and Cabinet Dr Misheck Sibanda has said. Speaking during the launch of Twenty Third Century Systems' Africa Graduate Trainee Programme in Harare yesterday, Dr Sibanda said the world was in the era of "knowledge economy" that is characterised by the pervasive influence of ICTs.
(Dw-World 03/12/15)
Is the 'Islamic State', feared for atrocities and the destruction of priceless artifacts, about to expand its operations to sub-Saharan Africa? Claus Stäcker sees a meeting of terrorist minds but no overarching plan. It was a recorded audio message; the content highly volatile. The leader of Boko Haram, Abubakar Shekau has apparently pledged allegiance to self-styled Caliph Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The message evokes a terrifying vision of an Islamist terror network stretching from Iraq and Syria to Libya and West Africa, the prospect of the ever faster globalization of terror and of a wide-ranging alliance of terrorists who butcher and murder their victims. Yet we should be wary of rushing to conclusions. There are doubts about the authenticity of the...
(Voice of America 03/11/15)
LONDON— The World Health Organization (WHO), criticized as being slow and poorly coordinated in its response to West Africa's Ebola outbreak, has commissioned an independent expert panel to asses its handling of the deadly epidemic. The Geneva-based United Nations health agency was sharply criticized for failing to heed repeated warnings by the medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres in the early days of the epidemic, which quickly grew to become the largest in history.
(The Wall Street Journal 03/11/15)
The latest progress report on African aviation safety features surprisingly good and bad news: jetliner losses dropped precipitously in 2014, but the rate of major turboprop crashes exceeded every other region. Globally, commercial jet safety in 2014 was the best ever, according to data released this week by the leading airline trade group. There was one serious jetliner accident for every 4.4 million flights last year, which the International Air Transport Association said was a historic low—and significantly improved from the industrywide average of one accident per 2.4 million flights spanning the previous few years. IATA’s results include 12 fatal accidents world-wide for all aircraft types, versus an average of 19 between 2019 and 2013. The downing in July of...
(The Associated Press 03/10/15)
The World Health Organization says it has created a panel of independent experts to assess its response to the biggest-ever Ebola outbreak in history. In a statement Tuesday, the U.N. health agency said the panel was commissioned after a resolution passed by its executive board. The panel will be chaired by Barbara Stocking, a former chief executive of Oxfam GB. A preliminary report is due in May. WHO's handling of the Ebola outbreak that has killed over 9,900 people in West Africa has been heavily criticized. WHO admitted in an internal draft report that it fumbled early attempts to curb the outbreak, blaming incompetent staff and a lack of real-time information. Others also criticized WHO for not declaring an international...
(Voice of America 03/09/15)
The World Health Organization began large-scale testing of an experimental Ebola vaccine in Guinea on Saturday. Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, WHO assistant director-general, told The Associated Press that the agency intended to "vaccinate for this trial up to 10,000 people, maybe more." "But also the manufacturers are producing much more vaccine right now, so that if the vaccine is proven to be efficacious, there could be millions of doses available later in the year," she said.
(Voice of America 03/09/15)
World Wildlife Day is celebrated annually on March 3. While it is a day to celebrate wildlife, this year international organizations and governments are calling attention to the devastating affects poaching has had on the world’s animal species. The theme is “It’s time to get serious about wildlife crime.” The African Wildlife Foundation has released a downloadable infographic which reveals the scale of what it says is a multi-billion dollar illegal wildlife trade and its impact on many of Africa’s species.
(Voice of America 03/07/15)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA— As the Ebola epidemic fades in intensity, medical concerns are shifting to the ongoing treatment of survivors. Many report persistent problems, from impaired vision to depression and fatigue to chronic pain. Psychological trauma, too, has "left people feeling low in energy, feeling some sadness, frustrated by some of the community response," said Dr. John Frankhauser, deputy medical director of a Liberian clinic specializing in free care for Ebola survivors. The clinic is at ELWA Hospital in Paynesville, on the outskirts of Monrovia.
