Saturday 20 January 2018

Guinée

(AFP (eng) 01/14/16)
West Africa can expect flare-ups of Ebola in the coming year even if the world's worst outbreak of the disease will be declared effectively over, UN chief Ban Ki-moon said Wednesday. The World Health Organization on Thursday will declare Liberia Ebola-free, joining Guinea and Sierra Leone, which earned that status at the end of last year. For the first time since the outbreak began in December 2013, all three countries will have registered zero cases in at least 42 days, which is twice the incubation period for the virus. But in an address to the General Assembly, Ban warned that the virus could resurface, if in limited fashion. "We can anticipate future flare-ups of Ebola in the coming year," Ban...
(AFP (eng) 01/14/16)
They may have conquered Ebola but survivors of the fever and the heroic workers who saved them face a new struggle: acceptance by communities after the end of the deadly epidemic. The worst outbreak of the tropical fever in history ravaged west Africa over two years, infecting -- by the most conservative estimates -- almost 29,000 people and killing more than a third. It is due to be declared over as Liberia gets the all-clear Thursday, thanks to a brave army of doctors, nurses, grave diggers, contact tracers and others there and in neighbouring Sierra Leone and Guinea. They are celebrated as heroes by their government and the international community, yet many face the harsh reality of stigmatisation rather than...
(The Associated Press 01/14/16)
UNITED NATIONS— U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon celebrated the impending end of West Africa's Ebola epidemic with cautious relief, warning that future flare-ups are inevitable and imploring the world not to let its guard down. Ban said West Africa is on "the cusp of being declared free of Ebola transmission.'' That will happen Thursday when Liberia officially joins Guinea in Sierra Leone in being declared Ebola-free. "These achievements could not have happened without the decisive leadership of the presidents and other national authorities of three affected countries and the engagement of all communities,'' Ban said at a U.N. General Assembly meeting Wednesday marking the milestone. "Of course, significant challenges remain. We can anticipate future flare-ups of Ebola in the coming year.''...
(APA 01/14/16)
World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim is admonishing citizens of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone to take pride in their perseverance and commitment to reach the critical milestone of becoming Ebola free. According to a dispatch from Washington DC, Kim said it was a milestone for Liberia to be declared Ebola free by the World Health Organization (WHO) on Thursday January 14, having successfully put an end to human-to-human transmission of the Ebola virus. He noted that this marks the first time since the start of the epidemic that Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone have reported no cases for at least 42 days. "For two years, the people and governments of the three West African countries have been fighting...
(BBC News Africa 01/14/16)
African exports to China fell by almost 40% in 2015, China's customs office says. China is Africa's biggest single trading partner and its demand for African commodities has fuelled the continent's recent economic growth. The decline in exports reflects the recent slowdown in China's economy. This has, in turn, put African economies under pressure and in part accounts for the falling value of many African currencies. Is China a brake on Africa's progress? Presenting China's trade figures for last year, customs spokesman Huang Songping told journalists that African exports to China totalled $67bn (£46.3bn), which was 38% down on the figure for 2014. BBC Africa Business Report editor Matthew Davies says that as China's economy heads for what many analysts...
(CNN 01/14/16)
(CNN)In 2014, 100 million people were using Facebook each month across Africa, over 80% via mobile. That figure has now jumped to over 120 million. Four and a half million of those Facebook users are based in Kenya, 15 million in Nigeria and 12 million in South Africa, in statistics first reported by Reuters. Overall, around 9% of Africans use social media, with South Africans among the world leaders in time spent on social networks with an average of 3.2 hours a day, compared to a global average of 2.4 hours, according to data from marketing consultants We Are Social. "We discuss life, love, politics, philosophy, and all else one would expect," says Mark Kaigwa, founder of African digital strategy...
(Business Day Ghana 01/14/16)
The World Bank Group has unveiled a new plan that calls for $16 billion in funding to help African people and countries adapt to climate change and build up the continent's resilience to climate shocks. Titled Accelerating Climate resilient and Low-Carbon Development, the African Climate Business Plan will be presented at COP21, the global climate talks in Paris, on November, 30. It lays out measures to boost the resilience of the continent's assets-its people, land, water, and cities- as well as other moves including boosting renewable energy and strengthening early warning systems. "Sub-Saharan Africa is highly vulnerable to climate shocks, and our research shows that could have far-ranging impact - on everything from child impact stunting and malaria to food...
(AFP (eng) 01/13/16)
Monrovia - The world will heave a collective sigh of relief when west Africa's Ebola epidemic is finally declared at an end after claiming more than 11 000 lives over two years. But with a cure still out of reach, and no vaccine on the market, are we better prepared for next time? Important lessons were learnt the hard way from the unprecedented devastation and suffering wrought on Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, the countries hardest hit by the outbreak which started in December 2013, say experts. Epidemiological protocols were improved.
(AFP (eng) 01/13/16)
Gold miner Dauda Kamanda has never been rich, but before Ebola hit Sierra Leone he was getting by selling the nuggets he unearthed to traders who exported them across Africa and the Middle East. Then, one by one, his Lebanese and Senegalese clients in the northern district of Koinadugu fled as the deadly outbreak gripped the country in 2014, and Dauda's $500 (460-euro) monthly income disappeared. "After the buyers fled, I had to take a part-time job carrying luggage at the lorry park for people going to the capital," he told AFP. As the world awaits the announcement on Thursday that the worst-ever Ebola epidemic has been beaten in west Africa, the three most affected countries of Liberia, Guinea and...
(BBC News Africa 01/13/16)
The BBC's southern Africa correspondent Karen Allen looks at the areas in which Africa can expect big social change this year, some of which have seen campaign groups turn to the internet to state their case. They say information is power and we've seen that demonstrated in the past year, with the protests about quality and access to affordable education right across the continent. Watch out for more developments in the #Feesmustfall campaign in South Africa, as students prepare to register for the new academic year. The internet was used to rally support for street protests in opposition to a proposed hike in fees in 2015. It seemed to catch the government of President Jacob Zuma off guard as senior...
