Sunday 22 October 2017
(Lesotho Times 07/25/13)
MASERU — Prime Minister Thomas Thabane on Tuesday described corruption as Lesotho’s worst public enemy after Aids. Thabane made the remarks while officially opening a three-day national dialogue on corruption organised by the anti-corruption watchdog, the Directorate of Corruption and Economic Offences (DCEO). The premier admitted that there was rampant corruption in Lesotho adding the practice was having a negative impact on the economy. He said if corruption is to be uprooted Lesotho’s economy would recover and be stable. He said that those stealing from the public purse were the worst thieves as they were holding back the country’s economic development. “Our ‘least developed country’ status is a result of corrupt practices. If we all put effort, corruption will be...
(This Day Live 07/25/13)
African countries and their communities have been told they can effectively end ‘land grabs,’ grow significantly more food across the region, and transform their development prospects if they can modernise the complex governance procedures that govern land ownership and management over the next decade. This was revealed in a new World Bank report titled Securing Africa’s Land for Shared Prosperity released on Monday in Washington, US, which also noted that Africa has the highest poverty rate in the world with 47.5 per cent of the population living below $1.25 a day. The detailed report noted that sub-Saharan Africa is home to nearly half of the world’s usable, uncultivated land but so far the continent has not been able to develop...
(Voice of America 07/25/13)
CAPITOL HILL — Prospective U.S. diplomats to Africa say President Barack Obama’s recent trip to the continent underscored persistent challenges and vast opportunities that cry out for robust and sustained American engagement. Administration nominees for the State Department’s top Africa post, as well as numerous ambassadorships, testified Wednesday at their Senate confirmation hearing. During his three-nation trip to Africa earlier this month, Obama unveiled initiatives to boost electric service on the continent, increase trade and commercial ties, and help groom Africa’s next generation of leaders. But more must be done, according to Democratic Senator Chris Coons, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on Africa. “President Obama’s recent trip was a positive demonstration of U.S. commitment, and the president’s initiatives...
(Voice of America 07/24/13)
Malaria infections, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa, are responsible for the deaths of some 200,000 newborns and 10,000 new mothers each year. The parasitic illness can also cause miscarriage and premature birth, increasing the risk of death. There are low cost, lifesaving interventions to prevent infection, yet, according to a new study, there are significant barriers to implementing them. For the past 20 years, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended that pregnant women in areas with high rates of malaria receive insecticide-treated bed nets and periodic doses of a cheap drug to prevent the disease. Yet, despite relatively high attendance at clinics for expectant mothers and their newborns throughout sub-Saharan Africa, statistics show that just a little over 21 percent...
(Ghana Business News 07/24/13)
It will cost Africa $4.5 billion over the next ten years in order to bring proper reforms into managing the continent’s ‘rich’ land, says a new World Bank report published July 22, 2013. According to the report, “Securing Africa’s Land for Shared Prosperity,” African countries could effectively end ‘land grabs,’ if the complex land ownership and management is mordernized through governance procedures. The World Bank therefore suggests a number of steps and policies that can bring major changes in the continent’s land governance. “It would cost African countries and their development partners, including the private sector, $4.5 billion spread over ten years to scale up these policy reforms and investments,” said the Bank. The report suggests that Africa could finally...
(AFP (eng) 07/23/13)
UN says although genital cutting is on decline, female genital mutilation remains "almost universal" in some countries. More than 125 million girls and women alive today have undergone female genital mutilation, and 30 million more girls are at risk in the next decade, UNICEF said. Although genital cutting is on the decline, the practice remains "almost universal" in some countries, said the report by the United Nations Children's Fund, released on Monday. The report compiles 20 years of data across 29 countries in Africa and the Middle East. The tradition involves removal of some or all of a female's external genitalia. It can include cutting out the clitoris and sometimes sewing together the labia. Laws are not enough to stop...
( 07/22/13)
South Africa has secured a deal with the World Food Programme to buy maize from the country's smallholder farmers as part of a R180-million South African humanitarian donation to Lesotho, which is in the throes of a food crisis. Following Lesotho's recent request for international assistance, South Africa responded by announcing a R180-million donation. "One of the conditions of this agreement from the South African government's side was that at least 40 percent of the white, non-GMO [genetically modified] maize must be purchased from smallholder farmers in South Africa," Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Tina Joemat-Pettersson said last week. Joemat-Pettersson said South Africa's aid would help provide up to 22 months of food security for 227 000 children and pregnant...
