Sunday 25 June 2017
(AFP (eng) 06/05/17)
Foreign observers on Monday described Lesotho's weekend election as "largely peaceful" despite the shock deployment of armed soldiers at polling stations on voting day. Counting was underway Monday in the restive mountain kingdom, which has been rocked by attempted coups and instability in recent years. Regional observers said the snap polls were "largely peaceful" but called for post-election reforms to bring stability to a country hit by chronic political infighting and suffering from weak government institutions. "Elections alone cannot address the underlying political and structural challenges facing the country," said Joaquim Chissano, the former...
(AFP (eng) 06/04/17)
Election officials in the mountain kingdom of Lesotho on Sunday investigated why armed soldiers had been deployed at many polling stations on voting day. The army has often been accused of interfering in politics in Lesotho, a landlocked African country of two million people that has been hit by attempted coups and instability in recent years. "The nation, the voters and even the observers were surprised... they felt that some voters were intimidated," Independent Electoral Commission spokesman Tuoe Hantsi told reporters. "The law dictates who should be at the polling stations, and (the soldiers) caused confusion."
(AFP (eng) 06/03/17)
Voters in the small southern African kingdom of Lesotho cast ballots Saturday in an election widely expected to lead to another fractious coalition government and the risk of deepening instability. It is the third general election since 2012 in Lesotho, where years of political in-fighting have undermined attempts to tackle dire poverty and unemployment. Long queues formed outside polling stations from early morning, with many voters wearing traditional Basotho blankets to ward off the winter chill. The snap election was announced in March when Prime Minister Pakalitha Mosisili lost a no-confidence vote after his seven-party coalition government broke up less than two years after it was formed.
(AFP (eng) 06/03/17)
Two veteran former prime ministers lead the field in Lesotho's election on Saturday, in a vote likely to result in another coalition government for the landlocked mountain kingdom. The country's political landscape has been dominated for years by party splits and fragile coalitions. Pakalitha Mosisili Mosisili, the 72-year-old leader of the Democratic Congress (DC) party, is running to serve as prime minister for the third time, having stepped down after losing a no-confidence vote in March. He was first premier from 1998 to 2012, and returned to power in 2015 after a snap election. Despite his long years in office, critics accuse him doing little to improve standards of living for the majority of people in the country who languish...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/03/17)
Lesotho's people braved winter cold to vote in a general election on Saturday just two years after the previous one as the mountainous southern African kingdom struggles with political instability. The landlocked country, surrounded by South Africa, has had King Letsie III as head of state since 1996, but political leadership has been volatile in recent years with the last two elections failing to produce a winner with a clear majority. Prime Minister Pakalitha Mosisili, who had been in power since 2015, lost a confidence vote in parliament in March after several defections by ruling coalition lawmakers to the opposition eroded his support. Democratic Congress party leader Mosisili's main rival is All Basotho Convention head Thomas Thabane, who governed from...
(AFP (eng) 06/02/17)
Lesotho former prime minister Thomas Thabane, who is fighting to regain power in Saturday's elections, will never forget fleeing his official residence in 2014 as rogue soldiers apparently sought to kill him. The attempted coup was just one chapter of the recurrent political instability that has plagued Lesotho, a mountain kingdom surrounded by South Africa. "It was the most undignified thing that happened to me, to wear (just) my pants... and go through the fence with my wife, running away from the state house," Thabane told AFP ahead of the vote. The attempted coup was followed by elections in 2015, when Thabane was ousted from power by a coalition government that collapsed earlier
(Lesotho Times 06/02/17)
SIX of the country's political parties this week agreed on the need to prioritise policies to grow the economy in the aftermath of Saturday's snap elections. The parties, namely, the All Basotho Convention (ABC), Basotho National Party (BNP), Lesotho Congress for Democracy (LCD), Democratic Congress (DC), Majalefa Development Movement (MDM) and the Movement for Economic Change (MEC) participated at The Hook Up Dinner (THUD) - Election Debate on Tuesday night. THUD is a monthly event that provides a platform to prospective entrepreneurs to pitch their business ideas to potential investors and prominent business people who can mentor them. The event is organised by The Entrepreneurs Network (TEN), a non-profit platform of programmes and initiatives aimed at growing an entrepreneurial ecosystem...