(News24 01/13/16)
Sub-Saharan Africa should prioritise addressing the power sector if it is to alleviate domestic impediments to growth, according to the World Bank. In a 2016 report entitled Global Economic Prospects: Spillovers amid Weak Growth released last week, the World Bank said structural reforms are needed to alleviate domestic impediments to growth and to accelerate economic diversification. "Creating the conditions for a more competitive manufacturing sector would require, in particular, a major improvement in providing electricity," said the global bank. "Addressing power sector problems should therefore be a priority." The World Bank said growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is expected to pick up to 4.2% in 2016 after slowing to 3.4% in 2015. "This projection assumes that commodity prices stabilize and electricity...
(The Economist 01/13/16)
With his campaign slogan “work and nothing else”, you might think John Magufuli, Tanzania’s new president, would be a dull subject for satire. Yet austerity can provide a few laughs. In his first few weeks, the new president cancelled independence day celebrations, went litter-picking and turned up at the ministry of finance to make sure staff were actually coming to work. The result, on Twitter, was a hashtag, #whatwouldmagufulido, full of pictures of dubious money-saving ideas: a wooden cart acting as a wedding limousine; a vanity mirror attached with duct tape to a car to replace a broken wing mirror. The joshing was mostly affectionate: Mr Magufuli’s anti-corruption drive is popular. Kenya’s president, Uhuru Kenyatta, comes off less well. The...
(AFP (eng) 01/12/16)
Gold miner Dauda Kamanda has never been rich, but before Ebola hit Sierra Leone he was getting by selling the nuggets he unearthed to traders who exported them across Africa and the Middle East. Then, one by one, his Lebanese and Senegalese clients in the northern district of Koinadugu fled as the deadly outbreak gripped the country in 2014, and Dauda's $500 (460-euro) monthly income disappeared. "After the buyers fled, I had to take a part-time job carrying luggage at the lorry park for people going to the capital," he told AFP.
(Xinhuanet 01/12/16)
(Xinhua) -- The economy of the West African sub-region for the past year was expected to decelerate to 4.7 percent, a 1.3 percentage points lower than the 6.0 percent recorded the previous year. Mohammed Ben Omar Ndiaye, Director for West Africa Monetary Agency (WAMA), said the slump might have been chiefly on account of the slump in the prices of key exports, which affected income levels and consequently consumption and private investment in some countries in the sub-region. Speaking at the 28th Joint Ordinary Meeting of the Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee and the Operations and Administration Committee of WAMA, Ndiaye noted that this economic growth incident was happening in a global space where growth was expected to be at...
(Addis Fortune 01/12/16)
When one walks through cancer wards of public sector hospitals in Africa, the scenes are reminiscent of the battle to get AIDS treatment underway in the early 2000s. But now, hospital beds once filled with AIDS patients are occupied by those afflicted with cancers and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). NCDs are no longer exclusively problems associated with the well-off. Worldwide, roughly 75pc of deaths from NCDs occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In Africa, NCDs are projected to account for roughly 40pc of the disease burden by 2030. The costly, complex and chronic nature of many of these diseases will fuel the rise in health care costs, underscoring the importance of taking action now. NCDs are the silent killers...
(Vanguard 01/12/16)
Relating with the African press corps to Beijing, China, the Deputy Director General, Department of West Asian and African Affairs, Ministry of Commerce, Beijing, China, Mr. Cao Jiachang disclosed China's new blue print to elevating China-Africa partnership, saying that the way forward for China in the new intended relationship with governments of African countries is sustaining stability in order to attain the much needed prosperity that will be mutually benefitting to both China and African countries. According to the Cao, who pointed out that there is a constant need for China and Africa to come together to building a better path to economic progression, China is looking at the positioning of China-Africa relationship in a highly remarkable level, for fact...
(Daily Nation 01/11/16)
As some African leaders are going all out to increase their terms in office, it is gratifying that several are calling for reduced ones. Manoeuvres to prolong presidential terms have included holding referendums aimed at changing constitutions to legalise incumbents' bids to hold onto power, as happened Congo and Rwanda. Ironically, Rwanda's constitutional change that allows President Paul Kagame to stand again next year also shortens the presidential term from seven to five years from 2024. It also allows Kagame two more terms, extending his rule to 2034.
(Business Day 01/11/16)
Several years ago, when food prices started rising sharply, triggering riots from Bangladesh to Yemen, stories began circulating about enormous Chinese landgrabs in Africa. In Zimbabwe, a Chinese company was said to have leased 100,000ha to grow maize for export to China, even while hunger stalked Zimbabwe itself. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, ZTE, a Chinese telecoms company keen on diversification, was apparently investing in a 3-million-hectare palm oil plantation. Chinese businesses were said to control most of Zambia’s fertile farmland. If the stories were to be believed, Chinese companies were engaged in a co-ordinated effort across the continent to take control of agricultural land to feed their ever-more prosperous people back home. It was not the first time...
(The Observer 01/11/16)
The African continent tends to be content on selling its raw materials and produces less than one per cent of the world's manufactured goods. And when it comes to car manufacturing, the industry is almost non-existent on the continent. However, car manufacturers in some countries are taking some steps, if feeble ones, towards significantly contributing to the growth of the industry on a continent that is billed by some economists to turn into the world's economic powerhouse by the turn of the century. In Uganda, last December saw Kiira Motors Corporation (KMC) launch a business strategy meant to establish capacity to manufacture vehicles in Uganda with production expected to start in 2018 through assembling. The Kiira Smack is one of...
