Wednesday 22 November 2017
(Xinhuanet 04/18/13)
ANTANANARIVO, April 18 (Xinhua) -- Madagascar will close its embassy in Tripoli, Libya, for insufficiency of money, according to the latest decision by the government of the Indian Ocean island country. "Maintaining this Embassy to work means a significant financial impact on the public purse and it is advisable to close it temporarily," said a statement issued at the end of a cabinet meeting held on Wednesday. During political events in Libya in 2011, Madagascar decided to evacuate to Tunisia employees of its Embassy in Tripoli before the final repatriation of non-essential employees in June 2011. The ambassador and the accountant continued their work in the Malagasy Embassy in Libya, but in April 2012, the ambassador was repatriated with only...
(Reuters (Eng) 04/15/13)
Sub-Saharan Africa's economic growth should accelerate to more than 5 percent over the next three years, far outpacing the global average, but the region must do more to convert this into reducing poverty, the World Bank said on Monday. In its latest Africa's Pulse analysis of prospects for the region, the bank saw increased investment, high commodity prices and a pick-up in the global economy driving this expected growth surge in the world's poorest continent. It said foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows to Sub-Saharan Africa were projected to increase to record levels each year over the next three years, reaching $54 billion by 2015. This compared to $37.7 billion in 2012, a 5.5 percent increase in a year when FDI...
(Reuters (Eng) 04/10/13)
Carlyle Group (CG.O) is looking at a number of banks in east and west Africa for a potential investment, its Africa co-head said on Wednesday, as the U.S. private equity firm focuses on the continent's growing consumer market. Carlyle, which last year invested in a pan-African grain trading firm, has recently signed a second deal, Marlon Chigwende also told the Reuters Africa Investment Summit. "Banking is very interesting today, and that is the general statement across a lot of sub-Saharan Africa," Chigwende told the Reuters Africa Investment Summit in Johannesburg. "Certainly, there are several opportunities of fast-growing banks, good management teams, interesting market positioning." Although private equity is still at a nascent stage in Africa, investor interest in the fast-growing...
(Reuters (Eng) 04/10/13)
Weapons are spreading from Libya at an "alarming rate," fueling conflicts in Mali, Syria and elsewhere and boosting the arsenals of extremists and criminals in the region, according to a U.N. report published on Tuesday. The report by the U.N. Security Council's Group of Experts - who monitor an arms embargo imposed on Libya at the start of an uprising in 2011 which ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi - said the North African state had become a key source of weapons in the region as its nascent government struggles to exert authority. Libyan government security forces remain weak and militias, made up of former rebel fighters, hold power on the ground. "Cases, both proven and under investigation, of illicit transfers from...
(Reuters (Eng) 04/10/13)
(Reuters) - Weapons are spreading from Libya at an "alarming rate," fueling conflicts in Mali, Syria and elsewhere and boosting the arsenals of extremists and criminals in the region, according to a U.N. report published on Tuesday. The report by the U.N. Security Council's Group of Experts - who monitor an arms embargo imposed on Libya at the start of an uprising in 2011 which ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi - said the North African state had become a key source of weapons in the region as its nascent government struggles to exert authority. Libyan government security forces remain weak and militias, made up of former rebel fighters, hold power on the ground. "Cases, both proven and under investigation, of illicit...
(Reuters (Eng) 03/28/13)
Unknown assailants blew up a major Sufi shrine in the Libyan capital on Thursday, residents said, the first such attack since several last year in the North African country. Ultra-conservative Islamists have targeted sites belonging to Islam's Sufi tradition, which they brand idolatrous, since the end of a 2011 war that ousted Muammar Gaddafi. There were about a dozen attacks on Sufi shrines last spring and summer. Thursday's bombing took place in the early morning and struck the Sidi Al-Andlusi mausoleum in the Tripoli suburb of Tajoura, residents said. The shrine of a Sufi theologian from the 15th century is protected under law as a national monument. "It was a bomb attack. The doors and windows were blown out, the...
