Friday 20 April 2018
(Libya Herald 08/21/13)
Congress is happy with the government’s performance and has no intention of replacing it, Congress spokesman Omar Hemidan said this evening. He was speaking after Prime Minister Ali Zeidan had addressed Congress today on the latest developments in the country. Zeidan told members that security and illegal sales of oil were the most urgent issues facing Libya at present. The problems, he said, were because of the general instability of the country, the resignations of ministers of interior and defence, the spread of weapons and the lack of national dialogue. Commenting afterwards, Hemidan said that although a small number of Congress members had called for the government to be removed, the majority view was that Zeidan had ably defended his...
(Malta Today 08/21/13)
The Canadian engineering firm SNC-Lavalin, which has a 36% stake in a private consortium that owns the controlling 40% stake in Malta International Airport, may have taken "a political decision" to move out of Malta due to its proximity to a failed project in Libya. An official comment from SNC-Lavalin was not forthcoming by the time of going to print, after chief financial officer Alain-Pierre Raynaud told analysts that the firm could sell its MIA stake "in the near term". But a company insider speaking on the condition of anonymity told MaltaToday that SNC may have taken "a political decision" to distance itself from Libya, where the civil uprising against dictator Muammar Gaddafi cost the company some US$45.6 million, due...
(AFP (eng) 08/21/13)
WASHINGTON, August 21, 2013 (AFP) - Four officials placed on administrative leave during a probe into the deadly 2012 attack on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya, can return to work, the US State Department said Tuesday. The September 11 attack left four people dead, including ambassador Chris Stevens, and caused a political storm between US President Barack Obama's administration and his Republican opponents. An independent commission set up by former US secretary of state Hillary Clinton had found serious safety failings in the department and recommended sanctions against the four employees, who were placed on leave without pay. However, under a decision by Secretary of State John Kerry, the four will "be reassigned to different positions within the department,...
(AFP (eng) 08/20/13)
African immigrants warned Monday of a rise in racist attacks in Morocco, as hundreds gathered outside a morgue holding the body of a Senegalese man who was murdered last week. Some 250 people, mostly Senegalese immigrants, gathered outside the morgue in Rabat, where the man's remains were taken after he was stabbed to death on a bus in the Moroccan capital last Monday. Anna Bynes, a Senegalese student at Rabat university, said the attack was the latest in a string of racist violence targeting sub-Saharan Africans. "It is the last straw... The other day it was a Congolese man killed on a bus in Tangiers. Then a Gabonese woman was raped. Today a Senegalese has been killed." The police on...
(AFP (eng) 08/19/13)
BENGHAZI (AFP) – A former judge, aged 79, was gunned down as he left a mosque in the restive eastern city of Benghazi on Monday, a Libyan security services spokesman said. "Fethi Lekhfifi, a former judge, was shot dead as he came out of a mosque in Benghazi at dawn," said Colonel Abdallah al-Zayedi. He said the elderly man was struck by bullets to the head fired by unknown gunmen in a car, in an apparent revenge attack for his work as a judge. "The perpetrators were people with criminal records who had been sentenced by judge Lekhfifi," he said, noting that thousands of inmates had been set free during Libya's 2011 revolution. A hospital source said the ex-judge appeared...
(AL Jazeera 08/19/13)
Libya's Interior Minister Mohammed Khalifa al-Sheikh has resigned over differences with the prime minister, a parliament member and an official at the prime minister's office said. Al-Sheikh submitted his resignation to the cabinet and to parliament in protest against what he said was interference in his work by the government and parliament, Al-Sharif al-Wafi, a member of the Libyan General National Congress, told Reuters news agency.He said that he didn't have any understanding with the prime minister and that he didn't have enough mandate to carry out his work, Wafi said. He also complained that some members of the congress interfered in his work, Wafi added. An aide to the Prime Minister Ali Zeidan confirmed that al-Sheikh had submitted his...
(Libya Herald 08/19/13)
A peace deal between Reyayna and Zintan has been hammered out to end the cold war between the two neighbouring towns in the Western Mountains allowing residents of Reyayna to return home after two years of exile. Most of them fled the town after it was captured in mid-May 2011. Reyayna had largely supported Qaddafi during the revolution and helped attack Zintan. The situation is seen as comparable to that between Misrata and Tawergha. The return is expected to happen at the beginning of the new school year next month. “There was efforts to let the Reyayna displaced people to go back before Ramadan but the security situation was one of the reasons preventing implemention of the agreement” Zintan Local...