(News Day 01/09/16)
A scorching drought in Southern Africa that led to widespread crop failure could nudge African nations to finally embrace genetically modified (GM) crops to improve harvests and reduce grain imports. The drought, which extends to South Africa, the continent’s biggest maize producer, has been exacerbated by an El Nino weather pattern and follows dry spells last year that affected countries from Zimbabwe to Malawi. Aid agency Oxfam has said 10 million people, mostly in Africa, face hunger because of droughts and poor rains.

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(Voice of America 03/30/15)
Guinea's President Alpha Conde has declared a 45-day "health emergency" in five regions in the west and southwest of the Ebola-hit nation in a bid to stem the spread of the deadly disease. Conde announced measures on state TV late Saturday that will enable authorities to restrict people's movements in the districts of Forecariah, Coyah, Dubreka, Boffa and Kindia. He said, "Wherever the need may be, throughout this period, measures of restriction and confinement will be taken."
(Voice of America 03/28/15)
Ebola is an ancient virus that evolved over thousands of years in the Congo Basin. It occurs naturally among a number of different species in the wild. From time to time, humans come in contact with animals that harbor Ebola, setting into motion an animal-to-human transmission chain that causes an epidemic. The U.S.-based Wildlife Conservation Society wants to know more about which animals harbor the virus so efforts can be made to halt the encroachments of Ebola into the human population.
(The New York Times 03/28/15)
The faded plaque to the right of the door said “Jochannan, Yosef B.,” but visitors to this nursing home on the northern edge of the Bronx knew the frail 96-year-old inside by another name: Dr. Ben. As a sign of respect, many would also bend down on one knee. The room was covered in mementos from a life spent between continents, weaving together the threads of the African diaspora: honors and awards, photos of Egyptian statues, kente cloth, a mug decorated with hieroglyphs and piles of letters from admirers and acolytes. Yosef Alfredo Antonio Ben-Jochannan seemed unaware of the shrine that had accumulated around him. His eyes were barely open. He sat hunched in his wheelchair, dressed in baggy pants,...
(Bloomberg 03/27/15)
(Bloomberg) -- Two Ebola vaccines under development by drugmakers will move into final-stage testing, the U.S. National Institutes of Health said, after an analysis of mid-stage trials was deemed successful. One vaccine is from a partnership between the NIH and GlaxoSmithKline Plc, and the second is made by NewLink Genetics Corp. and Merck & Co. Their effectiveness in stopping infections of the deadly disease is being tested in West Africa, where an outbreak has killed more than 10,000 people. About 600 people participated in the first stage of West African testing, according to the NIH. “Now we must move forward to adapt and expand the study so that ultimately we can determine whether these experimental vaccines can protect against Ebola...
(Voice of America 03/27/15)
Scientists are developing an Ebola vaccine for apes that’s designed to protect humans from future outbreaks. While still a number of years off, researchers say the vaccine offers a “win-win” solution for both species, that are sickened and die of Ebola. The handling and consumption of bushmeat -- meat from wild, non-domesticated animals - is a common occurrence in Africa, particularly in the Congo Basin. It's believed meat from an ape infected by the Ebola virus first passed the deadly disease to humans in 1976. There have been more than 20 outbreaks since then. The current Ebola crisis in Western Africa has sickened and killed as many as 10,000 people since last year. It was in all likelihood caused by...
(Xinhuanet 03/27/15)
NEW DELHI, March (Xinhua) -- India will hold a five-day " India-Africa Summit" later this year, where nearly 1,000 delegates will be invited, the Ministry of External Affairs has said. The summit will begin on October 26, and leaders from some 54 countries are expected to attend, the External Affairs Ministry officials said on Wednesday evening. The meeting between the heads of state and government will take place on October 29 and bilateral meetings are being scheduled on October 30, Navtej Sarna, secretary (West) of the ministry, told the media. The summit was earlier slated for December last year, but had to be canceled due to Ebola outbreak in Africa.
(The Guardian 03/27/15)
African elephants could be extinct in the wild within a few decades, experts have warned at a major conservation summit in Botswana that has highlighted an alarming decline in numbers due to poaching for ivory. The Africa Elephant Summit, held at a tourist resort in Kasane, gathered delegates from about 20 countries across Europe, Africa and Asia, including China – which is accused of fuelling the illegal poaching trade. “This species could be extinct in our lifetime, within one or two decades, if the current trend continues,” Dune Ives, senior researcher at Vulcan, a philanthropic organisation run by US billionaire Paul Allen, said. “In five years we may have lost the opportunity to save this magnificent and iconic animal.” The...
(Voice of America 03/26/15)
Ebola appears to do its damage worse in young children than it does in adults, killing 90 percent of children under the age of one who become infected, a new study has found. The joint study by the World Health Organization and Imperial College London found that, although infection rates are lower in children than adults, babies and toddlers who get the disease have a far slimmer chance of survival. The virus, which causes haemorrhagic fever and induces internal and external bleeding, is killing 90 percent of infants in the current outbreak and around 80 percent of children ages between one to four years, the scientists found.
(Bloomberg 03/26/15)
(Bloomberg) -- Japan has invested more in project financing in Africa than China as Asian nations continue to strengthen their economic influence on the continent, according to Linklaters LLP. Japanese investors accounted for $3.5 billion of the $4.2 billion of project funds that Asian nations poured into Africa last year to improve roads, water and sanitation and build oil and gas pipelines, according to the London-based law firm. “Japan now ranks as the most active Asian project finance sponsor in Africa, investing almost three times as much as China, which is often regarded as the most active Asian investor on the continent,” according to the report published Monday. Sub-Saharan African nations are seeking to reverse years of under-investment by moving...
(Xinhuanet 03/25/15)
ARUSHA, Tanzania, March (Xinhua) -- African nations on Tuesday were urged to strengthen their national regulatory infrastructures for the nuclear energy to benefit the continent and its people. The call came at the time when a number of African countries are embarking into harnessing uranium energy to promote nuclear technologies for peaceful use.