(Bloomberg 06/02/17)
Pakalitha Mosisili and Thomas Thabane will resume their long-running battle to lead Lesotho when the southern African mountain kingdom holds its third election in five years on Saturday. Mosisili, the leader of the ruling Democratic Congress, served as prime minister from May 1998 to June 2012, when he lost power to Thabane, who heads the All Basotho Convention. Mosisili reclaimed the post in 2015 elections, but the opposition forced him from office after winning a motion of no confidence in his seven-party coalition government on March 1. Mosisili, who draws most of his support from rural southern Lesotho, has pledged to introduce free high-school education, build a new railway and raise factory workers’ salaries by 9 percent. Thabane, who has...
(Lesotho Times 06/02/17)
IF crowd sizes at last weekend's political rallies is anything to go by, the battle for State house will likely be between the All Basotho Convention (ABC) and the Democratic Alliance-Lesotho Congress for Democracy axis. Basotho will go to the polls on Saturday to choose their National Assembly representatives, and by implication, the country's next prime minister after the collapse of the seven-party governing coalition. Following the dissolution of the august house by King Letsie III on 6 March 2017 and His Majesty's eventual proclamation of 3 June 2017 as election day, the country's 30 registered political parties have been trying to win the hearts and minds of Basotho through campaign rallies. Last weekend's rallies were an opportunity for the...
(Xinhuanet 06/02/17)
Fifty-four African Union member states will convene the 5th Continental Conference of Solidarity with Cuba in the Namibian capital from June 5-7, said an Naminian official on Thursday. The Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of International relations and Cooperation, Selma Ashipala-Musavyi, said the aim of hosting the conference in Namibia is to intensify solidarity and to strengthen bounds of friendship between the people of Cuba and the progressive peoples throughout the African Continent. Namibia's President Hage Geingob will open and address the conference, which will run under the theme, "Intensifying Solidarity and continuing the legacy of Fidel and Che". The conference, which will also be attended by a Cuban delegation, will also recognize the important work done in support of...
(AFP (eng) 06/01/17)
Two veteran former prime ministers lead the field ahead of Lesotho's election on Saturday, in a vote likely to result in another coalition government for the landlocked mountain kingdom. The country's political landscape has been dominated for years by party splits and fragile coalitions. Pakalitha Mosisili Mosisili, the 72-year-old leader of the Democratic Congress (DC) party, is running to serve as prime minister for the third time, having stepped down after losing a no-confidence vote in March. He was first premier from 1998 to 2012, and returned to power in 2015 after a snap election. Despite his long years in office, critics accuse him doing little to improve the standard of living for the majority of people in the country...
(AFP (eng) 06/01/17)
The southern African mountain kingdom of Lesotho holds a snap election on Saturday, with experts predicting another fractious coalition government, unlikely to tackle its dire levels of HIV-AIDS and unemployment. The vote is the third general election since 2012 in the country known as Africa's Switzerland where years of political in-fighting have stymied attempts to fight poverty. Lesotho, with a population of about two million people, is surrounded by South Africa, which relies on it for essential water supplies to Johannesburg and other cities. Parliament was dissolved in March when Prime Minister Pakalitha Mosisili lost a vote of no confidence after his seven-party coalition government broke up within two years of being formed. His predecessor, Thomas Thabane, came to power...
(AFP (eng) 06/01/17)
One in five children born with a twin sibling in sub-Saharan Africa dies before the age of five -- three times the rate among singletons, said a study Thursday. Almost two-thirds die in the first month of life -- often succumbing to the after-effects of a difficult birth or entering the world too early or underweight, according to research published in The Lancet medical journal. And while rates of under-five deaths in the sub-Saharan African region have declined over two decades, the improvement has been much slower for twins than for single-borns. "Twins account for 10.7 percent of all under-five deaths and 15.1 percent of neonatal (newborn) deaths in the region and these percentages are increasing," the study said. "The...