(CNN 08/19/13)
(CNN) -- A grenade exploded outside the Egyptian Consulate in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi on Saturday evening, Libyan state media reported. There were no casualties, but the Libyan state news agency LANA reported some material damage. Unidentified assailants threw a type of locally-made grenade at the consulate before they fled, Benghazi Joint Security Room spokesman Col. Abdullah Al-Zaidi said, according to LANA. The blast partially damaged the outer perimeter wall of the consulate and some vehicles parked nearby, the official said. Calls to the Egyptian Embassy in Tripoli and the consulate in Benghazi were immediately unsuccessful. By Jomana Karadsheh
(Libya Herald 08/19/13)
Staff at the head office of the Bank of North Africa in Tripoli’s Dahra district went on strike today after the general manager was seized this morning by brigadesmen saying that he had stolen millions of euros from the bank. Claiming that the general manager, Ali Zeidi, had been beaten in of them, some 40 staff protested outside the bank, next to the Planning Ministry, insisting that the embezzlement claims were none of the brigade’s business, that they were for the government to investigate. They accused the brigadesmen of seizing the manager not because they were concerned about dealing with crime, but because they wanted get their hands on the money themselves. It was not the first time this had...
(The Independent 08/17/13)
Fadil Aliriza reports from Zintan on the long wait for the dictator’s son to be tried – and the conspiracy theories that are filling the vacuum. On an old Saharan road in the small hours of a cold November night, darkness cloaked a Bedouin commander and his 14 men waiting in ambush. At 2:30 in the morning, their patience and their intelligence sources were proved justified, and two cars travelling along Libya’s borders with Niger and Algeria became mired in a depression in the sand. One man exited the first car, immediately fell flat, and buried his face in the sand. Commander Alajmi Ali Ahmed al-Atiri raised the man to his feet to inquire who he was. “He said: ‘My...
(AL Jazeera 08/16/13)
Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan has threatened to use force against guards who have been protesting at some of the country's main oil ports for several weeks. In a news conference on Thursday, the prime minister accused the guards of trying to sell oil outside official channels. Zeidan said the leader of the protesters, Ibrahim al-Jathran, who is the regional head of the Petroleum Facilities Guard, wanted to sell the oil independently of Libya's state National Oil Corp. “The head of the protesters wants to export oil for their own group, they do not want to make concessions,” he said. “If any tanker comes to the port to pick up oil then we will use any means to stop it...
(AFP (eng) 08/16/13)
Libya has accused striking guards who have seized oil export terminals of trying to make shipments for their own profit and threatened military action against any unauthorised vessel that docks. Prime Minister Ali Zeidan issued the warning late on Thursday, three weeks into the action by the security guards that has halted virtually all loadings at key terminals on the central coast. "A group of guards at oil terminals in the central region has decided to bring vessels they have organised themselves to export oil for their own profit," Zeidan charged. "Any vessel not under contract to the National Oil Company (NOC) that approaches the terminals will be bombed from the air and the sea," he said, adding he had...
(BBC News Africa 08/16/13)
Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan has threatened to use force to prevent guards striking at the country's main ports from selling oil independently. He said any ship approaching the ports which does not have a contract with Libya's official oil company would be "bombed from the sea or the air". The workers have been striking over pay for several weeks. Officials say the protests have caused a drop in Libya's oil exports and are harming the economy. "If the blockade of these oil terminals continues, the state will be obliged to use its power, and all the forces at its disposal, including the army," Mr Zeidan warned. He said that the ports of Zeitunia, Brega, Ras Lanouf and Sedra had...
(Libya Herald 08/16/13)
A new deepwater seaport is to be built at Zliten at an expected cost of several hundred million dinars to service the town’s development, despite being just 60 kilometres west of Misrata and 40 kilometres, east of Khoms. They are two of the country’s best deepwater ports. The Minister of Communications and Transport, Abdul Qader Mohammed Ahmed, agreed to the project following a formal request at the end of July from Zliten Local Council. Discussions with the ministry have, in fact, been ongoing for some considerable time. The Deputy Minister of Transport, Farid Gheblawi, who is in charge of ports, told the Libya Herald in June of Zliten’s hopes and said that a study would be commissioned to determine the...