(Reuters (Eng) 03/25/15)
JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Google and Facebook are at the forefront of a scramble to win over new African Internet users, offering freebies they say give a leg-up to the poor but which critics argue is a plan to lock in customers on a continent of 1 billion people. Africa's Internet penetration will reach 50 percent by 2025 and there are expected to be 360 million smartphones on the continent by then, roughly double the number in the United States currently, Mckinsey Consultants data shows. Africa had 16 percent Internet penetration and 67 million smartphones in 2013. This growth is attracting interest from Internet companies such as Google, Facebook and Wikipedia, which are striking deals with service providers such as Vodacom,...
(Voice of America 03/24/15)
CONAKRY— March 23 marks one year since the World Health Organization declared an Ebola outbreak in Guinea. More than a year after the first Ebola case was discovered in southeastern Guinea’s forest region, the number of new reported cases continues to increase. The World Health Organization (WHO) says there have now been more than 3,400 cases in Guinea since the outbreak began, and nearly 25,000 overall in West Africa. The WHO says the week ending March 15 saw 95 new cases in Guinea, the highest weekly number since the end of last year. "
(Voice of America 03/24/15)
GENEVA— On the first anniversary of the worst Ebola outbreak in history, a leading medical group is decrying the missed opportunities for preventing this deadly disease from spinning out of control in West Africa. In a bit of soul searching, Doctors Without Borders has issued a critical analysis of the global response to this crisis. The report spares no one. Everyone comes in for criticism, including the authors of the study. The report by Doctors Without Borders, known by its French acronym MSF, is based on interviews with staff involved in the organization’s Ebola intervention.
(Xinhuanet 03/24/15)
MURANG'A, Kenya, March 24 (Xinhua) -- Seated round the table and with chopsticks in their hands, Kenyan students living in suburb slums chatted animatedly while enjoying breakfast before Chinese class. The students are from the Mathare slums in Nairobi, and like many other poor kids living in slums of the capital Nairobi, they had to struggle for a chance of education. "But that was before the Chinese came," said Sharon Mwangi, a pioneer student at Beijing MCEDO School and will complete her secondary education this year. "When I joined this school, many classrooms were made of iron sheets. The environment was polluted and unfriendly to learning. Donation from Chinese companies has improved the classrooms and desks. The youth from this...
(Xinhuanet 03/24/15)
KASANE, Botswana, March 24 (Xinhua) -- A Chinese official has said that China will make more efforts on the fields of management, law enforcement, education and capacity building to help African countries battle elephant poaching. Meng Xianlin, executive director-general of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora Import and Export Management Office of China, made the remarks Monday after the African Elephant Summit in Kasane, Northern Botswana. China has also strengthened law enforcement, Meng said after the meeting, adding that in 2014, China worked together with 28 countries and international organizations where many illegal wildlife trades were seized and involved criminals were captured. According to Meng, China has made commitment of 10 million dollars funds for wildlife conservation to Africa...
(BBC News Africa 03/23/15)
The Ebola outbreak in West Africa will be over by August, the head of the UN Ebola mission has told the BBC. Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed admitted the UN had made mistakes in handling the crisis early on, sometimes acting “arrogantly”. A year after the outbreak was officially declared, the virus has killed more than 10,000 people. The medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres says a “global coalition of inaction” led to tragic consequences. Looking back over the year, the charity suggests its early calls for help were ignored by local governments and the World Health Organization. Most deaths occurred in the worst-affected countries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The head of the UN Ebola response mission told the BBC,...
(Xinhuanet 03/23/15)
NAIROBI, March (Xinhua) -- With the Ebola epidemic still haunting West Africa, China has delivered four rounds of humanitarian aid with a combined value of more than 120 million U. S. dollars and sent hundreds of medical workers to the "frontline" since the breakout in April 2014. Here are key dates in China's anti-Ebola aid in Africa since the breakout in 2014: In May, China sent the first batch of relief goods, mostly for disease prevention, control and treatment, to Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea-Bissau, valued at one million yuan (161, 000 U.S. dollars) for each country. On Aug. 7, the Ministry of Commerce announced China would provide the second batch of relief goods worth 30 million yuan (4...
(Voice of America 03/21/15)
GENEVA— The World Health Organization is vigorously denying accusations that it delayed declaring the Ebola epidemic in West Africa an international public health emergency for political reasons. An article by the Associated Press said secretly obtained e-mails of internal documents indicated the WHO was afraid that declaring a global emergency could set off alarm bells, which could hurt countries’ economies or interfere with the Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca. WHO's spokeswoman on Ebola, Margaret Harris, told VOA that the assertion was categorically untrue. “There was no secrecy.
(Voice of America 03/21/15)
GENEVA— The World Health Organization is calling for the urgent scale-up of mass vaccinations against preventable killer diseases in West Africa’s Ebola-affected countries, now that the deadly disease is on the decline. Many illnesses, including child-killing, vaccine-preventable diseases, have been neglected In West Africa’s Ebola-affected countries. Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea have diverted most of their resources and efforts toward containing the deadly Ebola virus over the past year. Today's WHO announcement came just as officials in Liberia reported the country's first new case of Ebola in weeks, ending hopes that the nation had beaten the deadly virus. Officials say the new patient has been transferred to an Ebola treatment center in the capital, Monrovia. Citing massive help from the...
(The Independent 03/21/15)
For all the reports of war and famine, Africa is booming. Jim Armitage speaks to some of its CEOs at their annual get-together in Geneva. It’s easy to fall into the age-old narrative that Africa is a land hidebound by corruption. But, at the annual Africa CEO Forum in Geneva this week, corporate leaders were pushing a very different theme. In fact, the C-word was one that few delegates wanted to talk about, preferring instead to discuss the same kinds of subjects that one finds repeated and rehashed in any Western corporate forum: successful corporate acquisitions, the rise of digital technology, corporate governance in family-owned businesses. The atmosphere is upbeat. In Africa, far from being vilified like they often are...