(The Wall Street Journal 03/07/15)
Standard Bank Group Ltd., Africa’s biggest lender by assets, recorded a 12% rise in net profit in 2014 as it continued to dispose of business outside the continent. The Johannesburg-based bank said net profit rose to 15.93 billion South African rand ($1.35 billion) from 14.26 billion rand in 2013, on a 1% rise in group headline earnings to 17.32 billion rand in the year ended Dec. 31. Noninterest revenue climbed 14% from 2013 to 39 billion rand. Shares in the bank were up 5.0% at 156.35 rand in early afternoon trading. Last month, the lender completed the sale of 60% of its London-based business to the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Ltd. , a key bloc of its strategy...
(Vanguard 03/06/15)
The Chicago Council on Global Affairs during the week released recommendations on how U.S. trade policy could advance food security in Africa and position American businesses to tap a burgeoning African agriculture and food market, which is expected to reach $1 trillion by 2030. The report, Grow Markets, Fight Hunger: A Food Security Framework for U.S.-Africa Trade Relations, presents evidence that an effort by the United States focused on bolstering regional trade and harmonizing food standards and regulations across countries would drive economic growth while improving the availability and affordability of nutritious foods throughout Africa.

Pages

(Reuters (Eng) 08/21/13)
SYDNEY | Wed Aug 21, 2013 (Reuters) - Australian mining mogul Clive Palmer says his oil and gas business has identified what could be one of the world's largest gas fields off the coast of Papua New Guinea, potentially worth $35 billion. After $50 million worth of exploration over 3,000 square km, the northern region of the Gulf of Papua was found to have about 28 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas. "The results of the studies are extremely favorable and show this new Papua New Guinea gas region could possibly be as significant a resource area as the North West Shelf in Western Australia," said Palmer in a statement. The region, 12 km (7 miles) from the coastline, is...
(Times of swaziland 08/14/13)
MBABANE – As talks regarding the extension of AGOA post 2015 kicked off on Monday in Ethiopia’s Capital City Addis Ababa, Swaziland and other 49 African countries will be very lucky to see the legislation extended with the same existing terms and conditions, International Business Times has reported. Swaziland is one of the 49 AGOA beneficiaries. AGOA stands for Africa Growth Opportunity Act. AGOA was signed into law in 2000; it offers incentives mostly in the form of duty-free trade access to 49 eligible sub-Saharan economies to liberalise their markets and build connections with American trade partners. The agreement expires in 2015, and US and African officials would be setting fresh terms for its renewal. According to International Business Times,...
(Reuters 08/14/13)
LONDON | Wed Aug 14, 2013 (Reuters) - Iron ore mining group African Minerals (AMIq.L) surprised the market on Wednesday with the abrupt departure of both chief executive and chief financial officer and said it was scrapping expansion plans to focus on existing operations. Its shares fell almost 15 percent despite what some analysts said could prove a positive as the company concentrates on its Sierra Leone mine, Tonkolili. "From the onset it was clear that (Chief Executive Keith)Calder's broader ambition was to grow African Minerals into a diversified miner across West Africa in the near term," Jefferies analysts said in a note. "Perhaps our greatest concern for African Minerals in recent months was that the company would move too...
(Bloomberg 08/13/13)
China has begun looking at funding a railway and port that would service Rio Tinto Group’s Simandou iron project in Guinea and cost more than $10 billion, said four people with direct knowledge of the matter. The agency overseeing companies owned by China’s central government has gauged interest from state rail and port builders and also contacted China Development Bank Corp. about providing financing, said the people, who asked not to be identified as they weren’t authorized to speak publicly about the matter. Guinea’s inability to fund the rail line from its coast to Simandou, described by Rio as the world’s largest untapped deposit of iron ore, has “effectively frozen” the project, former mines minister Mahmoud Thiam said in April...
(Voice of America 08/13/13)
NAIROBI — The United States is keeping a close watch on potential European trade deals with African nations as Washington reviews its own preferential trade initiative with the continent. African ministers and U.S. officials discussed trade relations at a forum Monday in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa. The U.S. is considering an extension to the popular African Growth and Opportunity Act, known as AGOA, an American law that allows sub-Saharan African countries to export certain products to the United States duty free. First signed into law in 2000, the act has already been renewed once, and is set to expire in 2015. U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman has been meeting with African ministers at an AGOA forum in Addis Ababa...