(Libya Herald 08/16/13)
Speaking at Wednesday’s press conference, Prime Minister Ali Zaidan revealed that there has at last been some progress in the investigation of some of the crimes and terror activities that has been experienced by Libya. Zeidan said that there has been some progress in the investigations in the crimes and terror acts that have taken place in Benghazi and other cities. Investigations have gathered proof and have made some arrests and we will provide results to the public soon. I have been speaking to the Minister of Interior over the last few days and I have spoken to him today, Zeidan revealed. However, the Minister of Interior has requested that I delay any public announcements for a little while longer...
(Bloomberg 08/15/13)
One of the most amazing things about the Libyan Revolution was just how quickly the country’s oil industry rebounded from the chaos and violence of 2011. After bottoming out at only 45,000 barrels a day in August that year after having fallen 97 percent since the previous January, Libya’s oil production was back near full capacity—1.6 million barrels a day, by last summer. That’s a huge success by any measure. Now, nearly two years after the death of Muammar Qaddafi, Libya is backsliding into chaos. Striking workers angry about government corruption and low wages have attacked the engine of the country’s fragile economy: the export terminals and oil fields, many of them state-run, that hold Africa’s largest known crude reserves...
(International Business Times 08/14/13)
The sudden shutdown of two major oil pipeline terminals along the Mediterranean Sea has brought the North African country of Libya to a new breaking point, two years after the bloody Arab Spring revolution overthrew Moammar Gadhafi. Libya has a brand new transitional government and plenty of oil to fuel growth and recovery for its 6.5 million people. But those hydrocarbons have to leave the country if Libya is to profit from its most abundant resource. And, the current shutdown, which may turn out to be the worst since 2011, threatens to stifle long-term growth for the country's economy. Libya's two main sea terminals, Ras Lanuf and Es Sider, which have a combined output capacity of about 600,000 barrels per...
(AFP (eng) 08/14/13)
TRIPOLI – Some 14,000 prisoners who escaped from various Libyan detention centres after the 2011 uprising against Muammar Qaddafi are still on the run, the interior minister said. Speaking less than three weeks after more than 1,200 detainees escaped during riots from a prison in the eastern city of Benghazi, Mohamed al-Cheikh told ministry officials the interior and justice ministries were "working together to get them back to prison so they can serve out their sentences". "No fewer than 14,000 former prisoners who were serving sentences including capital punishment and life are still totally free after fleeing from prison," said Cheikh. "This situation is one of Libya's problems," the official news agency Lana quoted him as saying. Libya's authorities have...
(AFP (eng) 08/14/13)
BENGHAZI, Libya (AFP) – A colonel in the restive Libyan city of Benghazi escaped a bomb attack on Tuesday after discovering the device placed under his car outside his home, a security official said. The incident comes a day after a TV journalist survived an attack in Benghazi after coming under a hail of bullets. Colonel Jelal al-Arafi discovered the device and immediately ran away from the vehicle when the bomb exploded, security spokesman Colonel Abdallah al-Zayedi said. "He was injured in the foot and underwent surgery at a hospital in Benghazi," Zayedi said, adding that this was an "attempted assassination." Cradle of the 2011 uprising that ousted long-time dictator Moamer Kadhafi, Benghazi has been rocked by a series of...
(BBC News Africa 08/14/13)
Members of Libya's minority Berber, or Amazigh, community have stormed the parliament building in Tripoli. A spokesman for the General National Congress (GNC) said windows were smashed, furniture destroyed and documents belonging to deputies stolen. There were no reports of any injuries after the incident, which happened during a break in a regular session. The Amazigh were demanding that the future constitution recognise their language, ethnicity and culture. Though they make up just 5-10% of Libya's six million population, Amazigh predate the Arab settlers who brought Islam with them from the east. They suffered decades of repression and discrimination during the rule of Muammar Gaddafi, who was overthrown during an uprising in 2011. Gaddafi saw Amazigh as a threat to...

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