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(The Africa Report 08/30/13)
George Ferreira Vice-president and chief operating officer, Samsung Electronics Africa. Samsung Electronics is preparing to beat its $10bn target for revenue from Africa in 2015. And according to George Ferreira - Vice-president and chief operating officer of Samsung Africa - the company is also looking at the possibility of setting up more assembly plants to avoid tariff barriers. The Africa Report: Is South Africa still your biggest African market, and do you expect it to be so for the new Samsung Galaxy S4? George Ferreira: For the S4, I would say that the South African market is probably on par with the Nigerian market, although I foresee that the Nigerian market should probably overtake the South African market in terms...
(UKzambians 08/29/13)
Leaders from the UK’s African diaspora are being invited to join a powerful new network aimed at supporting sustainable development across the African continent. Working in collaboration with Comic Relief and Unbound Philanthropy, the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) aims to harness the power of the UK diaspora in order to combat persistent levels of poverty and unemployment among their communities in the UK and Africa. Over a period of more than a year, participants will be tasked with identifying and developing a ‘venture’ – business, social enterprise or project – that addresses a particular cause or issue they are passionate about. The new leadership programme will build on individuals’ knowledge and skills and add to the already extensive levels...
(Voice of America 08/26/13)
DHL calls itself the “logistics company for the world,” providing transportation via rail, road, sea and air. And Company officials see Africa as a place where its business can boom. For that to happen, though, more international companies will need to invest in the continent and base their operations there. DHL’s Sumesh Rahavendra sees that happening. That’s one of the findings from a recent global technological conference sponsored by his company.“There’s quite a bit of evidence to that in terms of global companies starting to set up base in Africa. If you look at the likes of SAP or IBM or Hisense, which is the Chinese company, all of them are setting base in Africa and looking at how specifically...
(The Associated Press 08/26/13)
The United Nations world tourism body said Sunday it has chosen Zimbabwe to lead its Commission for Africa, the continent-wide group for tourism development for the next two years. The U.N. World Tourism Organization said that conflict-troubled Mali also joins the African tourism commission. Zimbabwe and Zambia are co-hosting the 155-nation tourism organization's summit, held every two years, at the resort of Victoria Falls on their common border. The six-day general assembly was formally opened by the two countries' presidents, Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe and Michael Sata of Zambia. The United Nations said in a statement that July 31 elections in Zimbabwe, bitterly disputed over alleged rigging, "will be respected by the assembly." Australia, Britain, Canada and the United States...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/21/13)
(Reuters) - Tanzania-focused miner African Barrick Gold pinned its turnaround hopes on a new chief executive on Wednesday, appointing industry veteran Bradley A Gordon to replace Greg Hawkins at the helm of the struggling group. The FTSE 250 company, whose poor performance meant it was under pressure even before a gold price rout began in April, said Gordon's appointment would be effective immediately. Gordon, who has worked in the gold mining industry for 30 years, was previously CEO of Intrepid Mines, the Canadian and Australian listed precious metals exploration and development company with primary operations in Indonesia. Analysts welcomed the change, and said Gordon's his lack of African experience was balanced by his ability to manage difficult operations. "The announcement...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/21/13)
LONDON | Wed Aug 21, 2013 (Reuters) - Tanzania-focused miner African Barrick Gold on Wednesday named industry veteran Bradley A Gordon as its new chief executive, succeeding Greg Hawkins who has resigned to pursue other opportunities. African Barrick was under pressure even before a gold price rout began in April, hit by illegal mining, power generation problems and strikes, issues which forced it to warn in February that output would shrink for a fifth straight year. Gordon, who has worked in the gold mining industry for 30 years, was previously CEO of Intrepid Mines, the Canadian and Australian listed precious metals exploration and development company with primary operations in Indonesia. African Barrick initiated a review of its operations earlier this...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/21/13)
SYDNEY | Wed Aug 21, 2013 (Reuters) - Australian mining mogul Clive Palmer says his oil and gas business has identified what could be one of the world's largest gas fields off the coast of Papua New Guinea, potentially worth $35 billion. After $50 million worth of exploration over 3,000 square km, the northern region of the Gulf of Papua was found to have about 28 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas. "The results of the studies are extremely favorable and show this new Papua New Guinea gas region could possibly be as significant a resource area as the North West Shelf in Western Australia," said Palmer in a statement. The region, 12 km (7 miles) from the coastline, is...
(Times of swaziland 08/14/13)
MBABANE – As talks regarding the extension of AGOA post 2015 kicked off on Monday in Ethiopia’s Capital City Addis Ababa, Swaziland and other 49 African countries will be very lucky to see the legislation extended with the same existing terms and conditions, International Business Times has reported. Swaziland is one of the 49 AGOA beneficiaries. AGOA stands for Africa Growth Opportunity Act. AGOA was signed into law in 2000; it offers incentives mostly in the form of duty-free trade access to 49 eligible sub-Saharan economies to liberalise their markets and build connections with American trade partners. The agreement expires in 2015, and US and African officials would be setting fresh terms for its renewal. According to International Business Times,...
(Reuters 08/14/13)
LONDON | Wed Aug 14, 2013 (Reuters) - Iron ore mining group African Minerals (AMIq.L) surprised the market on Wednesday with the abrupt departure of both chief executive and chief financial officer and said it was scrapping expansion plans to focus on existing operations. Its shares fell almost 15 percent despite what some analysts said could prove a positive as the company concentrates on its Sierra Leone mine, Tonkolili. "From the onset it was clear that (Chief Executive Keith)Calder's broader ambition was to grow African Minerals into a diversified miner across West Africa in the near term," Jefferies analysts said in a note. "Perhaps our greatest concern for African Minerals in recent months was that the company would move too...
