| Africatime
Saturday 29 April 2017
(Voice of America 04/28/17)
A low-cost and widely available drug could save the lives of 1 in 3 mothers who would otherwise bleed to death after childbirth, according to a new study. Severe bleeding, known as postpartum hemorrhage, or PPH, is the leading cause of maternal death worldwide, killing more than 100,000 women every year. Even for mothers who survive, it is a painful and traumatic experience. The world's poorest countries, especially in Africa and India, are the worst hit. Drug from 1960s But there is new hope. In the 1960s, Japanese researchers developed a drug called tranexamic acid, which works by stopping blood clots from breaking down. But they could not persuade doctors to try the drug for...
(Bloomberg 04/20/17)
Libya’s El-Feel oil field, operated by a venture between Eni SpA and the state producer, re-opened after a two-year halt in operations that crimped the OPEC nation’s output, according to a person familiar with the situation. The field, also known as Elephant, re-opened on Wednesday, said the person, who asked not to be identified because of a lack of authorization to speak to media. It hasn’t resumed pumping oil yet because of an electricity outage, Petroleum Facilities Guard Brigadier Idris Bukhamada said by phone. Authorities are working to resolve the power stoppage soon, he said. El-Feel in western Libya was due to re-open in December, but guards demanding benefits prevented that from happening, National Oil Corp. said in January. The...
(Bloomberg 04/20/17)
WorldRemit Ltd., a British money-transfer operator, sees revenue from transactions involving Africans doubling by 2020 as more people on the continent access mobile-payment platforms and expatriates send cash home. The seven-year-old company, in which Facebook Inc.-backer Accel Partners LP invested $40 million in 2014, will this year open a regional office in South Africa, its largest market on the continent in terms of money-transfer value, founder and Chief Executive Officer Ismail Ahmed said in an interview. Another site will start...
(Voice of America 04/18/17)
More than 1,000 migrants picked up off the coast of Libya Sunday have arrived at a port on the Italian island of Sicily. A German navy ship brought the rescued migrants to the port of Catania Monday aboard the FGS Rhein. Some 29,000 migrants, most of them fleeing poverty in sub-Saharan Africa, have arrived in Italy this year after being rescued by European military ships or private charity organizations. The U.N. migration agency (IOM) reported last week that 31,993 migrants...
(Voice of America 04/17/17)
The Italian coast guard says it has rescued nearly 6,000 migrants on the Mediterranean since Friday, underscoring the continued flow of people along this dangerous route. A group of Africans living in Europe visited Cameroon this week to launch a campaign against illegal migration. The group is called “No More Death in the Desert or on the Sea.” Its mission is simple: to educate youth in Africa about the harsh realities of illegal migration. "We want to tell them that...
(Sputnik 04/13/17)
According to the Libyan National Army Commander, the issue of establishment of the Russian military base in Libya is not being discussed. The issue of establishment of the Russian military base in Libya is not being discussed, Libyan National Army Commander Khalifa Haftar told Sputnik Thursday. "This issue has not been discussed at all. I do not think that Russia has the desire or the need to establish a military base in Libya. Russia has a giant fleet in the...
(Financial Times 04/13/17)
G7 foreign ministers are set to underline their backing for the UN-sponsored government in Libya headed by prime minister Fayez al-Sarraj, easing concerns about a major shift in US policy with regard to the North African country. According to a section of the communiqué being discussed in Lucca, Italy, and seen by the Financial Times, the G7′s top diplomats will express “strong support” for Mr Sarraj’s government and “firm opposition to any attempt to disrupt the stabilisation process”. Italian officials...
(Voice of America 04/05/17)
A Red Cross report says African countries are failing their internally displaced people. Reversing that trend was the subject of a high level meeting of the International Red Cross and the African Union that wrapped up Tuesday in Zimbabwe. Africa has about 13 million internally displaced people, a third of the global number of IDPs, and more than double the amount of refugees on the continent. By definition, refugees flee across a national border, while IDPs leave their homes but...
(Bloomberg 04/04/17)
Oil’s rally above $50 a barrel is running out of steam after Libyan production returns, bringing the focus back to OPEC. Futures in New York extended losses after dropping 0.7 percent on Monday, following a 5.5 percent jump last week. While OPEC output fell by 200,000 barrels a day in March, the decline was helped by cuts in Nigeria and Libya that are exempt from its production-curb deal to shrink a global glut, a Bloomberg News survey shows. Libya was...
(Financial Times 04/04/17)
Countries should develop policies to attract labour-intensive production leaving China. China’s initial wave of investments in Africa focused on natural resource extraction. Their demand for metals and energy was so large that it actually boosted global commodity prices overall, which in turn accelerated growth across the African continent. These times of China propping up global commodity prices are now over, as it has built up excess capacity in many sectors and now faces slow investment growth. This lower demand has...