(Reuters 08/09/13)
LONDON | Fri Aug 9, 2013 (Reuters) - Goldman Sachs (GS.N) has appointed Alasdair Warren as head of its financial sponsors group for Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), according to a memo seen by Reuters. Financial sponsors, the term investment banks use to describe private equity firms, are regular users of equity capital markets for selling shares in their portfolio companies. London-based Warren, who joined Goldman in 2005 and was named a partner in 2008, was previously head of equity capital markets (ECM), convertibles and equity derivatives for EMEA. Richard Cormack and Christoph Stanger will jointly take on that role, becoming co-heads of ECM and convertibles in EMEA, the memo said. A spokeswoman for Goldman Sachs confirmed the contents...
( FOROYAA Newspaper 08/07/13)
With its abundance of natural resources and large and growing population , Africa is the next frontier for many global companies. However, while investors are keen to get, there's often a wariness on the part of Africans. The BBC's Vineet Khare travelled to Ethiopia to find out about what can be a tricky relationship and how things are not always so rosy. Watch the video...
(Business Daily 08/06/13)
The top-ranking US trade official Michael Froman said on Monday that issues of "reciprocity" will be raised at a US-Africa conference next week in Ethiopia that will consider renewal of the Agoa trade initiative. The African Growth and Opportunity Act, which is due to expire in 2015, gives duty-free treatment to Kenyan textiles and many other African exports to the United States. Agoa is said to be responsible for creating thousands of jobs in the Kenyan textile industry. But as a condition to Agoa's extension beyond 2015, American negotiators may press African countries to give the same preferential treatment to US exports to Africa. Ambassador Froman made clear in a talk at the Brookings Institution in Washington that the US...
(Reuters 08/06/13)
LAGOS/SYDNEY, Aug 6 (Reuters) - Nigeria is gradually opening up to Islamic finance, a move that could bring non-interest banking to over 80 million Muslims and develop one of Africa's fastest-growing consumer and corporate banking sectors. Home to the largest Muslim population in sub-Saharan Africa, Nigeria is trying to establish itself as the African hub for Islamic finance, which follows religious principles such as bans on interest and gambling. In recent months, a string of regulatory initiatives have set the groundwork for products such as Islamic bonds (sukuk), insurance (takaful) and interbank lending products, although there is still only a small number of local market participants. "The potential is there but the market is negligible in Nigeria because we have...
(African arguments 08/02/13)
UK Minister for Africa, Mark Simmonds, has stated that the government will not intervene directly in Barclays Bank's decision to withdraw banking services to Money Service Businesses (MSBs) including those that provide remittance services to Somalia, but said he hoped that a 'market-based solution' could be found. Simmonds stated in a letter dated 18th July to SOAS academic Laura Hammond (and shared with African Arguments) that "the government would not be able to intervene on behalf of a particular company or 'remittance corridor'". He was responding to a letter submitted by Hammond on behalf of 105 academics, researchers and practitioners calling on the UK government to intervene to prevent the collapse of remittance flows into poor and fragile states, particularly...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/02/13)
LONDON | Fri Aug 2, 2013 (Reuters) - The winning investment strategy of 2013 has been simple but extreme: return home to the safety of the biggest, most-traded markets, or venture to the riskiest frontiers from Ivory Coast to Pakistan. Those in the middle of the risk curve - the biggest emerging markets that now account for almost half of the top 20 world economies - have been the big losers. The contrasting fortunes may herald the start of a broader repricing of big emerging economies where a flood of cheap money from developed economies has distorted prices the most. Risk - which dominated global financial markets in the past few years - has played a smaller role in defining...
(This Day Live 08/02/13)
Against the backdrop of the three-day investment roundtable in Cape Town, South Africa, John Iwori, who attended the event, writes that African countries are forging a common front in the shipping and energy sectors of the continent's economy. Working against One Another That most African countries are working at cross purposes is an understatement. In spite of their proximity, they prefer to work against their common interests. They hardly see each other as partners in progress. In fact, they see themselves as enemies. They work against one another for the benefit of the people on other continents, especially those who ruled over them during the colonial era. The undue rivalry among African countries has often robbed the people on the...
