Sunday 17 December 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 09/18/13)
(Reuters) - Libya's prime minister on Tuesday appealed to the outside world to help restore security, as it combats political chaos and tries to restart oil exports crippled by protesters at a cost of $130 million a day in lost income. Ali Zeidan met with his British counterpart David Cameron, who two years ago was a driving force behind a Western military campaign that helped topple Muammar Gaddafi and aimed to encourage a stable democracy in Libya. That has yet to emerge. A combination of strikes, militias and political activists have blocked the majority of Libya's oilfields and ports since end July but the government's fledging army and police force are ill-equipped to deal with armed protesters. "If the international...
(The Wall Street Journal 09/18/13)
Deteriorating security situation shut down two third of the country's oil production this summer. Shut down oil production in Libya will soon resume, but Libya's internal security situation won't improve unless it receives technical support from the international community, the country's prime minister said Tuesday. In a rare public appearance in Europe, Ali Zeidan said Libya was setting up 10 training camps and had sought help from Germany, the U.S. and France. But he said Libya needed additional foreign assistance to train the country's fledgling security forces and to collect weapons and ammunition that were lost following the civil war that toppled strongman Moammar Gadhafi two years ago. "The situation is not going to improve unless we get practical assistance...
(Bloomberg 09/18/13)
Libya may offer areas containing natural gas in an auction of energy-exploration rights it plans next year as it seeks to boost production of the fuel amid rising electricity use, National Oil Corp. executives said. “It is possible that the bidding round could include gas,” Mansour Emtir, petrochemical and gas superintendent of the state-run NOC, said in an interview today at a conference in Tripoli. “We need more gas for our power plants and for petrochemical projects” that burn the fuel as feedstock. Libya’s gas reserves are “largely unexploited and unexplored,” NOC Gas Committee Chairman Jamal Hawisa told the conference. The North African country may contain 100 trillion cubic feet of gas, almost double its 54 trillion cubic feet in...
( 09/18/13)
Tripoli — Lifts that pause between floors and the sound of keys locking doors never fail to make Ali Elakermi's heart race. Spending 30 years as a political prisoner in Libya's notorious Abu Salim jail has left him with a fear of enclosed spaces. There are plenty of physical scars, too. Elakermi was beaten and tortured following his arrest for being a member of an Islamic political party in 1973, at age 22, during a purge of intellectuals, Islamists and others by then-leader Muammar Gaddafi. He was cut with razor blades, and his wounds were rubbed with salt by his captors. Elakermi and other inmates in the Tripoli jail were forced to listen for hours to recordings of Gaddafi's speeches...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/18/13)
LONDON | (Reuters) - Libya aims to list one of its two state-owned mobile phone operators next year, the head of the North African country's telecoms operator said on Tuesday, as it seeks to open up a sector long isolated from foreign investment. Government-controlled Libyan Post, Telecommunication and Information Technology Co (LPTIC) owns the country's two mobile operators Al Madar and Libyana as well as Libya's main Internet provider, with the telecoms sector cut off from foreign competition during Muammar Gaddafi's 42-year rule. Libyana, which has annual revenue in excess of $1 billion, could make its debut on the Tripoli stock exchange in the second quarter of 2014. It has about a 70 percent market share. "This is a company...
(The Wall Street Journal 09/18/13)
When residents sang and danced in this town's dusty streets in August to celebrate the self-declared birth of their new nation, Zambia's police pounced. On Tuesday, 59 people arrested in the sweep appeared at a court in Mongu, located on the marshy banks of the Zambezi River, charged with treason. Many were picked up in the past few weeks for their alleged involvement in a ceremony to select a new regional administrator who would organize elections for a newly independent government. It was the latest sign of separatism taking hold in Africa—both peacefully and violently. Some of the jailed activists now call themselves citizens of Barotseland, a kingdom that before Zambia's independence in 1964 was a British protectorate. When the...
( 09/18/13)
(IRIN) - This year, the two most powerful men on the globe, presidents Barack Obama and Xi Jinping, both embarked on Africa tours, pledging to increase aid and investment and work with the continent to improve development. While this was Barack Obama's first extended tour of Africa since taking office (he made a one-day stop in 2009 in Ghana), Chinese leaders have been visiting the continent regularly for decades, quietly working on joint development, trade, foreign direct investment and assistance projects. "China is the largest developing country in the world, and Africa is the continent with the largest number of developing countries," Jiang Zemin, then-president of China, said in his opening remarks at the first Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC)...
