Monday 24 July 2017
(Libya Herald 07/03/13)
The Ministry of the Interior complex on Tripoli’s Airport Road was surrounded by a group of several hundred heavily-armed men early this evening. It is reported that when the gunmen arrived, firing heavily into the air, guards in the complex withdrew. There were no staff in the building at the time. The two main entrances were believed to have been blockaded with sand and the Airport Road was closed. A source at the ministry, speaking on condition of anonymity, told the Libya Herald that the identity of the gunmen was unclear, as were their demands. It had been variously reported that they were calling for interior minister Mohamed Al-Sheikh to be removed, because he was not strong enough to lead...
(Libya Herald 07/03/13)
In what appears to have been a coordinated attack, two separate security patrols in Benghazi were tonight targeted by a suspected car-bomb and a gelatina. A car-bomb in a BMW was detonated at a checkpoint manned by members of Benghazi’s Joint Security Force in Ashreen Street, spokesman for the Benghazi Joint Security Room, Mohammed Hejazi, told the Libya Herald. Four members of the patrol were injured, one of whom is in intensive care. The other three sustained minor injuries. One local resident who heard the blast said it was so powerful he thought it had been an RPG attack. The second incident occurred on Dubai Street, where an explosive device – believed to be a gelatina – was hurled at...
(The Associated Press 07/03/13)
TRIPOLI (Reuters) - The young woman introduced as "The Revolutionary" was breaking a taboo in Libya by speaking out about how she and other women had been raped by Muammar Gaddafi's men in the early months of the country's uprising. "They arrested me publicly at Nasser University," she said, recalling how guards in Tripoli came for her and two other young women who expressed support for the revolution that led to Gaddafi's overthrow. "They told me, 'We are only going to take you away for questioning, and then we will bring you back'." Instead, the young woman said, a local official told the men: "Take these girls to Mutassim and enjoy them tonight." Mutassim was one of Gaddafi's sons and...
(Ventures-Africa 07/03/13)
VENTURES AFRICA – The African Development Bank (AfDB) on Tuesday said it has earmarked up to $3 billion for Africa’s power sector over the next 5 years. AfDB President, Donald Kaberuka, speaking from Dar Es Salaam, said the bank’s interventions will include investment loans, reforms, advisory and guarantees in the energy sector. This is part of the bank’s backing for President Barack Obama’s $7 billion Power Africa plan which Obama unveiled on Saturday in Cape Town, South Africa. The US-led power plan will pay more attention to advancing more access to power in Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria and Tanzania. Blue chip companies including General Electric and Symbion Power will also invest an additional $9 billion. Kaberuka said AfDB will...
(Libya Herald 07/02/13)
Rumours that an armed group tried to smuggle Qaddafi spy chief Abdullah Senussi out of Tripoli’s Hathba jail have been denied by prison staff. “These reports are totally incorrect and all the prisoners are still in the jail,” head of Hathba Prison media office Musbah Al-Thani told the Libya Herald today. He denied that an armed group had tried to smuggle Senussi from the prison. Speculation that Senussi and other senior Qaddafi-era officials tried to escape spread across social networks and local TV stations, following the bloody clashes that took place a week ago at Al-Yarmouk Brigade’s camp in the capital’s Salah Idden district. Al-Thani said that a state of emergency had been declared at the prison in light of...
(Libya Herald 07/02/13)
Mystery this morning surrounded the whereabouts of Prime Minister Ali Zeidan, who did not attend a Moscow oil and gas conference as scheduled yesterday. Diplomatic sources suggest that instead of going to Russia, the prime minister wound up a trip to Germany and returned directly to Tripoli. Calls to his office overnight and this morning have gone unanswered. There is speculation that Zeidan abandoned his Moscow trip because of rising concerns at the security situation in the capital. Last Thursday he set a five-day deadline for the evacuation of the Yarmouk Camp by Zintani militiamen, involved in two days of fighting in Abu Selim and Salah Idden. That deadline expires today. It has also been suggested that Zeidan was concerned...
( 07/02/13)
Doctors in Libya say they are seeing a “growing” number of patients with drug problems and a corresponding risk of HIV infection, in a post-Gaddafi era marked by limited law enforcement and government capacity. “Every month more people come to us needing help,” said Abdullah Fannir, deputy director of Gargaresh psychiatric hospital in Tripoli. “It’s part of the fallout from the revolution. Border control is weak, making it easy for drug-traffickers, and there’s more demand as well. Hundreds of thousands of Libyans were displaced, wounded or bereaved during the uprising.” Doctors at Benghazi’s Al Irada drug addiction clinic, the only treatment centre of its kind in the country, say some of the most common addictions they have to treat are...
