Monday 24 July 2017
(Global post 06/10/13)
After 31 deaths this weekend further proved Libya isn’t moving fast enough to establish a national security force, General Yusef al-Mangoush announced he was quitting as chief of the military. The General National Congress accepted his resignation on Sunday, BBC reported. The violence happened Saturday in Benghazi outside a “Shield of Libya” compound. Demonstrators surrounded the militia base and said they wanted militias disbanded and government forces to take control. A similar demonstration elsewhere in Libya on Saturday ended without violence. The gunmen opened fire and threw explosives at the buildings, and Shield of Libya returned fire. It’s unclear what or who initiated the battle. To gain order, the GNC established a strict timeline for creating a national security force,...
(Bloomberg 06/10/13)
The United Nations mission to Libya called for “maximum restraint” from all parties following the death of 31 people in clashes with a militia in the eastern city of Benghazi over the weekend. In a statement yesterday, the United Nations Support Mission in Libya reiterated “the necessity of resolving disagreements peacefully through dialogue.” Clashes between the Libya Shield brigade and protesters in Benghazi on June 8 left 31 dead and at least 120 wounded, the state-run LANA news agency reported, more than doubling an earlier fatality count. The violence erupted after demonstrators demanding that the power of militias be curbed reached the gates of the brigade, LANA said. The news agency had earlier reported that 11 people had been killed...
(BBC News Africa 06/10/13)
At least 25 people have died in Benghazi in eastern Libya, in clashes that erupted during protests outside a militia headquarters. Dozens more were wounded in the violence, medical officials say. Demonstrators had gathered outside the headquarters of the Libya Shield Brigade demanding the disbanding of militias, residents say. Since Col Gaddafi's death in 2011, the government has been trying to tackle the presence of armed militias. The Libya Shield Brigade, which played a role in the ousting of Muammar Gaddafi, has so far refused to lay down its weapons. The militia say they are operating with defence ministry approval. 'Reserve force'. One witness said he had seen around 200 protesters from an area to the east of Benghazi. While...
(Voice of America 06/10/13)
Decades of drought in central Africa may have had a surprising cause, according to new research that challenges the notion that the severe dry weather was triggered mainly by bad agricultural practices and overgrazing. The research, done at the University of Washington, shows that the drought was at least partially caused by pollution in the Northern Hemisphere. The researchers said that sulfate-laden aerosols coming from coal-burning factories from the 1960s through the 1980s actually slowed warming in the Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern Hemisphere. This shifted tropical rain bands south, away from the Sahel region, and led ultimately to the near drying up of Lake Chad, which is used to water crops in surrounding areas. Africa's Sahel regionAfrica's Sahel...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/09/13)
(Reuters) - South Africans prayed for Nelson Mandela's recovery on Sunday as the 94-year-old former president spent a second day in hospital with a recurring lung infection. Mandela, who became a global symbol of triumph over adversity and South Africa's first black leader in 1994 after the defeat of apartheid, was hospitalized early on Saturday after his already frail health worsened. It is his fourth hospital stay since December and the government said on Saturday his condition was "serious". During previous hospital visits it had highlighted his "good spirits". His health is a cause for concern to the millions of South Africans who revere Mandela for his decades of struggle against white-minority rule and steering the continent's biggest economy to...
(BBC News Africa 06/08/13)
Nelson Mandela has been admitted to hospital with a lung infection. The former South African president is in a "serious but stable condition", a spokesman for the current President, Jacob Zuma, says. Mr Mandela, 94, has been ill for some days but deteriorated overnight and was transferred to a hospital in Pretoria. Mr Mandela led the fight against apartheid, became South Africa's first black president, and is widely regarded as father of the nation. He has recently suffered a series of health problems and this is his fifth visit to hospital in two years. In April he was released from hospital after a 10-day stay caused by pneumonia. His illness was described on Saturday as a recurrence of a lung...
(Voice of America 06/08/13)
BEIRUT — Growing lawlessness in southern Libya and an influx of Islamist militants from Mali are stoking worries that Libya’s security weaknesses are fast becoming a destabilizing factor in the region. A former Libyan intelligence source has told VOA that al-Qaida-linked jihadists driven out of Mali by a French-led offensive earlier this year have set up at least three jihadist camps in southern Libya in recent months. As a consequence, the source said, Libya has now become the headquarters for al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb. The situation has triggered criticism from neighboring sub-Saharan nations and has caused Libya to appeal for technical assistance from Europe to help police the nation’s long borders. Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan reacted angrily to...