(This Day Live 08/01/13)
The World Bank Group committed a record $14.7 billion in fiscal year 2013 (July 2012 to June 2013) to support economic growth and better development prospects in Africa, despite uncertain economic conditions in the rest of the global economy. “The region has shown remarkable resilience in the face of a global recession and continues to grow strongly,” said World Bank Vice President for the Africa Region, Makhtar Diop. “Africa is at the centre of the World Bank Group 2030 goals of ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity, in an environmentally, socially, and fiscally sustainable manner.” The World Bank Group, according to a release from its Nigeria office in Abuja, continued its strong commitment to Africa approving $8.25 billion in...
(Voice of America 07/31/13)
Guinea's government has already seen a two percent jump in revenue since President Alpha Conde came to power nearly three years ago. That increase is due to mining activity as well as an increased tax base, according to the International Monetary Fund's Guinea Representative Abdoul Aziz Wane. “When the new government took office in late 2010 - early 2011, that's where we started seeing the increases in the collection of government revenue, and this trend actually has been continuing,” he said. Wane has confidence peaceful legislative elections, scheduled to be held in late September, could stabilize the business environment even more. “We believe that if elections are held peacefully government revenue will increase even more thanks to higher economic activity...
(Reuters (Eng) 07/31/13)
LAGOS, July 31 | Wed Jul 31, 2013 (Reuters) - The chairman of African lender Ecobank Transnational (ETI) has repaid a set of loans he took from the bank and no company rules were broken by the transactions, Chief Executive Thierry Tanoh said on Wednesday. South African sovereign fund manager PIC, a 20 percent shareholder in the African bank, has said they would wait for the board of directors to investigate and draw conclusions over the allegations around debt taken out by chairman Kolapo Lawson on August 5. The lender itself has said previously that the loans, which the Financial Times reported were the subject of a boardroom battle, were performing. Tanoh said on Wednesday they were contracted two years...
(CNN 07/31/13)
(CNN) -- A decade after Angola emerged from devastating civil war, the sea front road that winds around the bay of its capital, Luanda, is now dotted with multi-million dollar condominiums, exclusive clubs, and boutique stores catering for the country's elite. Most of Luanda's population, however, live in the nearby slums, where health facilities are non-existent and children must work, not study, to survive. Africa's natural resource wealth has certainly fueled a decade of rapid growth, but most Africans have still not seen the benefits. More urgently, rapid population growth combined with deepening inequality could one day prove explosive. It does not have to be this way, of course. Botswana successfully used its diamond wealth to develop quickly, growing from...
(The Guardian 07/30/13)
FBI investigating Beny Steinmetz's company BSGR after lucrative deal to extract iron ore from Simandou mountain range. In Conakry, a gleaming hotel looms over the filth of the city. Behind it a small coastal cove acts like a floating rubbish dump, collecting brightly coloured detritus from the murky Atlantic and distributing it in piles in stubbly black rock pools on the beach. A group of gangly young men sit by an abandoned fishing boat, looking despondently out to sea. But in the gleaming, chandelier-lit hotel lobby it is easy to forget the scenery outside. Here, European, Australian and Brazilian mining executives, in jeans and suit jackets, sip rosé as they check emails. African businessmen huddle in groups, discussing shareholdings and...
(Huffingtonpost 07/27/13)
South Africa's failure to successfully engage some of Africa's most troublesome conflict zones has undermined the country's credibility and cast doubt about whether South Africa should be perceived as the continent's regional military and political leader. Ineffectual leadership is at the heart of the matter. President Zuma has made some dubious decisions regarding South Africa's regional foreign policy, and his inability to meaningfully address the plethora of domestic problems facing the country raises question about its suitability as Africa's de facto leader. Attempts to promote human rights -- a trademark of South Africa's foreign policy for the past 20 years -- have resulted in the adoption of some erratic policy decisions. For example, the South African government has numerous times...