(Libya Herald 07/02/13)
Ghariyan Revolutionaries today handed over formal control of the city’s Khalifa Al Tekbai camp to the army in a ceremony attended by the new president of the GNC Nuri Abu Sahmain. The occupants of the camp are not moving out, but will now come under Tripoli military Area Command and are now enrolled in the army. However agreement on the change was only reached after the unit’s commanders agreed that the Political Isolation Law will be applied to every member of the unit. Those who fall foul of its provisions will be removed from their positions. The Tripoli commander, Hussein Ramadan welcomed the unit into the regular army, watched by interior minister Mohamed Al-Sheikh. By Ashraf Abdul Wahab.
(Reuters (Eng) 07/02/13)
New protests have shut down several Libyan oilfields, cutting output by around a third, industry sources said, as Libya struggles to maintain stability in an industry vital to the economy and state revenue. Workers calling for management change shut down production at several fields belonging to Zueitina Oil Company on Monday, while a separate security dispute closed the Sharara field. "We are demanding a change in management," an engineer working at the Zueitina terminal said, adding that the demands are related to a dispute over work conditions. "The protest started at the 103 D field then spread to 103 A and Zala oilfields, and now the port has been affected too," he said. "Yesterday the oil minister went to one...
(Voice of America 07/02/13)
President Obama is on the last leg of his three-nation tour of Africa, aimed at promoting U.S. trade with the continent. As Washington turns a fresh eye toward a continent that Obama describes as about to “take off," U.S. government officials and investors alike will find that geopolitical rival China has already made huge strides there. China’s footprint in Africa is huge. The 20-story African Union tower (in Addis Ababa, the capital city of Ethiopia) which Beijing donated to the continental group is a testament to the size of Beijing’s ambition. “Every country, as it achieves global greatness, seeks to leave behind major landmarks that become evidence of its ascendance into global power," said Wole Soboyejo. Winston Wole Soboyejo spoke...
(Libya Herald 07/01/13)
Some 650 refugees have refused to leave the Choucha refugee camp at the Tunisian-Libyan border, which officially closed today. The United Nations refugee agency UNHCR announced the closure of the camp in March but many refugees have stayed on, despite water and electricity supplies being cut off. A Chadian resident, Mussa Ibrahim, confirmed that the camp is still open and continuing to house around 650 residents. “The camp may be closed theoretically,” he said: “UNHCR said they closed it for administrative reasons, but they did it for media hype.” He also told the Libya Herald that basic services have been reduced over the last week. The water, he said, was stopped today, forcing refugees to fetch water from neighbouring areas...
(Libya Herald 07/01/13)
An Arab League delegation has been in Tripoli talking with Foreign Minister Mohamed Abdulaziz about Libya’s security situation. Government sources said that the League delegation, headed by Deputy Secretary-General Ahmed Ben Halli also looked at how the organisation could help with the elections for the 60 Committee, which will frame the new constitution, in the same way that they assisted with the vote for the GNC, a year ago next week. On the security issue, Abdulaziz explained that Libya was still in a transitional period from revolution to a state with institutions and the rule of law. Over and above security, the meeting focussed on the building of an effective criminal justice system, with courts and prisons meeting international standards...
(Libya Herald 07/01/13)
After returning from the G8 Summit at Lough Erne, Northern Ireland, Prime Minister Ali Zeidan, announced that he would travel to Russia to meet President Vladimir Putin. The Moscow encounter coincides with today’s opening of the Gas Exporting Countries Forum (GECF) Summit, of which Libya is a member. Zeidan had said during a press conference on 20 June, he would also be travelling to Italy and some African nations, to “sort foreign relations”. On Russia, he noted that the two countries had an important relationship, which spanned for over fifty years. Perhaps feeling the need to justify his upcoming trip to Moscow, Zeidan stated “ We are allies with the West, they helped us in the liberation war”. To maintain...