(Libya Herald 06/07/13)
Speaking on Tuesday at the second day of the MEED “Libya Projects 2013” conference in Tripoli, Mahmoud Ajaj, Chairman of the Housing and Infrastructure Board (HIB), said that whilst HIB could have between 15-50 bn’s worth of projects, ODAC could also have up to LD 45 bn and the Real Estate Investment Bank could have up to LD 12 bn of projects. This could total up to LD 119 bn worth of projects. Moreover, the HIB head added that with infrastructure and utilities as well as the need to upgrade services such as internet, he expected that in reality the total value of Libya’s projects would double over the next few years. If Ajaj’s assessment is valid, this could bring...
(The Wall Street Journal 06/07/13)
PARIS—A volatile Libya is posing a growing threat to stability in the Sahara region as Islamist militants who once controlled northern Mali have succeeded in resettling in remote parts of the Libyan desert, Chad President Idriss Déby said Thursday. Mr. Déby said Western powers and their allies must recognize that the 2011 military intervention that helped rebel groups topple Libyan strongman Col. Moammar Gadhafi has failed to pave the way for a united and peaceful Libya. "The international community has an obligation to intervene," Mr. Déby said in an interview in Paris. "We must help the Libyan government forge national reconciliation." Mr. Déby said the duty to help his northern neighbor rests with the United Nations because the U.N. Security...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/07/13)
LONDON — Case numbers in Africa's meningitis season this year were the lowest in 10 years thanks to a cheap new vaccine designed to treat a type of the disease common in the so-called meningitis belt, the World Health Organization said on Thursday. The vaccine, called MenAfriVac, was developed with funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation specifically for use against meningitis A, a type which causes regular epidemics in Africa. Detailing data for Jan. 1 to May 12, the United Nations health agency said that just under 9,250 meningitis cases, including 857 deaths, were reported in 18 of the 19 African countries under enhanced surveillance for meningitis. Epidemics of meningitis A occur regularly in Africa's “meningitis belt”, a...
(Libya Herald 06/07/13)
A new allowance is to be paid to all families with children up to 18 years of age. The figure has not been disclosed but the first payment will be before the end of the month, or at the latest before Ramadan and the second in October. The announcement of the new family support was made by the Social Affairs Minister, Kamla Al-Mazini, at a press conference today that following a resolution issued by her ministry. A committee has been formed at the ministry to run the process of giving the allowances in cooperation with the Civil Status Authority. Estimates have been given by the committee, based on the 2006 census, that under the age of 18 there are around...
(Libya Herald 06/06/13)
The Prime Minister launched a powerful appeal today to the Libyan public not to be so quick to criticise his government. He called on people to understand the scale of the challenges it faced. “This government came to power for reasons of national duty, not political wrestling or personal ambition,” he said his weekly press conference. “We took up office in exceptional circumstances. So when we are assessed, those who asses us should take this into consideration,” he stated. People had seen all the various acts of civil disobedience, the strikes, and so forth, he said. ”We also inherited a heavy legacy”, he added, referring to wages, institutional weakness and with many civil servants failing to turn up to work...
(The Associated Press 06/06/13)
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Libya brought Susan Rice her biggest success and, ultimately, caused her greatest professional disappointment. Rice, who was appointed national security adviser Wednesday by President Barack Obama, has been a bold and blunt U.S. ambassador at the United Nations, successfully pushing for tougher sanctions against Iran and North Korea and for international intervention in Libya. But her accomplishments were overshadowed by her role in the administration's bungled account of the terrorist attack in Libya that killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador. Rice became the face of the Benghazi controversy when, relying on talking points from the administration, she said during several television appearances that the attacks were spontaneous. The assessment turned out to be incorrect and...