(Bloomberg 08/13/13)
China has begun looking at funding a railway and port that would service Rio Tinto Group’s Simandou iron project in Guinea and cost more than $10 billion, said four people with direct knowledge of the matter. The agency overseeing companies owned by China’s central government has gauged interest from state rail and port builders and also contacted China Development Bank Corp. about providing financing, said the people, who asked not to be identified as they weren’t authorized to speak publicly about the matter. Guinea’s inability to fund the rail line from its coast to Simandou, described by Rio as the world’s largest untapped deposit of iron ore, has “effectively frozen” the project, former mines minister Mahmoud Thiam said in April...
(Voice of America 08/13/13)
NAIROBI — The United States is keeping a close watch on potential European trade deals with African nations as Washington reviews its own preferential trade initiative with the continent. African ministers and U.S. officials discussed trade relations at a forum Monday in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa. The U.S. is considering an extension to the popular African Growth and Opportunity Act, known as AGOA, an American law that allows sub-Saharan African countries to export certain products to the United States duty free. First signed into law in 2000, the act has already been renewed once, and is set to expire in 2015. U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman has been meeting with African ministers at an AGOA forum in Addis Ababa...
(Reuters 08/09/13)
LONDON | Fri Aug 9, 2013 (Reuters) - Goldman Sachs (GS.N) has appointed Alasdair Warren as head of its financial sponsors group for Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), according to a memo seen by Reuters. Financial sponsors, the term investment banks use to describe private equity firms, are regular users of equity capital markets for selling shares in their portfolio companies. London-based Warren, who joined Goldman in 2005 and was named a partner in 2008, was previously head of equity capital markets (ECM), convertibles and equity derivatives for EMEA. Richard Cormack and Christoph Stanger will jointly take on that role, becoming co-heads of ECM and convertibles in EMEA, the memo said. A spokeswoman for Goldman Sachs confirmed the contents...
( FOROYAA Newspaper 08/07/13)
With its abundance of natural resources and large and growing population , Africa is the next frontier for many global companies. However, while investors are keen to get, there's often a wariness on the part of Africans. The BBC's Vineet Khare travelled to Ethiopia to find out about what can be a tricky relationship and how things are not always so rosy. Watch the video...
(Business Daily 08/06/13)
The top-ranking US trade official Michael Froman said on Monday that issues of "reciprocity" will be raised at a US-Africa conference next week in Ethiopia that will consider renewal of the Agoa trade initiative. The African Growth and Opportunity Act, which is due to expire in 2015, gives duty-free treatment to Kenyan textiles and many other African exports to the United States. Agoa is said to be responsible for creating thousands of jobs in the Kenyan textile industry. But as a condition to Agoa's extension beyond 2015, American negotiators may press African countries to give the same preferential treatment to US exports to Africa. Ambassador Froman made clear in a talk at the Brookings Institution in Washington that the US...
(Reuters 08/06/13)
LAGOS/SYDNEY, Aug 6 (Reuters) - Nigeria is gradually opening up to Islamic finance, a move that could bring non-interest banking to over 80 million Muslims and develop one of Africa's fastest-growing consumer and corporate banking sectors. Home to the largest Muslim population in sub-Saharan Africa, Nigeria is trying to establish itself as the African hub for Islamic finance, which follows religious principles such as bans on interest and gambling. In recent months, a string of regulatory initiatives have set the groundwork for products such as Islamic bonds (sukuk), insurance (takaful) and interbank lending products, although there is still only a small number of local market participants. "The potential is there but the market is negligible in Nigeria because we have...
(African arguments 08/02/13)
UK Minister for Africa, Mark Simmonds, has stated that the government will not intervene directly in Barclays Bank's decision to withdraw banking services to Money Service Businesses (MSBs) including those that provide remittance services to Somalia, but said he hoped that a 'market-based solution' could be found. Simmonds stated in a letter dated 18th July to SOAS academic Laura Hammond (and shared with African Arguments) that "the government would not be able to intervene on behalf of a particular company or 'remittance corridor'". He was responding to a letter submitted by Hammond on behalf of 105 academics, researchers and practitioners calling on the UK government to intervene to prevent the collapse of remittance flows into poor and fragile states, particularly...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/02/13)
LONDON | Fri Aug 2, 2013 (Reuters) - The winning investment strategy of 2013 has been simple but extreme: return home to the safety of the biggest, most-traded markets, or venture to the riskiest frontiers from Ivory Coast to Pakistan. Those in the middle of the risk curve - the biggest emerging markets that now account for almost half of the top 20 world economies - have been the big losers. The contrasting fortunes may herald the start of a broader repricing of big emerging economies where a flood of cheap money from developed economies has distorted prices the most. Risk - which dominated global financial markets in the past few years - has played a smaller role in defining...
(This Day Live 08/02/13)
Against the backdrop of the three-day investment roundtable in Cape Town, South Africa, John Iwori, who attended the event, writes that African countries are forging a common front in the shipping and energy sectors of the continent's economy. Working against One Another That most African countries are working at cross purposes is an understatement. In spite of their proximity, they prefer to work against their common interests. They hardly see each other as partners in progress. In fact, they see themselves as enemies. They work against one another for the benefit of the people on other continents, especially those who ruled over them during the colonial era. The undue rivalry among African countries has often robbed the people on the...
(This Day Live 08/01/13)
The World Bank Group committed a record $14.7 billion in fiscal year 2013 (July 2012 to June 2013) to support economic growth and better development prospects in Africa, despite uncertain economic conditions in the rest of the global economy. “The region has shown remarkable resilience in the face of a global recession and continues to grow strongly,” said World Bank Vice President for the Africa Region, Makhtar Diop. “Africa is at the centre of the World Bank Group 2030 goals of ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity, in an environmentally, socially, and fiscally sustainable manner.” The World Bank Group, according to a release from its Nigeria office in Abuja, continued its strong commitment to Africa approving $8.25 billion in...