(Business Daily 07/26/13)
Global food prices fell by 2 per cent in the latest four-month period, marking the third straight period of declines, as declining imports in the Middle East and North Africa, and lower demand pushed prices down 12 per cent from their August 2012 peak, the World Bank said on Thursday. The World Bank's Food Price Index showed international prices of wheat fell by 2 per cent, sugar by 6 per cent, soybean oil by 11 per cent, and maize, or corn, by 1 per cent during the four-month period between February and June. The index, which weighs export prices of food, fats and oils, grains, and other foods in nominal U.S. dollars, fell by 2 per cent. Improved weather conditions...
(This Day Live 07/25/13)
African countries and their communities have been told they can effectively end ‘land grabs,’ grow significantly more food across the region, and transform their development prospects if they can modernise the complex governance procedures that govern land ownership and management over the next decade. This was revealed in a new World Bank report titled Securing Africa’s Land for Shared Prosperity released on Monday in Washington, US, which also noted that Africa has the highest poverty rate in the world with 47.5 per cent of the population living below $1.25 a day. The detailed report noted that sub-Saharan Africa is home to nearly half of the world’s usable, uncultivated land but so far the continent has not been able to develop...

Pages

(CNN 07/04/14)
The scientist who discovered the Ebola virus said that a current outbreak of the deadly bug in West Africa, in which 467 people have died, is “unprecedented.” “One, [this is] the first time in West Africa that we have such an outbreak,” Dr. Peter Piot told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour. “Secondly, it is the first time that three countries are involved. And thirdly it’s the first time that we have outbreaks in capitals, in capital cities.” Doctors Without Borders warns that the outbreak in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia is now “out of control.” The number of cases is still spiking since it was first observed around the beginning of this year.
(Voice of America 07/04/14)
A top U.N. health official says West Africa's Ebola outbreak could last several more months. But Keiji Fukuda told the French News Agency AFP Thursday it is impossible to make a clear prediction on how much farther the outbreak could spread. Fukuda spoke in Ghana Thursday at the end of a two-day emergency meeting of African health ministers and other experts. The outbreak has already killed 467 people in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. The ministers made a number of proposals. They include mobilizing community, religious, and political leaders to educate people about the disease and committing more financial resources. The ministers call Ebola a serious threat to all countries in the region and beyond. Ebola is named for the...
(Voice of America 07/03/14)
Health ministers from across West Africa are attending an emergency conference in Ghana to discuss the regional outbreak of Ebola virus disease. The World Health Organization says the highly infectious disease has killed more than 400 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. In Sierra Leone police and medical workers man checkpoints on the outskirts of Kenema -- the site of an Ebola outbreak that is spreading across West Africa. Authorities are forcing people to test for the disease. Some victims try to avoid detection, preferring to die in secret. The outbreak is the worst since the disease was identified in the 1970s, according to Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. "The outbreak in...
(BBC News Africa 07/02/14)
Health ministers from 11 African countries are meeting in Accra, Ghana, in an attempt to "get a grip" on the deadly and worsening Ebola outbreak. So far, 763 people have been infected with the virus - and 468 of these have died. Most of the cases have been in Guinea where the outbreak started. But it has since spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone and is now the biggest and most deadly Ebola outbreak the world has seen, say officials. Health officials from those countries, as well as Ivory Coast, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Senegal, and Uganda will attend the meeting. The World Health Organization says "drastic" action is needed to stamp out the virus...
(Voice of America 06/28/14)
Good news for Africa, say the experts. Growth is healthy and broad-based, fueled in part by infrastructure spending, domestic demand and trade. "A lot of people think growth in Africa is only driven by mineral wealth or oil-exporting countries, but we find that even countries that are not resource rich are still growing.…," said Angela Lusigi, an economist and policy advisor for the Regional Bureau for Africa in the United Nations Development Program. "This is mainly because of their agricultural sector and growth in services [including tourism] and a little in manufacturing." Trade The report found that Africa’s main foreign commercial partner is Europe, which accounted for nearly 40 percent of African trade, while 25 percent was with Asia and...
