Monday 23 October 2017
(BBC 10/04/17)
Boris Johnson has said Libyan city Sirte could be the new Dubai, adding, "all they have to do is clear the dead bodies away". The foreign secretary's comments at a Conservative conference fringe meeting have sparked anger, with Labour calling them "crass, callous and cruel". Conservative MP Heidi Allen said he should be sacked, as did the Lib Dems. Mr Johnson claimed his critics had "no knowledge or understanding of Libya" and accused them of playing politics. "I look at Libya, it's an incredible country," he told the meeting. "Bone-white sands, beautiful sea, Caesar's Palace, obviously, you know, the real one. "Incredible place. It's got a real potential and brilliant young people who want to...
(Bloomberg 09/28/17)
Libya’s oil output is rising again after disruptions ended at its biggest field, with production reaching about 950,000 barrels a day even as OPEC and allied suppliers step up efforts to contain a global glut. Output at the North African nation’s Sharara field has recovered to 230,000 barrels a day, according to a person familiar with the matter, who asked not to be identified because they aren’t allowed to speak to the media. Libya was pumping 1.05 million barrels a day in August, the person said, before an armed group closed a pipeline linked to the field and caused Sharara to halt production for more than two weeks. Libya, with Africa’s largest crude reserves, is staging a modest recovery as...
(Voice of America 09/28/17)
The U.N. Human Rights Office warns rival governments and armed militias in Libya are in violation of international humanitarian and human rights laws and their abusive actions threaten the stability of the country. The U.N. Human Rights Council in Geneva is reviewing a report on the situation. The report makes for grim reading. Six years after former Libyan dictator, Moammar Gadhafi was toppled, it finds armed groups including the internationally recognized Government of National Accord and the opposition Libyan National...
(Bloomberg 09/27/17)
Studio 189, a label founded by actress Rosario Dawson and fashion executive Abrima Erwiah, is reinvesting in its African roots. It’s hard enough to build a fashion brand, let alone an empire. Rare is the person who makes a mission of using fashion to build communities. Such is the case with Studio 189, a label founded by longtime friends Abrima Erwiah (formerly a marketing executive at Bottega Veneta) and Rosario Dawson (an enduring star most recently seen in Netflix’s Marvel...
(The Guardian 09/25/17)
Ex-CIA asset Khalifa Haftar, due to meet Italian officials in Rome, ordered soldiers to commit war crimes, according to legal experts. European leaders are embracing a Libyan general who has ordered his soldiers to commit war crimes, according to new evidence that has been analysed by senior legal experts. The allegation of human rights abuses by Gen Khalifa Haftar, a former CIA asset who controls nearly half of Libya from his base in the east, comes as the general is...
(Bloomberg 09/25/17)
OPEC’s commitment to cutting production to clear a global glut is working, but the group needs to address rising output from Libya and Nigeria, Iran’s Oil Minister Bijan Namdar Zanganeh said. Compliance with the output cuts is “acceptable,” Zanganeh told reporters Sunday in Tehran. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries should focus on “the situation with Libya and Nigeria,” he said, referring to the two countries exempted from capping production due to their internal strife. Nigeria will be able to...
(Voice of America 09/25/17)
African first ladies and activists hailed progress that some governments on the continent are making on gender equality. They met on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. “We used to have 23 percent female representation in parliament but, with the stroke of a pen it went up to 48 percent. So, we managed to double our female representation with that decision,” said Namibia’s first lady Monica Geingos at a roundtable invitation-only event co-hosted by the...
(Middle East Monitor 09/22/17)
Saiqa Special Forces in Libya have found a mass grave containing 80 bodies at a site of ancient ruins near the Sidi Khribesh lighthouse in Benghazi’s Sabri district. According to Mari Al-Houti, the head of investigations with Saiqa, the Red Crescent collected the bodies and took DNA samples so that they could be identified. The mass grave is believed to contain the bodies of those killed in recent fighting in the city between militants and the Libyan National Army. The...
(Gulfnews 09/22/17)
The group measures led to an 80 per cent fall in the arrival of rescued migrants in Italy last month A powerful armed group, known for smuggling people from Libya, is seeking legitimacy and state security jobs from the Tripoli government in exchange for stopping migrant boats from leaving the coast of Sabratha for Italy, a senior group member said. The group, the Anas Al Dabbashi brigade, struck a deal with Libya’s United Nations-backed Government of National Accord (GNA) this...
(Bloomberg 09/21/17)
The United Nations said its road map for peace in Libya wasn’t working in its current form and unveiled plans to revamp the agreement to unify the North African country and pave the way for new elections. Ghassan Salame, the UN’s envoy for Libya, outlined an action plan at a high-level meeting Wednesday in New York. He said the initiative would be led by Libyans to find a way out of the crisis that’s split the nation among rival militias...