(International Business Times 03/28/13)
With Egypt’s foreign currency reserves pretty much exhausted, no tourism industry, and no International Monetary Fund deal finalized or announced, President Hosni Mubarak is looking anywhere for help to prop up his country’s slowly melting economy. The Qatari government was kind enough to hand over $4 billion of support earlier in March. But, Libya? It might not be that crazy of an idea. Libya is still dealing with political reform and attempting to control separatist groups after overthrowing its own dictator, Moammar Gadhafi, in 2011. Despite this, its economy, dependent mostly on oil, rebounded very quickly after the revolution. A report released by the IMF in 2012 showed that Libya’s oil exports, while still down, were on a very healthy...
( 03/27/13)
Libya is considering extending financial aid to Egypt to help its North African neighbor overcome a severe economic crisis, Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zaidan said on Wednesday. Egypt, which has endured more than two years of political instability since the overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak in 2011, is struggling with sliding currency reserves, falling tourism and a soaring budget deficit. OPEC-producer Libya is itself rebuilding after the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011. Several newspapers had reported this week that Libya will deposit $2 billion at Egypt's central bank to support the economy but Zaidan said nothing had been decided yet. "It has been under consultation. This issue has not been decided yet," Zaidan told reporters in the Qatari capital...
(Reuters (Eng) 03/26/13)
"BRICS, Don't Carve Africa" reads a banner in a church hall in downtown Durban where civil society activists have gathered to cast a critical eye at a summit of five global emerging powers. The slogan evokes the 19th Century conference in Berlin where the predominant European colonial states carved up the African continent in a scramble historians see as epitomizing the brash exploitative capitalism of the time. Decades after Africans threw off the colonial yoke, it is the turn of the blossoming BRICS group of Brazil, Russia, China, India and South Africa to find their motives coming under scrutiny as they proclaim an altruistic-sounding "partnership for development, integration and industrialization" with Africa. Led by that giant of the emerging powers,...
(Reuters (Eng) 03/26/13)
President Barack Obama hosts the leaders of four African nations this week, all of which are cited in a new report for effectively increasing spending on agriculture to combat extreme poverty and hunger. The report by the ONE Campaign, an anti-poverty group co-founded by Irish rockers Bono and Bob Geldof, said Senegal, Malawi, Cape Verde and Sierra Leone either met or were close to meeting targets for increased budget spending on agriculture. All of the countries, except Cape Verde where there is little data, are also on track or close to meeting a U.N. target of halving extreme poverty by 2015, the report said. The African leaders will visit the White House on Thursday to showcase their fledgling democracies, but...
(The New York Times 03/26/13)
BEIJING — As President Xi Jinping of China continues his first overseas trip as his country’s leader, arriving in South Africa late on Monday after Russia and Tanzania, he meets with much goodwill – but also some concern among Africans that China may be a “new colonial power,” extracting resources and selling manufactured goods, as I reported on Sunday. China knows it. In a speech in Tanzania, Mr. Xi sought to calm the concerns, as my colleagues Chris Buckley and Jeffrey Gettleman reported. “China frankly faces up to the new circumstances and new problems in Sino-African relations,” Mr. Xi told an audience of Tanzanian politicians and officials in Dar es Salaam, the country’s economic hub and a center of government,...
(Libya Herald 03/20/13)
Benghazi was in jubilant mood last night, Tuesday, as it celebrated the second anniversary of the destruction by French fighter planes of the Qaddafi tank column that was heading towards the city. Thousands converged on the city centre for the festivities. French flags flew or were waved alongside Libyan ones and the celebrations lasted well into the night. Such was the crush that former French President Nicolas Sarkozy who had flown unexpectedly from Tripoli for a brief visit to join in the celebrations had to turn back to the airport because of the crowds obstructing the roads. According to Prime Minister Ali Zeidan, the route was blocked by masses of excited people hoping for a glimpse of the former French...
(BBC News Africa 03/20/13)
Egyptian police have arrested a close aide and cousin of the late Libyan leader, Col Muammar Gaddafi. Ahmed Gaddaf al-Dam was Tripoli's special envoy to Cairo for many years and left Libya for Egypt shortly after the 2011 uprising against Col Gaddafi. Egypt's prosecutor general has ordered Mr Gaddaf al-Dam's detention for 30 days while charges against him are investigated. He gave himself up to Egyptian police after his home in Cairo was surrounded. Mr Gaddaf al-Dam is one of several high-profile Libyan figures residing in Egypt who have been pursued by Libyan authorities and the international police body Interpol since the end of the war.'Documents forged' Libya's deputy attorney general Taha Baara confirmed the arrest, saying Libya had presented...