(Voice of America 06/28/14)
African leaders have called for greater investment in agriculture at the African Union summit closing Friday in Malabo, the capital of Equatorial Guinea. Leaders also discussed concerted efforts to address conflicts smoldering across the continent from South Sudan to Central African Republic. The AU has focused this year's summit on tackling issues of agriculture and climate change as part of the continental body's overall development goals to create jobs and to improve food security. African Union Commission Chairwoman Nkoszana Dlamini Zuma led the call for greater public and private investment to bring high-tech innovation to African farming during summit opening remarks on Thursday. “Our agriculture, in the main, is still quite traditional and not modern. A practical priority, therefore, is...
(BBC News Africa 06/27/14)
"Drastic action" is needed to contain the spread of deadly Ebola in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Nearly 400 people have died in the outbreak which started in Guinea and has spread to neighbouring Sierra Leone and Liberia. It is the largest outbreak in terms of cases, deaths and geographical spread. The WHO said it was "gravely concerned" and there was potential for "further international spread". The outbreak started four months ago and is continuing to spread. So far there have been more than 600 cases and around 60% of those infected with the virus have died. Ebola, a haemorrhagic fever, has no cure and is spread by contact with the fluids of infected people or...
(CNN 06/24/14)
(CNN) -- The deadly Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has hit "unprecedented" proportions, according to relief workers on the ground. "The epidemic is out of control," Dr. Bart Janssens, director of operations for Doctors Without Borders, said in a statement. There have been 567 cases and 350 deaths since the epidemic began in March, according to the latest World Health Organization figures. Ebola virus outbreaks are usually confined to remote areas, making it easier to contain. But this outbreak is different; patients have been identified in 60 locations in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Officials believe the wide footprint of this outbreak is partly because of the close proximity between the jungle where the virus was first identified and...
(Voice of America 06/19/14)
The World Health Organization says Ebola is still spreading in West Africa, where the death toll from the virus has climbed to more than 330. The WHO says local authorities have reported five new deaths in Guinea, four new deaths in Sierra Leone and five new deaths in Liberia during the past week. All of the deaths and more than 30 other suspected cases are centered in the region where the three countries' borders come together. Ebola has continued to spread, despite efforts by international and local health officials to stop transmission of the virus.
(BBC News Africa 06/19/14)
The number of people killed by the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa has risen to 337, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said. Fourteen deaths and 47 new cases were reported across the region over the last week, it added. Guinea is worst-affected with 264 Ebola-related deaths. In Sierra Leone, there have been 49 deaths and in Liberia 24, the WHO said. The three countries have been battling to contain the outbreak since February. The outbreak began in southern Guinea's Guekedou region, but then spread to its neighbours. 'Unmarked borders' More than 500 suspected or confirmed cases of the virus have been recorded, the WHO said. There is no cure or vaccine for Ebola - one of the world's...
(Bloomberg 06/16/14)
Lawmakers in Guinea approved an agreement signed by the government, Rio Tinto, Chinalco and the International Finance Corp. that plans $20 billion investment in the Simandou iron-ore mine. “We congratulate the government for this excellent project,” National Assembly President Claude Kory Kondiano said. “It is a good contract because of the quality of shareholders Rio Tinto, Chinalco and IFC, the World Bank’s private-sector financing arm.” Simandou is the world’s largest untapped iron-ore resource. The deal foresees the construction of a 650-kilometer (403-mile) railway and a deepwater port. By Ougna Camara
(BBC News Africa 06/16/14)
A professional singer, Alama Kante, has sung through surgery to remove a tumour from her throat, so surgeons could avoid damaging her vocal cords. The Guinean singer, who is based in France, was given just a local anaesthetic and hypnotised to help with the pain during the operation in Paris. Kante was nervous about losing her voice, but in a "world first" her surgeon suggested she sing throughout. He said one slip of his scalpel could have destroyed her singing voice. 'Into a trance' Professor Giles Dhonneur, who is head of the anaesthesia and intensive care department at Henri Mondor hospital, performed the operation in April but gave a press conference over the weekend, playing a video of Kante singing...
(Voice of America 06/14/14)
GENEVA — A major wildlife conservation group reports more than 20,000 African elephants were poached across the African continent last year. CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, warns that poaching contributes to the continuing decline in elephant populations. According to CITES, 2013 was the third year in a row more than 20,000 elephants have been killed across the African continent. It says the sharp upward trend in illegal elephant killing observed since the mid-2000s peaked in 2011 and is leveling off.