(Le Monde 09/21/17)
Président de la Fondation Brazzaville, Jean-Yves Ollivier plaide pour le plan de paix de l’organisation panafricaine prônant la mise en place de nouveaux organes de transition. Sous le pays plongé dans le chaos, l’ex-Jamahiriya de Kadhafi, ces anciennes provinces ottomanes – la Tripolitaine, la Cyrénaïque et le Fezzan – que seule la tutelle étrangère unifiait, perce enfin une Libye nouvelle. Elle sera unie, démocratique et prospère à condition d’être la Libye des Libyens. Elle verra le jour dans les semaines...
(The Guardian 09/18/17)
Anna Jones says that, through selling its cocoa cheaply, Africa is exporting its wealth overseas; while Sue Banford claims that the soya moratorium in the Amazon has done nothing to halt deforestation. Only the final paragraph in your article on cocoa farming causing deforestation in Ivory Coast (Forests pay price for world’s taste for cocoa, 14 September) mentioned the most fundamental thing – the farmer’s livelihood, or lack of it. The low value of his (or more likely her) crop...
(Bloomberg 09/15/17)
Societe Generale SA, challenged on its home turf by Orange SA’s push into banking, is fighting back with a new mobile lender in Africa. The French lender started YUP, a new app for smartphones, in Senegal and Ivory Coast and plans to begin operating in four other sub-Saharan countries this year and next, the company said on Thursday. The bank aims to double its client base to 2 million in the region within three years. “Telcos have opened the way...
(The Guardian 09/12/17)
Ghassan Salamé is due to tell conference convened by Boris Johnson that efforts to unite country are being hampered. Fears that overlapping European and Middle Eastern peace initiatives for Libya are hampering the new UN special envoy are to be aired this week at a special conference convened by the UK foreign secretary, Boris Johnson. The conference on Thursday, due to be attended by the US secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, is likely to swing behind a plan to restart political talks, including making changes to a December 2015 peace deal that has so far failed to unite warring factions in the east and west of the country.
(Bloomberg 09/12/17)
Less than a year after being driven out of its Libyan stronghold, Islamic State is re-emerging in the North African oil producer. The group is “dangerously active” on the western fringes of the main oil producing region, in an area of about 40,000 square kilometers, according to Ibrahim Mlitan, who’s in charge of security in nearby Sirte. Militants have been seen roaming the coastal highway in armored vehicles, setting up checkpoints and searching for opponents. Their vows to reestablish Islamic State rule have caused panic among locals, he said. Backed by U.S. airstrikes, forces loyal to the United Nations-backed
(Bloomberg 09/11/17)
The South African companies that dominate the U.K.’s growing private hospital industry are counting on more people like Katie Corrie. A children’s party entertainer, Corrie opted to use 13,000 pounds ($17,000) of her savings and inheritance to get a hip replacement rather than spend months on a National Health Service waiting list. Britons like her are forking out almost 1 billion pounds a year to cover their own medical expenses, a trend that’s giving at least one industry the scope...
(The Guardian 09/07/17)
Interior minister Marco Minniti went to Libya in an attempt to reduce migrant flows, earning praise and condemnation in equal measure for his approach. In his eight months in office, Marco Minniti, the austere Italian interior minister, has overseen a huge reduction in the number of African migrants and refugees reaching Italian shores from Libya. At the last count in August, the figure was 87% down on the previous year. A former communist with deep connections with Italian intelligence and...
(Bloomberg 09/07/17)
African Rainbow Minerals Ltd., the miner chaired by South Africa’s richest black businessman, will pay a record dividend this year as rising iron-ore and manganese prices boosted earnings at its ferrous unit. ARM will pay investors 6.50 rand a share, almost triple that of the previous year, and its 11th consecutive dividend, the Johannesburg-based company said in a statement Thursday. The company benefited from a 45 percent increase in prices received for exported iron ore and 93 percent more for...
(Bloomberg 09/06/17)
The pipeline that transports crude from Libya’s largest oil field reopened after a halt of more than two weeks, putting pressure on OPEC and other producers seeking to rein in a global supply glut and firm up prices. Libyan authorities reopened a valve on the pipeline from the southwestern Sharara field to the Zawiya refinery after they reached a final agreement with a militia group that had closed the link, according to a person familiar with the matter, who asked...
(The Telegraph 09/05/17)
A humanitarian organisation that has saved the lives of 40,000 migrants in the Mediterranean has suspended its operations, citing security concerns and “increasing instability” off the coast of Libya. The Malta-based Migrant Offshore Aid Station, which was founded by a pair of philanthropists, said it wanted nothing to do with Libya’s interception of migrant boats leaving its coast. It will instead redeploy its flagship, the Phoenix, to South-east Asia to help Rohingya refugees who are fleeing from Myanmar to Bangladesh...

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