(Washington Post 06/06/13)
Last week the State Department released its annual terrorism report. Of greatest note was the portion on Libya in the months leading up to Sept. 11, 2013. It relates the country’s descent into jihadist hell, chronicling the death and destruction wrought by Islamic militants. A brief excerpt: “In Libya, the security vacuum in the aftermath of the 2011 revolution provided more opportunities for terrorists to operate. This vacuum, combined with the weakness of Libya’s nascent security institutions, allowed violent extremists to act, as we saw too clearly on September 11 in Benghazi, when J. Christopher Stevens, the U.S. Ambassador to Libya, and three staff members, died during attacks on U.S. facilities.” Most striking is the long list of incidents: •...
(The Associated Press 06/06/13)
TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — Libya's premier on Wednesday ordered relocation of the headquarters of the state-run oil company to the eastern city of Benghazi, fulfilling a long-standing demand by residents of the region and comes days after tribal declared semi-independent region in the east. Prime Minister Ali Zidan told reporters that the decision was not taken under pressure, and that Libya's institutions must be present everywhere across the country. Benghazi was the birthplace of the uprising that ousted longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi in 2011. Despite its oil riches, eastern Libya's residents have complained for decades about discrimination by the west, where the capital, Tripoli, is located. The relocation of the National Oil Corporation and affiliated companies is expected to bring...
(Libya Herald 06/06/13)
The UK’s Minister for the Middle East and North Africa, Alistair Burt, arrived in Tripoli from Tunis today for a two-day visit aimed at providing practical support for Libya’s transition to democracy and prosperity. “This is a crucial point for Libya’s transition,” said Burt after arriving in Tripoli, his fourth visit to the country since liberation. “Although Libya has achieved much since the revolution two years ago, the government continues to face serious challenges, including improving security across the country and delivering improved public services to its people”. He said he would be meeting the Ministers of Foreign Affairs and Justice to discuss how the UK could continue to assist the government in addressing these challenges. “I will also meet...
(Libya Herald 06/06/13)
Speaking at the third day of MEED’s “Libya Projects 2013” conference in Tripoli yesterday, Assistant Deputy Minister of Telecommunications Atef Al Bahri said that his Ministry were working on four main issues. Firstly, they were working on a new Telecommunications law that would allow the private sector to compete in the telecoms sector. He said that the first draft of the law had been finished in March and that it had gone to public consultation. He further added that it was in the final stages before being referred to the GNC for enacting into law. Secondly, he explained that his Ministry were working on the securing of national networks and thirdly on enhancing these networks. The fourth main objective of...
(Libya Herald 06/06/13)
Opening the final day of the MEED “Libya Projects 2013″ conference, the Central Bank of Libya Governor Saddek Elkaber said that “it is not going to be easy to reform Libya’s economy. It will need legislative reforms”. Libya’s economy is limited and dependant on hydrocarbons and is the least diversified of oil-producing nations with oil representing 96 percent of exports, he added. But despite these challenges there are many reasons for optimism including Libya’s strategic position, its population with 50 percent between the age of 18 and 45 years old and oil reserves of 60 billion barrels. These are important factors for development, he noted. Ultimately, the CBL Governor felt that Libya needed to reform its legislation in order to...
(Business Daily 06/06/13)
Japan hosted the fifth meeting of TICAD, the Tokyo International Cooperation on African Development this week. The meeting is a reminder that, while the rest of the world obsesses over Europe’s economic travails, America’s political paralysis and growth slowdown in China and other emerging markets, there remains a region — sub-Saharan Africa — where poverty is almost the rule, not the exception. From 1990 to 2010, the number of people living in poverty ($1.25 per day) across sub-Sahara Africa rose from less than 300 million to nearly 425 million, while the number living on less than $2 a day grew from about 390 million to almost 600 million. Still, the proportion of those living in poverty declined from 57 per...
(Libya Herald 06/06/13)
Libya is poised to resume thousands of outstanding contracts worth tens of billions of dollars, said the boss of a leading international project management company, which is preparing to return to Libya. Speaking today on the third day of the MEED “Libya Projects 2013″ Conference, Jim Thompson, Chief Executive Global Programmes for AECOM, said: “We have thousands of contracts to enforce. Some are good. Some are a disaster.” “There are 300 major contracts that have been suspended estimated at about $40 billion” continued Thompson, “There will be a re-scoping of requirements and local companies will have plenty of opportunities to participate.” However, he warned that some of the joint ventures that were running a number of these projects were no...

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