(Bloomberg 04/03/17)
Libya’s crude production rebounded to about 660,000 barrels a day as the OPEC nation’s biggest oil field resumed output after about a week of disruption. Force majeure on the Zawiya export terminal was lifted after pumping resumed Sunday at Sharara, the nation’s biggest oil field, Mustafa Sanalla, chairman of Libya’s state-run National Oil Corp., said Monday by phone. Libya’s overall production is 660,000 barrels a day, according to a person familiar with the matter who isn’t authorized to speak to...
(The Guardian 03/30/17)
Power struggle could undermine authority of UN-backed Libyan Government of National Accord. A power struggle for control of Libya’s oil is threatening to deepen splits in the country and undermine the fragile authority of the UN-backed Libyan Government of National Accord, the GNA. The battle has forced the politically neutral chairman of the Libyan National Oil Corporation (NOC) to warn the GNA that it has overstepped its authority both by closing the oil ministry and by trying to take over some of the NOC’s role. The attack by Libyan oil boss Mustafa Sanalla’s may weaken already fraying international support for the Tripoli
(Bloomberg 03/29/17)
Oil rose after a pipeline halt reduced output in OPEC member Libya, countering concerns that a U.S. surplus shows little sign of diminishing. Libya’s output was said to fall to about 500,000 barrels a day after a pipeline carrying crude from the Sharara field -- its biggest -- stopped operating. Clashes between armed groups in the nation have previously led to market disruptions, and the latest news drove New York oil futures up as much as 1 percent after boosting...
(Bloomberg 03/28/17)
Libya’s biggest oil field was said to stop producing, leading to a 20 percent decline in crude output from the country with Africa’s largest reserves. The OPEC nation’s output dropped to 560,000 barrels a day, according to a person familiar with the matter who isn’t authorized to speak to the media and asked not to be identified. The North African country was pumping 700,000 barrels a day, Mustafa Sanalla, chairman of state-run National Oil Corp., said on March 22. Oil prices rose as much as 1.4 percent. The pipeline carrying crude from Sharara, Libya’s biggest field, to the Zawiya
(AL Jazeera 03/28/17)
Maimuna Aghliw tells of normal day in the Libyan city of Misrata, peppered with hints of a war nearby. Libyan activist, Maimuna Aghliw, who has been living in Misrata since 2009, reflects on life there during wartime. Aghliw, 26, spent some time working at an NGO, focusing on psychosocial support, visiting different elementary and secondary schools. She also spent time teaching and tutoring children of various ages. Here, she talks about her experience as a teacher in war-torn Libya. Misrata,...
(Voice of America 03/28/17)
The World Health Organization and U.N. children's fund are spearheading a massive immunization campaign across Africa to rid the continent of the last vestiges of polio. Tens of thousands of health workers will fan out across 13 central and western African countries to vaccinate more than 116 million children under age five against the crippling disease. The U.N. agencies report more than 190,000 volunteers, traveling on foot or bicycle, will go house to house across all cities, towns, and villages...
(AL Jazeera 03/23/17)
Libyan prime minister asked for rescue and emergency equipment to curb illegal migration across its border into Europe. Ongoing consultations between the UN-backed government in Tripoli, representatives of the interior ministers of Italy and other eight European countries aim at bolstering an agreement signed in February, when Libya agreed to tackle the smuggling of migrants into Europe. EU Migration Commissioner, Dimitris Avramopoulos, and interior ministers from Algeria and Tunisia also attended the meeting. On Monday, during talks with European officials...
(Voice of America 03/18/17)
Each year, the University of Southern California hosts the African Global Economic and Development Summit, bringing delegations from Africa to meet with business leaders, government officials and others in the U.S. But this year, the African summit has no Africans. All were denied visas. Visa issues are not uncommon for people traveling from African nations. During her prior three summits, Mary Flowers saw a high percentage of her attendees unable to attain visas. "Usually we get 40 percent that get...
(Voice of America 03/17/17)
One of the enduring legacies of the Barack Obama presidency will be the relationship built between the United States and young Africans. As part of Obama’s Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI), each year 1,000 young people from sub-Saharan Africa travel to the United States to spend six weeks at a U.S. college or university. The program will continue this summer. But building enduring relationships is a two-way street, and many in Africa want to see Americans coming to their continent...
(The Wall Street Journal 03/15/17)
Ndalo Media founder Khanyi Dhlomo and Mara Group founder Ashish Thakkar on where the potential is and what’s blocking it How is innovation in Africa different from innovation in Silicon Valley? And how can innovation in Africa be encouraged? Dan Keeler, frontier-markets editor of The Wall Street Journal, discussed those questions with Khanyi Dhlomo, founder and chief executive of Ndalo Media, a publisher based in South Africa, and Ashish Thakkar, founder of Mara Group, a pan-African investment group with operations...

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