(Washington Post 05/31/17)
The old man’s house had become a camp for the displaced. In the back yard, groups of women boiled water for rice. Small children skittered across the dirt, running into the bedroom, where they careened around the long, skinny legs of Elijah Karama. “Because of the conditions, they are mine to take care of,” said Karama, 57, more tired than proud. By conditions, he meant Boko Haram’s destruction of vast areas of northeastern Nigeria, and the hunger crisis that has followed. This city of about 1 million has absorbed an additional 1 million people who fled the Islamist militants who burned their villages and kidnapped hundreds of children. In Maiduguri, the vast majority of the displaced aren’t living in U.N...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/27/17)
Leaders of the Group of Seven wealthy nations met African heads of state on Saturday, the final day of their annual summit which has been marked by discord over climate change, but unity on tackling terrorism. Italy had hoped to make Africa the major focus of the annual G7 gathering, holding the discussions on the island of Sicily that has taken in hundreds of thousands of migrants over the past four years as they flee war and poverty back home. However, the two-day meeting got overshadowed by a suicide bombing in northern England on Monday that killed 22 people, and also got bogged down by lengthy discussions on the merit of free trade and the 2015 Paris Agreement to tackle...
(AFP (eng) 05/26/17)
Entertainment | France | film | festival | Cannes | Zambia | witchcraft Cannes, France | AFP | Friday 5/26/2017 - 14:01 UTC+3 | 615 words by Katy Lee Being accused of witchcraft is no laughing matter in Africa -- but movie director Rungano Nyoni decided a dose of humour was just what was needed to tackle a problem rampant in parts of the continent. Set in Zambia, the sharp satire "I Am Not A Witch" has premiered to strong reviews at the Cannes film festival, taking aim at the blatant sexism behind accusations that overwhelmingly target women. White tourists are seen gawping at women detained in a "witch camp" in the movie, taking pictures of them as if they're...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/24/17)
When U.S. President Donald Trump and other leaders of the world's seven major industrialized nations gather in Sicily on Friday, they will enjoy a spectacular view of the Mediterranean Sea, but won't get any glimpse of boats full of migrants. A common sight off Sicily in recent years, the authorities have banned all migrant landings on the island during the Group of Seven Summit for security reasons, telling rescue vessels that pick them up at sea to take them to the mainland during the two-day meeting. Out of sight does not mean out of mind. Italy chose to host the summit in Taormina, on the cliffs of eastern Sicily, to concentrate minds on Europe's migrant crisis and to seek ways...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/23/17)
Fossils from Greece and Bulgaria of an ape-like creature that lived 7.2 million years ago may fundamentally alter the understanding of human origins, casting doubt on the view that the evolutionary lineage that led to people arose in Africa. Scientists said on Monday the creature, known as Graecopithecus freybergi and known only from a lower jawbone and an isolated tooth, may be the oldest-known member of the human lineage that began after an evolutionary split from the line that led to chimpanzees, our closest cousins. The jawbone, which included teeth, was unearthed in 1944 in Athens. The premolar was found in south-central Bulgaria in 2009. The researchers examined them using sophisticated new techniques including CT scans and established their age...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/22/17)
Countries in sub-Saharan Africa need to get their budgets in order, diversify their economies and look after their poorest people. If they do that, there is no reason why the region cannot have the strong growth needed to meet the aspirations of a young and growing population. That, at least, is the three-pillared prescription from the International Monetary Fund as expressed by one of its top Africa researchers, Celine Allard, in an official IMF blog post and podcast. Allard co-authored the Fund's regional economic outlook, released earlier this month. It found that sub-Saharan economic growth hit only 1.4 percent last year, the lowest level in two decades and well off the 5-6 percent rates normally reached. It was also well...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/20/17)
France will step up the fight against resurgent Islamist militants in north and west Africa and will work more closely with Germany to help the tinderbox region, President Emmanuel Macron said on his first trip outside Europe on Friday. Visiting Mali days after taking office, Macron vowed to keep French troops in the Sahel region until there was "no more Islamist terrorism" there. He said operations would be escalated in response to signs that militant groups were regrouping and uniting. "It is vital today that we speed up. Our armed forces are giving their all, but we must speed up" efforts to secure the Sahel, he told a news conference in Gao, Mali, where he held talks with President Ibrahim...

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