(Voice of America 07/31/13)
Guinea's government has already seen a two percent jump in revenue since President Alpha Conde came to power nearly three years ago. That increase is due to mining activity as well as an increased tax base, according to the International Monetary Fund's Guinea Representative Abdoul Aziz Wane. “When the new government took office in late 2010 - early 2011, that's where we started seeing the increases in the collection of government revenue, and this trend actually has been continuing,” he said. Wane has confidence peaceful legislative elections, scheduled to be held in late September, could stabilize the business environment even more. “We believe that if elections are held peacefully government revenue will increase even more thanks to higher economic activity...

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(BBC News Africa 07/09/14)
Health officials in West Africa say 25 more people have died from Ebola since 3 July, taking the total number of deaths to 518. The World Health Organization (WHO) said 50 new cases of the deadly disease had also been reported. A WHO spokesman said health workers were struggling to contain the outbreak in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea. On Monday, a doctor in Ghana said preliminary tests on a US citizen showed he did not have the disease. But further tests are now being carried out. The man had recently visited Sierra Leone and Guinea and was quarantined after showing signs of the virus. 'A mixed picture' In a statement on Tuesday, the WHO said the latest figures from...
(CNN 07/07/14)
(CNN) -- With their countries facing an Ebola epidemic of "unprecedented" proportions, the health ministers of 11 African nations have agreed to a joint strategy to try to stem its deadly advance. As part of the plan, the World Health Organization will set up a "sub-regional control center" in Guinea -- one of the three West African nations at the heart of the outbreak -- to help coordinate the response. The strategy was announced late Thursday at the end of a two-day summit in Ghana that brought together ministers from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Mali, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Uganda with health experts, Ebola survivors and WHO representatives. It also calls...
(CNN 07/04/14)
The scientist who discovered the Ebola virus said that a current outbreak of the deadly bug in West Africa, in which 467 people have died, is “unprecedented.” “One, [this is] the first time in West Africa that we have such an outbreak,” Dr. Peter Piot told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour. “Secondly, it is the first time that three countries are involved. And thirdly it’s the first time that we have outbreaks in capitals, in capital cities.” Doctors Without Borders warns that the outbreak in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia is now “out of control.” The number of cases is still spiking since it was first observed around the beginning of this year.
(Voice of America 07/04/14)
A top U.N. health official says West Africa's Ebola outbreak could last several more months. But Keiji Fukuda told the French News Agency AFP Thursday it is impossible to make a clear prediction on how much farther the outbreak could spread. Fukuda spoke in Ghana Thursday at the end of a two-day emergency meeting of African health ministers and other experts. The outbreak has already killed 467 people in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. The ministers made a number of proposals. They include mobilizing community, religious, and political leaders to educate people about the disease and committing more financial resources. The ministers call Ebola a serious threat to all countries in the region and beyond. Ebola is named for the...
(Voice of America 07/03/14)
Health ministers from across West Africa are attending an emergency conference in Ghana to discuss the regional outbreak of Ebola virus disease. The World Health Organization says the highly infectious disease has killed more than 400 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. In Sierra Leone police and medical workers man checkpoints on the outskirts of Kenema -- the site of an Ebola outbreak that is spreading across West Africa. Authorities are forcing people to test for the disease. Some victims try to avoid detection, preferring to die in secret. The outbreak is the worst since the disease was identified in the 1970s, according to Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. "The outbreak in...
(BBC News Africa 07/02/14)
Health ministers from 11 African countries are meeting in Accra, Ghana, in an attempt to "get a grip" on the deadly and worsening Ebola outbreak. So far, 763 people have been infected with the virus - and 468 of these have died. Most of the cases have been in Guinea where the outbreak started. But it has since spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone and is now the biggest and most deadly Ebola outbreak the world has seen, say officials. Health officials from those countries, as well as Ivory Coast, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Senegal, and Uganda will attend the meeting. The World Health Organization says "drastic" action is needed to stamp out the virus...
(Voice of America 06/28/14)
Good news for Africa, say the experts. Growth is healthy and broad-based, fueled in part by infrastructure spending, domestic demand and trade. "A lot of people think growth in Africa is only driven by mineral wealth or oil-exporting countries, but we find that even countries that are not resource rich are still growing.…," said Angela Lusigi, an economist and policy advisor for the Regional Bureau for Africa in the United Nations Development Program. "This is mainly because of their agricultural sector and growth in services [including tourism] and a little in manufacturing." Trade The report found that Africa’s main foreign commercial partner is Europe, which accounted for nearly 40 percent of African trade, while 25 percent was with Asia and...
(Voice of America 06/28/14)
African leaders have called for greater investment in agriculture at the African Union summit closing Friday in Malabo, the capital of Equatorial Guinea. Leaders also discussed concerted efforts to address conflicts smoldering across the continent from South Sudan to Central African Republic. The AU has focused this year's summit on tackling issues of agriculture and climate change as part of the continental body's overall development goals to create jobs and to improve food security. African Union Commission Chairwoman Nkoszana Dlamini Zuma led the call for greater public and private investment to bring high-tech innovation to African farming during summit opening remarks on Thursday. “Our agriculture, in the main, is still quite traditional and not modern. A practical priority, therefore, is...
(BBC News Africa 06/27/14)
"Drastic action" is needed to contain the spread of deadly Ebola in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Nearly 400 people have died in the outbreak which started in Guinea and has spread to neighbouring Sierra Leone and Liberia. It is the largest outbreak in terms of cases, deaths and geographical spread. The WHO said it was "gravely concerned" and there was potential for "further international spread". The outbreak started four months ago and is continuing to spread. So far there have been more than 600 cases and around 60% of those infected with the virus have died. Ebola, a haemorrhagic fever, has no cure and is spread by contact with the fluids of infected people or...