(Independent Online 07/22/13)
MASERU: Three South African judges were due to hear an unprecedented case in Lesotho on Monday. Lesotho Premier Thomas Thabane is being accused of seeking to “illegally” fire the president of the appeals court, Judge Michael Ramodibedi, over a long-running seniority row. Judges Suled Potterrill, of the Pretoria High Court, Dimpheletse Mashidi, from the Johannesburg High Court, and John Musi, from the Bloemfontein High Court, were sworn in two weeks ago as temporary judges in Lesotho to hear the explosive case pitting the prime minister against the top judge. The judges will decide whether Thabane acted unconstitutionally in asking the president of the Lesotho Court of Appeal, Judge Ramodibedi, to resign at a heated meeting the two held on April...
( 07/22/13)
African governments must improve their support for agricultural research organisations, Vice President Paa Kwesi Amissah-Arthur has said. “The need for action on agricultural research is urgent. African Governments must increase funding for agricultural research and extension; farmers’ innovations must find their way into the research agenda to enable Africa achieve its goal of food sufficiency,” Mr. Amissah-Arthur said in Accra at the opening ceremony of the 6th Africa Agriculture Science Week (AASW). AASW, hosted by the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA) in collaboration with the Government of Ghana, brought together over 1,300 scientific researchers, extension officers, farmers, policymakers, development partners, civil society and NGO groups from across the world to discuss the theme “Africa Feeding Africa through Agricultural...
(The Guardian Nigeria 07/21/13)
DESPITE the fall in productivity of Africa’s agriculture over the years occasioned by seasons of under-investment and an ill-advised structural adjustment, there is yet a lot to be done to feed the continent’s huge and fast-growing population. Global figures in agriculture and research agree, as they met in Accra, Ghana that ‘funding to agriculture, to universities and to research centres fell steadily and steeply,’ leading to a reversal of the many gains of the past. Dr. Kanayo Nwanze, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) President articulated as much when he addressed the Sixth Forum of Agriculture Research in Africa (FARA) summit in the Ghanaian capital during the week. He said, “Our universities lost good people. The quality of education declined,”...
(Reuters (Eng) 07/20/13)
(Reuters) - The African Union will form a new 3,600-strong peacekeeping mission for Central African Republic (CAR) to step up efforts to stabilize the fractious country, officials said on Friday. Admore Kambudzi, secretary of the AU's Peace and Security Council, said an existing regional peacekeeping mission known as MICOPAX would be rolled into the larger new force from August. He said its mandate would be to protect civilians and help stabilize the country and restore the central government in the former French colony, which is rich in gold and diamonds. Central African Republic, a nation of 4.5 million at the heart of the continent, has suffered decades of instability. Seleka rebels toppled the president in March, causing chaos and a...
(Mining Weekly 07/19/13)
JOHANNESBURG (miningweekly.com) – Aim-listed Firestone Diamonds on Tuesday announced a share placing to raise about $6-million (£3.97-million) before expenses, which would be used for, among others, working capital at the company's flagship Liqhobong diamond mine, in Lesotho. The group owns a 75% interest in Liqhobong, with the remaining interest held by the Lesotho government. The company had provisionally placed 198.5-million of its new ordinary shares through a placing through Mirabaud Securities and a direct subscription with institutional and other investors, including certain existing shareholders at a price of 2p a share. Firestone said the net proceeds of the placing would be used for capital expenditure (capex) at the main treatment plant (MTP) and general working capital and other purposes, including...
(Public Eye 07/18/13)
MASERU- The general change in the prices of common household commodities- known as annual rate of inflation- has decreased from 5.0 percent in April to 4.6 percent in May 2013. This is according to the latest Consumer Price Index (CPI) report released by the Bureau of Statistics. The main driver of the decrease, according to the monthly report, is the decrease in the price of liquid fuels which dropped by 9.8 percent. In comparison, the annual rate of inflation in South Africa for May was recorded at 5.6 percent, which is one percent higher than that of Lesotho. Annual inflation is calculated by comparing two sets of monthly consumer price indices of different years. The CPI is an indicator that...