(Libya Herald 03/20/13)
Interior Minister Ashour Shuwail and Chief of the Armed Forces Yousef Mangoush, meet in Tripoli on Sunday, 17 March, to visit the premises of the newly formed joint security force, between the Ministry of Interior and Defense. Speaking to the infantry of the joint force, Shuwail said Libya was entering the most difficult period of its development, that of building a new state based on the rule of law, freedom, human rights and democracy. The state’s authority and legitimacy had to be recognised. He added that Libya was a prosperous and strategically located nation and, to move forward, order and stability had to be restored. The joint security force represented a commitment to achieve the goals of the revolution, and...
(Libya Herald 03/20/13)
Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy has called on Libyans to work on reconciliation with those who supported or worked for the Qaddafi regime. He made the call at a meeting with members of Tripoli Local Council during his visit to the council’s offices in Algeria Square today, Tuesday. He had been invited by head of the council, Sadat Elbadri, to celebrate the second anniversary of the France’s decisive entry into the war against Qaddafi’s regime. “I will tell you, as a friend – I would say as a brother – and from the bottom of my heart, you have to achieve the reconciliation. Libya needs all its children,” he said. “Everything cannot be forgiven, monstrosities cannot be forgotten,” he added...
(The Tripoli Post 03/20/13)
The National Congress approved the budget for the year 2013 of 66.8 billion Libyan dinars. The budget has been approved at the 73rd meeting of the NG after intensive discussions and participation of the elected members of the NG. The National Congress also made it imperative on the government of Ali Zidan to finalize state budgets over the past years before 31 December 2013.
(ABC News 03/18/13)
Libya's health minister says the death toll from drinking homemade alcohol that contained poisonous methanol has risen to 87. Minister Nouri Doghman says 1,044 people have been harmed. He said Sunday that 15 people were blinded, and others went into comas or suffered kidney failure. He said some people admitted themselves to the hospital too late, contributing to the increasing toll. The deaths were first reported a week ago. The dead range in age from 19 to 50 years old. The sale and consumption of alcohol is banned in the conservative North African country. Like illegal drugs elsewhere, some Libyans turn to black market dealers to buy alcohol, which is often cooked in homes or deserted farms.
(Reuters (Eng) 03/18/13)
Libya’s Economic and Social Development Fund is showing a deficit of $4.7 billion as its revenue from investments declined following the 2011 revolution that toppled Muammar Qaddafi, Chairman Mahmoud Badi said. The fund, tasked with providing support to needy families, has yet to receive dividends from most of the companies and projects in which it has investments in Libya, Badi said in an interview yesterday in Tripoli. “Current average income received from the fund is at $390 million per year while payments amount to $936 million per year,” he said. “We are facing a difficult period.” The fund is part of the Libyan Investment Authority, the North African nation’s sovereign wealth fund. Badi said the ESDF liquidated most investments abroad...
(ABC News 03/18/13)
Waha Oil Co.’s pipeline in Libya was shut because of a strike at its Gialo field resulting in a cut in the country’s crude output by 120,000 barrels a day, Oil Minister Abdulbari al-Arusi said. The protest is continuing today at the Gialo field, which feeds crude into a pipeline that runs to the Es Sider export terminal, Abduljalil Mayuf, spokesman of Arabian Gulf Oil Co., a unit of National Oil Corp., said by phone from the eastern city of Benghazi. Nuri Berruien, chairman of state-run NOC, which owns Waha Oil in partnership with ConocoPhillips, Hess Corp. and Marathon Oil Corp., couldn’t be reached on his mobile phone for comment. Libya, holder of Africa’s largest crude reserves, is struggling to...
(Reuters (Eng) 03/14/13)
Catholics in Africa and Asia on Thursday greeted the election of Pope Francis from Argentina as a historic breakthrough that would pump the developing world's vital energy into a struggling Church and amplify the voice of the planet's poor. While there was disappointment that Pope Benedict's successor did not come from the African or Asian continents, Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio's Third World origins spurred hopes of a kindred spirit among Catholics from Manila to Maputo. Argentina, in Latin America's southern cone, is as far from Africa and Asia as Europe, the prime source of previous pontiffs. But these rapidly developing southern continents of the globe, where poverty still looms large, are now home to the world's fastest growing Catholic communities. African...

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