(Fox News 07/01/13)
CHOUCHA, Tunisia (AFP) – Several hundred people who had fled the 2011 Libya conflict refused Sunday to leave the Choucha refugee camp in southern Tunisia, which was due to be shut, blocking attempts to dismantle their tents, an AFP journalist reported. The UN's refugee agency UNHCR said in March that it would close the camp on Sunday. Choucha opened in early 2011 to shelter those fleeing the conflict that toppled Libya's former dictator Moamer Kadhafi. Water and electricity supplies to the camp have been cut, but its remaining residents, mostly sub-Saharan Africans, are blocking any attempts to take their tents down, the AFP journalist reported. Mohammed Taher, a 33-year-old Sudanese resident of the camp, said he was determined to stay...
(Voice of America 07/01/13)
CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA — U.S. President Barack Obama has outlined a new model for U.S. engagement with Africa, supporting greater economic opportunity and democracy, and African-led solutions to security. At the University of Cape Town, Mr. Obama presented a broad picture of his goals for U.S.-Africa policy, including assistance, trade and investment, health, and security cooperation. The speech was framed around the legacy Obama said former president Nelson Mandela has left for the continent. The most frequently used words and phrases in President Obama's speech in Cape Town on June 30, 2013. Courtesy of wordle.netThe most frequently used words and phrases in President Obama's speech in Cape Town on June 30, 2013. Courtesy of wordle.net. ​Earlier he and his...
(The Associated Press 06/30/13)
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — President Barack Obama on Sunday will announce a new initiative to double access to electric power in sub-Saharan Africa, part of his effort to build on the legacy of equality and opportunity forged by his personal hero, Nelson Mandela. Obama, who flew from Johannesburg to Cape Town Sunday, will pay tribute to the ailing 94-year-old Mandela throughout the day. The president and his family will visit Robben Island, where the anti-apartheid leader spent 18 years confined to a tiny cell, including a stop of the lime quarry where Mandela toiled and developed the lung problems that are ailing him today. The White House said Obama's guide during his tour of the island will be...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/29/13)
U.S. President Barack Obama paid tribute to anti-apartheid hero Nelson Mandela as he flew to South Africa on Friday but played down expectations of a meeting with the ailing black leader during an Africa tour promoting democracy and food security. White House officials hope Obama's three-nation tour of Africa - his first substantial visit to the continent since taking office in 2009 - will compensate for what some view as years of neglect by America's first black president. The health of Mandela, the 94-year-old former South African president clinging to life in a Pretoria hospital, dominated Obama's day even before he arrived in Johannesburg. "I don't need a photo op," Obama told reporters aboard Air Force One after leaving Senegal...
(AFP (eng) 06/29/13)
PRETORIA, June 29, 2013 (AFP) - US President Barack Obama will not visit his political hero Nelson Mandela in hospital, out of deference for the anti-apartheid icon's "peace and comfort," a US official said Saturday. Obama and his wife Michelle will however spend time with Mandela's family to comfort them in a difficult time, the official said, as the US leader arrived in Pretoria for talks with President Jacob Zuma. "The President and First Lady will meet privately with members of the Mandela family to offer their thoughts and prayers at this difficult time," the official said on condition of anonymity. "Out of deference to Nelson Mandela's peace and comfort and the family's wishes, they will not be visiting the...
(Libya Herald 06/28/13)
Defence Minister Mohammed Barghathi, was today relieved of his duties by Prime Minister Ali Zeidan. Barghathi’s departure comes after widespread dissatisfaction with his responses to the rising tide of violence and killings that has hit Benghazi, Sebha and now Tripoli. The Prime Minister confirmed his decision during an interview this afternoon on Libya Alwataneya TV. Zeidan also rounded on the acting Chief of Staff, Salem Gnaidi, for comments he made yesterday, that the army had been unable the intervene decisively in this week’s Tripoli clashes, as it did not have the means, because the government had given it insufficient funds. This statement, said Zeidan, was political and inappropriate. He added: “Almost LD 7 billion were given to the Chief of...
(The Economist 06/28/13)
Muammar Qaddafi’s hometown band of loyalists flaunt his favourite colour. AS THE government struggles to assert its authority over a plethora of ethnic, tribal and party militias, some of them Islamist, others secular, a growing number of Libyans may be starting to regret the revolution. Rigorous opinion polls are few and patchy, but the best clue to people’s allegiances may be the colour of shopkeepers’ doors and windows. In Libyan markets during Muammar Qaddafi’s era they all had to be painted green in honour of the Green Book, a personal rendition of wisdom that the colonel hoped would achieve the stature of Chairman Mao’s red one. Some shopkeepers, parading their loyalty to the new order, have painted their shutters the...

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