(The Herald Online 07/18/13)
President Mugabe arrived here yesterday to attend King Letsie III's 50th birthday celebrations scheduled for Setsoto Stadium today. The President was received at Moshoeshoe International Airport by Zimbabwean Ambassador to South Africa Phelekezela Mphoko, who also covers Lesotho, and Lesotho Development Planning Minister Dr Moeketsi Majoro. Several regional leaders among them President Hifikepunye Pohamba of Namibia, President Ian Khama of Botswana and King Mswati III of Swaziland are also expected to attend the function together with South African President Jacob Zuma. Zambia President Michael Sata would be represented by his deputy Mr Guy Scott. President Mugabe is being accompanied by Foreign Affairs Minister Simbarashe Mumbengegwi and other senior Government officials. He was seen off at the Harare International Airport yesterday...
(Public Eye 07/18/13)
MASERU- The possible non-renewal of the African Growth Opportunity Act (AGOA), a duty-free export arrangement into the United States, should not be seen as the end of the local textile and garment industry. This is according to the Chief Executive Officer of Lesotho National Development Corporation, Mr Joshua Setipa, who said the expiry does not mean Lesotho would stop exporting to the United States, but merely narrow their exporting prospects. The AGOA, introduced by the United States in 2000 to assist the economies of sub-Saharan Africa by allowing all their marketable goods produced in AGOA-eligible countries to enter the US market duty-free, is set for review in 2015. Mr Setipa believes Lesotho should be more worried about positioning itself as...
(The Globe and Mail 07/17/13)
On the noisy, bustling floor of the CGM garment factory, a supervisor is annoyed. One of his workers is complaining that her protective mask has worn out and she can’t get a replacement until next month. The supervisor refuses her one. “There’s a budget for masks,” he snaps to a visiting reporter. “We provide one every month. We can’t provide one every two or three days for no good reason.” It is a candid admission of the tradeoff between profit and health in Lesotho’s garment industry – the biggest African exporter of clothing to North America, selling jeans and shirts to companies such as Wal-Mart and Levi Strauss. The same tension exists in other countries such as China, Cambodia and,...
( 07/17/13)
Africa’s oil and gas industry is poised for momentous growth despite its grappling with severe stresses of a challenging economic and political environment on the continent, fuelled by poor physical infrastructure, corruption, an uncertain regulatory framework, and a lack of skills, according to a review issued by PwC. PwC’s ‘Africa oil and gas review’ of developments in the African oil and gas industry is the third in a series of reviews of the sector by the tax, assurance and advisory solutions firm. Uyi Akpata, PwC Africa oil and gas industry leader/deputy country senior partner, Nigeria, says: “The challenges facing oil and gas companies operating in Africa are diverse and numerous. Political interference, uncertainty and delays in passing laws, energy policies...
(Angola Press 07/16/13)
Luanda – The Foreign Affairs Minister, Georges Rebelo Pinto Chikoti, is travelling this Tuesday to the kingdom of Lesotho, to participate in the festivities of the King Letsie III’s anniversary, to take place on Wednesday 17 July. According to a press note from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MIREX) that reached Angop on Monday, the minister will represent the Angolan President, José Eduardo dos Santos, in the referred festivities in the city of Maseru. The document also states that on Thursday, the Angolan official will attend the 18th ordinary meeting of CPLP Council of Ministers, to happen in the Mozambican capital city of Maputo on 17-18 July. Among various themes, Georges Chikoti will discuss issues related to the prevailing political...
(AL Jazeera 07/16/13)
Executive council meets in Nigerian capital to review progress made in combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. The African Union executive council is meeting in the Nigerian capital to take stock of progress made in the fight against HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. The conference, which opened in Abuja on Friday, will also address challenges encountered in the campaign against the three diseases. "It is timely that we review the implementation of the various declarations and plans of action adopted in the course of the last decade," Ethiopia's Foreign Minister Tedros Ghebreyesus told the conference, according to the African Union's website. Ghebreyesus said Ethiopia was proposing to establish an "African Centre for Diseases Control and Prevention (African–CDC) or Health Commission for Africa...
(Public Eye 07/15/13)
MASERU- The Lesotho Revenue Authority (LRA) has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Swaziland Revenue Authority (SRA) for mutual capacity building of both authorities. The agreement, signed in Maseru on Friday last week, will enable the two tax authorities to collaborate by, among others, sharing ideas on new developments and best practices, exchanging information on general matters of revenue administration and enforcement, and exchanging of experts and operational personnel on a short-term basis when necessary. The actual work plan on what areas of cooperation the two authorities will work on, are however, to be developed by an implementation committee comprising officials from the two countries. Speaking at the signing ceremony, the SRA Commissioner General Mr Dumisani Masilela said the...

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