(The Globe and Mail 09/17/13)
Libya took the first steps toward restarting some of its oil output on Monday as the government said a tentative deal with protesters in the country’s west allowed pumping to resume from a major field. Hopes of a full output resumption from the OPEC producer remained slim after an attempt at a similar deal with protesters in the east collapsed, meaning two-thirds of the country’s output would remain shut for the time being. The government has been locked in talks with feuding tribes, militia and protester groups over the past two months as output collapsed to a tenth of Libya’s maximum capacity of 1.5 million barrels per day. The worst disruption since the 2011 revolution has already cost Libya and...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/17/13)
LONDON | Tue Sep 17, 2013 (Reuters) - Libya is losing some $130 million a day due to protests that have crippled the North African's oil sector, Prime Minister Ali Zeidan said on Tuesday and insisted he still wanted to solve the crisis through dialogue rather than force. "We are going to work on solving this problem," Zeidan told an investment conference in London. "When blood is shed, the loss will be greater". The crisis has caused oil output to slump to around 250,000 barrels per day (bpd) from pre-war output of 1.6 million bpd. Zeidan confirmed output was resuming at the El Sharara and El Feel oilfields in southwestern Libya and that the Marsa al-Brega port had started to export again.
(Bloomberg 09/17/13)
Libya is reviewing the terms it offers foreign companies to explore for and produce oil as the OPEC member seeks more partners to boost output, said Nuri Berruien, chairman of the state-owned National Oil Corp. “The conditions are under review so as to improve relations with the companies in a win-win context and promote long-term investments,” he said today at a conference in Tripoli. Libya plans to hold its next bidding round for exploration rights in mid-2014, Berruien said. The auction would be the North African country’s first since the ouster of former leader Muammar Qaddafi in 2011. Eni SpA (ENI), Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDSA), Exxon Mobil Corp. (XOM), Repsol SA (REP), Total SA (FP) and OAO Gazprom (OGZD)...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/17/13)
LONDON, Sept 17 (Reuters) - ExxonMobil, the world's largest publicly-traded energy company, said on Tuesday it would cut back its staff and operations in Libya as growing instability no longer justified a major presence. While it is not a major investor in Libya's oil and gas sector, Exxon's move highlights growing concern among international oil companies that the returns on offer in Libya may not justify the security and political risks that have grown since the 2011 uprisings that swept the Middle East. "The security and business situation means we can no longer justify maintaining a large office presence in Libya," ExxonMobil spokesman Patrick McGinn told Reuters. "We are not giving up on seeking to develop a business in Libya...
(Libya Herald 09/17/13)
As strikers permit the resumption of work at oil fields and export terminals Libya oil production, already back to 243,000 barrels a day will have risen to 700,000 b/d by Friday, a senior NOC executive said today in London. Speaking on the sidelines of the FDI Libya conference Mustafa Sanalla, an executive board member of the NOC board said that production was now flowing from Al-Sharara and El-Fil (Elephant) fields. “I believe that it will be to 700,000 barrels by Friday” he said and put in a call to his Tripoli office to confirm that figures. He said that Force Majeure had been partially lifted on export contracts and export terminals were now working. Earlier in the day when Prime...
(Foreign Policy 09/17/13)
Deepening political polarization in Libya is hindering the country's democratic transition as different political factions struggle for power and control over the country's fledging institutions. Over the past two weeks, political tensions between Prime Minister Ali Zeidan and the Muslim Brotherhood in Libya have intensified due to Zeidan's visit to Egypt on Sept. 5. Zeidan held talks with the military-backed government and met with the head of the Egyptian Army, Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The timing of the visit was sensitive considering the recent military overthrow of Muslim Brotherhood President Mohamed Morsy and his government. The Justice and Construction Party (the Muslim Brotherhood's political wing in Libya) was quick to condemn the prime minister's visit to Egypt and his talks...