(BBC News Africa 06/14/14)
The survival of Africa's elephants is under threat, with estimates suggesting more than 20,000 were killed in 2013, a report says. The office of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (Cites) said poaching levels were far above the elephant birth rate. However, the report said poaching numbers had dropped slightly compared to the previous two years. Transnational organised crime appeared to be involved in the trade, it added. Cites, which is based in Geneva, is responsible for regulating the international trade in more than 35,000 species of plants and animals. line There are a number of interesting signals in these latest figures, perhaps indicating that the tougher line being taken by Cites is bearing fruit. For the first...
(Voice of America 06/13/14)
DAKAR — The West Africa Commission on Drugs says the region needs a new approach to tackling drug-related crime. The commission, which released its findings Thursday in Dakar after nearly two years of research, says countries should not criminalize drug use or militarize their approach to traffickers. Over the past decade, West African countries have made headlines seizing tons of narcotics at their coastlines and airports. Thousands of arrests have been made. While it looks impressive on paper, it's not enough.
(International Business Times 06/12/14)
Sierra Leone has shut its trade borders with Guinea and Liberia after more people died from the Ebola outbreak that has hit West Africa over recent months. The Ministry of Health said 16 people have now died in Sierra Leone – doubling the figure from last week – and has taken measures to curb the outbreak, including the closure of schools, cinemas and nightclubs, Reuters reports. Authorities decided to close schools after a nine-year-old tested positive for Ebola after both parents died from the virus. Deputy Minister of Information Theo Nicol told the news agency: "There is more contacts between school-going kids than adults hence the closure of schools in the most affected district." Health officials have also set up...
(BBC News Africa 06/12/14)
Low-level drug offences should be decriminalised in West Africa, according to a high-level report. The West Africa Commission on Drugs says drug cartels are undermining the region by using it to transit cocaine. The commission, headed by former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo, says the cartels should be tackled but that punishing the personal use of drugs does not work. It argues that current policies incite corruption and provoke violence. Drug trafficking and consumption have become major issues in West Africa since the turn of the century. Efforts around this time to stem the flow of cocaine from the producing countries of Latin America to consumers in the US and Europe led criminals to target West Africa as a new route...
(BBC News Africa 06/05/14)
Some 208 people have now died from the Ebola virus in Guinea after a deadly spike in recent days, world health officials say. At least 21 people died and 37 new cases of suspected Ebola were found between 29 May and 1 June, bringing the total number of cases in the West African country to 328. Of these, 193 have been confirmed by laboratory tests. There is no cure or vaccine for Ebola - one of the world's deadliest viruses. Map More than half of the new deaths were in the southern Guekedou region, where the outbreak is centred. Three confirmed and 10 suspected new cases were recorded in neighbouring Sierra Leone over the same period. Six people are believed...
(Voice of America 06/05/14)
DAKAR — The ongoing Ebola outbreak is "resurging" in Guinea, where the virus has killed about 200 people since it appeared in February, and in neighboring Sierra Leone, said Doctors Without Borders on Wednesday. Health workers appeared to be making progress against the outbreak, but Guinea and Sierra Leone are now reporting fresh cases, some in areas previously unaffected by the disease, said the doctors group, known by its French acronym, MSF. MSF said it has seen more than 20 new cases of Ebola at its treatment centers in Guinea in the past week. MSF said areas like the capital, Conakry, and the towns of Gueckedou and Macenta, near the border with Liberia, have seen a spike in the number...
(Voice of America 06/05/14)
Africa analyst Bronwyn Bruton said she does not expect to hear a lot about human rights issues during the forthcoming US/Africa leaders' summit in Washington. Bruton, deputy director of the Africa Center at the US-based Atlantic Council, said she is concerned that the summit might disappoint many of the African leaders if each of them does not get a face-to-face meeting with President Barack Obama to talk specifically about what the United States can do for each country. She said Obama's foreign policy speech to graduates of the US Military Academy at West Point suggested he was proposing the "Africanization of US security policy." "When I heard his speech, what occurred to me is that he's almost talking about the...

Pages