(CNN 06/24/14)
(CNN) -- The deadly Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has hit "unprecedented" proportions, according to relief workers on the ground. "The epidemic is out of control," Dr. Bart Janssens, director of operations for Doctors Without Borders, said in a statement. There have been 567 cases and 350 deaths since the epidemic began in March, according to the latest World Health Organization figures. Ebola virus outbreaks are usually confined to remote areas, making it easier to contain. But this outbreak is different; patients have been identified in 60 locations in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Officials believe the wide footprint of this outbreak is partly because of the close proximity between the jungle where the virus was first identified and...
(Voice of America 06/19/14)
The World Health Organization says Ebola is still spreading in West Africa, where the death toll from the virus has climbed to more than 330. The WHO says local authorities have reported five new deaths in Guinea, four new deaths in Sierra Leone and five new deaths in Liberia during the past week. All of the deaths and more than 30 other suspected cases are centered in the region where the three countries' borders come together. Ebola has continued to spread, despite efforts by international and local health officials to stop transmission of the virus.
(BBC News Africa 06/19/14)
The number of people killed by the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa has risen to 337, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said. Fourteen deaths and 47 new cases were reported across the region over the last week, it added. Guinea is worst-affected with 264 Ebola-related deaths. In Sierra Leone, there have been 49 deaths and in Liberia 24, the WHO said. The three countries have been battling to contain the outbreak since February. The outbreak began in southern Guinea's Guekedou region, but then spread to its neighbours. 'Unmarked borders' More than 500 suspected or confirmed cases of the virus have been recorded, the WHO said. There is no cure or vaccine for Ebola - one of the world's...
(Bloomberg 06/16/14)
Lawmakers in Guinea approved an agreement signed by the government, Rio Tinto, Chinalco and the International Finance Corp. that plans $20 billion investment in the Simandou iron-ore mine. “We congratulate the government for this excellent project,” National Assembly President Claude Kory Kondiano said. “It is a good contract because of the quality of shareholders Rio Tinto, Chinalco and IFC, the World Bank’s private-sector financing arm.” Simandou is the world’s largest untapped iron-ore resource. The deal foresees the construction of a 650-kilometer (403-mile) railway and a deepwater port. By Ougna Camara
(BBC News Africa 06/16/14)
A professional singer, Alama Kante, has sung through surgery to remove a tumour from her throat, so surgeons could avoid damaging her vocal cords. The Guinean singer, who is based in France, was given just a local anaesthetic and hypnotised to help with the pain during the operation in Paris. Kante was nervous about losing her voice, but in a "world first" her surgeon suggested she sing throughout. He said one slip of his scalpel could have destroyed her singing voice. 'Into a trance' Professor Giles Dhonneur, who is head of the anaesthesia and intensive care department at Henri Mondor hospital, performed the operation in April but gave a press conference over the weekend, playing a video of Kante singing...
(Voice of America 06/14/14)
GENEVA — A major wildlife conservation group reports more than 20,000 African elephants were poached across the African continent last year. CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, warns that poaching contributes to the continuing decline in elephant populations. According to CITES, 2013 was the third year in a row more than 20,000 elephants have been killed across the African continent. It says the sharp upward trend in illegal elephant killing observed since the mid-2000s peaked in 2011 and is leveling off.
(BBC News Africa 06/14/14)
The survival of Africa's elephants is under threat, with estimates suggesting more than 20,000 were killed in 2013, a report says. The office of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (Cites) said poaching levels were far above the elephant birth rate. However, the report said poaching numbers had dropped slightly compared to the previous two years. Transnational organised crime appeared to be involved in the trade, it added. Cites, which is based in Geneva, is responsible for regulating the international trade in more than 35,000 species of plants and animals. line There are a number of interesting signals in these latest figures, perhaps indicating that the tougher line being taken by Cites is bearing fruit. For the first...
(Voice of America 06/13/14)
DAKAR — The West Africa Commission on Drugs says the region needs a new approach to tackling drug-related crime. The commission, which released its findings Thursday in Dakar after nearly two years of research, says countries should not criminalize drug use or militarize their approach to traffickers. Over the past decade, West African countries have made headlines seizing tons of narcotics at their coastlines and airports. Thousands of arrests have been made. While it looks impressive on paper, it's not enough.
(International Business Times 06/12/14)
Sierra Leone has shut its trade borders with Guinea and Liberia after more people died from the Ebola outbreak that has hit West Africa over recent months. The Ministry of Health said 16 people have now died in Sierra Leone – doubling the figure from last week – and has taken measures to curb the outbreak, including the closure of schools, cinemas and nightclubs, Reuters reports. Authorities decided to close schools after a nine-year-old tested positive for Ebola after both parents died from the virus. Deputy Minister of Information Theo Nicol told the news agency: "There is more contacts between school-going kids than adults hence the closure of schools in the most affected district." Health officials have also set up...
(BBC News Africa 06/12/14)
Low-level drug offences should be decriminalised in West Africa, according to a high-level report. The West Africa Commission on Drugs says drug cartels are undermining the region by using it to transit cocaine. The commission, headed by former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo, says the cartels should be tackled but that punishing the personal use of drugs does not work. It argues that current policies incite corruption and provoke violence. Drug trafficking and consumption have become major issues in West Africa since the turn of the century. Efforts around this time to stem the flow of cocaine from the producing countries of Latin America to consumers in the US and Europe led criminals to target West Africa as a new route...
(BBC News Africa 06/05/14)
Some 208 people have now died from the Ebola virus in Guinea after a deadly spike in recent days, world health officials say. At least 21 people died and 37 new cases of suspected Ebola were found between 29 May and 1 June, bringing the total number of cases in the West African country to 328. Of these, 193 have been confirmed by laboratory tests. There is no cure or vaccine for Ebola - one of the world's deadliest viruses. Map More than half of the new deaths were in the southern Guekedou region, where the outbreak is centred. Three confirmed and 10 suspected new cases were recorded in neighbouring Sierra Leone over the same period. Six people are believed...

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