(Libya Herald 09/17/13)
Libya faces terrorists who do not want the country to improve, Prime Minister Ali Zeidan told a London investment conference this morning, before going on to meet British premier David Cameron. “This terrorism has come from other countries” said Zeidan, “and now it is trying to find a stronghold in Libya.” He appealed for international help to rebuild the army and the police force. He added, “I say frankly that if the international community does not help us collect arms and ammunition, then the return of security is going to take a long time. The government can only do so much”. Nevertheless Zeidan was upbeat about security. He told an audience of Libyan and British businessmen at the FDI Libya...
(The Guardian 09/17/13)
Safe and Inclusive Cities initiative will compare existing approaches as part of drive to tackle urban conflict. Urban violence in 40 cities in sub-Saharan Africa, south Asia, and Latin America will be investigated as part of an ambitious Canadian-British funded research project. The initiative will seek to understand the complex causes of urban violence and find practical solutions. The $11m (£6.7m) Safe and Inclusive Cities initiative, funded by Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and Britain's Department for International Development (DfID), will provide 15 research teams with grants of up to $500,000 each. "Top experts from around the world will analyse the effectiveness of violence prevention strategies and identify successful concrete examples," said John de Boer, a programme leader at...
(Libya Herald 09/16/13)
At least two people, possibly three, are reported to have been killed and others wounded in clashes in Sebha between two army battalions in the town representing rival tribes. According to the local Germa news agency, negotiations are now underway to try and end the fighting. The clashes which took place between Sebha’s historic fort and the airport started on Saturday evening between a local Libya Shield unit and members of the Baha-Uddin battalion. Two of the dead were taken to Sebha medical centre as were the two of the injured. They are said to be in a stable condition. The fighting is reported to be over control of military premises near the fort. However, there is strong tribal element...
(Washington Post 09/16/13)
When Moammar Gaddafi renounced chemical weapons in 2003, the Libyan dictator surprised skeptics by moving quickly to eliminate his country’s toxic arsenal. He signed international treaties, built a disposal facility and allowed inspectors to oversee the destruction of tons of mustard gas. But Gaddafi’s public break with weapons of mass destruction was not all that it seemed. Only after his death in 2011 did investigators learn that he had retained a large stash of chemical weapons. In a hillside bunker deep in Libya’s southeastern desert, Gaddafi had tucked away hundreds of battle-ready warheads loaded with deadly sulfur mustard. The story of Gaddafi’s deception now looms over nascent efforts to devise a plan for destroying the chemical arsenal of Syrian President...
(AFP (eng) 09/16/13)
RIPOLI, September 16, 2013 (AFP) - Libya will launch a tender in 2014 for the award of the country's first private mobile phone licence, Communications Minister Usama Siala told AFP on Monday. The country's two publicly-owned providers have more than eight million subscribers, one of the highest penetration rates in Africa, but Libya has no private mobile telecoms operators. "We are going to propose a mobile telephone licence for the private sector in three to six months," Siala said in an interview with AFP. "The ministry got the green light from the cabinet, from the prime minister and from the telecommunications committee of the General National Congress," the country's highest political authority, Siala said. "We in the ministry would prefer...
(The New York Times 09/16/13)
Two years after local militias overthrew the Libyan dictator Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, many of those same fighters have brought Libya’s critical oil industry to a halt, as a challenge to the latest in a series of that country’s interim governments. World Twitter Logo. Protests and strikes at several large export terminals and oil fields have throttled Libya’s daily oil production to one-tenth its capacity in recent days, jeopardizing the national economy and tightening world oil supplies at a time when unrest is spreading in the Middle East. Prime Minister Ali Zeidan announced Wednesday that his government had issued arrest warrants for the strike leaders, setting up a potentially critical showdown. “I won’t let anyone hold Libya and its resources hostage...
(Libya Herald 09/16/13)
Children and youth in Benghazi have been clearing rubble at the Foreign Ministry building following the car bomb blast on 11 September. The initiative lead by the “For you Benghazi, I take the initiative” civil society organisation, aims to remove debris and clean the surrounding area hit by the terror attack. New plants are being planted and palm trees burnt by the force of the blast, have been trimmed. Imam Al-Riyani, head of the the organisation’s press office, told the Libyan News Agency LANA, that work had been made possible by many volunteers, and with equipment and help from the civil works authority in the city. This is not the first time “For you Benghazi, I take the initiative” has...

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