Monday 25 September 2017
(AFP (eng) 09/23/17)
FUS Rabat of Morocco proved the nemesis of CS Sfaxien of Tunisia again Friday as they advanced to the CAF Confederation Cup semi-finals. Although the Moroccan club suffered a 1-0 second-leg loss in Tunisia, tying the quarter-final aggregate score at 1-1, they won 5-4 on penalties. FUS shocked Sfaxien in the 2010 Confederation Cup final by winning 3-2 in Tunisia after been written off as no-hopers following a goalless first leg. Karim Aouadhi, who netted the lone second-leg goal from a 23rd-minute penalty in Mediterranean city Sfax, was the only player not to score in the shootout. It was an uncharacteristic miss by the 1.94-metre midfielder, whose six-goal haul this season in the African equivalent...
(Morocco World News 09/22/17)
Between 28 April and 7 July, Moroccan banks foreign currency assets increased by $1.6 billion ahead of the previously expected announcement of Dirham Liberalization, according to Fitch. On the eve of the liberalization of the dirham, the Moroccan market witnessed a severe rush on currency stocks, led by fears of an unprecedented depreciation. Trading rooms entered into a frenzy as commercial bank’s “speculations” against the dirham went wild. These worries drained Morocco’s net international reserves by 14.3 percent in US dollar terms at July 7 from their end-April level, reaching $20.9 billion, their lowest level in nearly two years.
(Morocco World News 09/22/17)
A recent survey reveals some hidden gems for investors looking to put their money to work overseas. Botswana, Morocco, and Egypt are Africa’s best nations for foreign direct investment (FDI), according to a survey by an Africa-based economic research institute. Botswana is as close to an actual gem as a country can be; its economy is driven by its diamond mines. The southern African nation tops the list because of its stable democracy, improved credit rating, current account ratio, import...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/22/17)
From deadly droughts and destroyed crops to shrinking water sources, communities across sub-Saharan Africa are struggling to withstand the onslaught of global record-breaking temperatures. But the dangers do not end there. Rising heat poses another threat - one that is far less known and studied but could spark disease epidemics across the continent, scientists say. Mosquitoes are the menace, and the risk goes beyond malaria. The Aedes aegypti mosquito, which spreads debilitating and potentially deadly viruses, from Zika and dengue...
(The Associated Press 09/21/17)
A top Moroccan security official says his government is working on a new strategy to track Moroccans who become radicalized in Europe, part of beefed-up counterterrorism efforts by a country that is both a key player in the global anti-extremism struggle and a source of international jihadis. Preventing radicalization of Moroccans abroad is especially important after Spanish extremists with Moroccan origins carried out last month's deadly Barcelona attacks, Abdelhak Khiame, director of an agency known as Morocco's FBI, told The Associated Press in an interview.
(Reuters (Eng) 09/21/17)
Makers of generic AIDS drugs will start churning out millions of pills for Africa containing a state-of-the-art medicine widely used in rich countries, after securing a multi-million dollar guarantee that caps prices at just $75 per patient a year. Global health experts hope the deal will help address two looming problems in the HIV epidemic - the rising threat of resistance developing to standard AIDS drugs, and the need for more investment in manufacturing capacity. Bill Gates’ charitable foundation will...
(Middle East Monitor 09/20/17)
Morocco’s King Mohammed VI has received an award for Special Recognition of Leadership in Promoting Tolerance and Intercultural Reconciliation from the foundation Global Coalition for Hope despite the suppression of protests in the north of the country in the last year. The King’s son, Prince Moulay Rachid, accepted the award on behalf of this father at a ceremony held at the Public Library in New York under the patronage of UNESCO in the presence of Heads of State, diplomatic representatives...
(Xinhuanet 09/19/17)
The Moroccan city of Casablanca will host a new edition of Africa Security Forum on October 8-10, organizers announced on Monday. The 2017 edition will bring together more than 400 participants from 45 different African nations to discuss the Inter-African cooperation in the face of terrorism, radicalization and transnational crime, the president of the forum Driss Benamer told a press conference to shed lights on the forum. It will feature three main topics, namely terrorism, cyberspace, and new vectors of radicalization; the new challenges of migration and transnational criminality and the Inter-African cooperation and its new challenges, he added. "The Africa Security Forum, by adopting a broad and comprehensive approach
(Xinhuanet 09/19/17)
Tourist arrivals in Morocco saw a year-on-year increase of 8 percent in July, the Moroccan Ministry of Tourism said on Monday. Between January and July, over 6.5 million tourists visited the North African kingdom, the ministry indicated in a statement. Tourists from Germany were up by 11 percent, followed by Netherlands with an increase of 7 percent, and Spain and Italy of 6 percent, it reported. The country also witnessed a continuous surge in the emerging tourist markets, with Chinese...
(Xinhuanet 09/18/17)
Some 1.2 million people suffer from undernourishment in Morocco, which represents 3.5 percent of the total population, local media reported on Sunday. Citing the United Nations report on the State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World, the Moroccan daily L'Economiste said undernourishment has significantly declined in the kingdom. Morocco contains the least proportion of undernourished in North Africa, followed by Egypt 4.5 percent, Algeria 4.6, Tunisia by five percent and Sudan by 25.6. After steadily declining for over a decade, global hunger appears to be on the rise, affecting 11 percent of the global population, the report indicates.
(The Guardian 09/18/17)
Anna Jones says that, through selling its cocoa cheaply, Africa is exporting its wealth overseas; while Sue Banford claims that the soya moratorium in the Amazon has done nothing to halt deforestation. Only the final paragraph in your article on cocoa farming causing deforestation in Ivory Coast (Forests pay price for world’s taste for cocoa, 14 September) mentioned the most fundamental thing – the farmer’s livelihood, or lack of it. The low value of his (or more likely her) crop...
(Bloomberg 09/15/17)
Societe Generale SA, challenged on its home turf by Orange SA’s push into banking, is fighting back with a new mobile lender in Africa. The French lender started YUP, a new app for smartphones, in Senegal and Ivory Coast and plans to begin operating in four other sub-Saharan countries this year and next, the company said on Thursday. The bank aims to double its client base to 2 million in the region within three years. “Telcos have opened the way...
(AFP (eng) 09/13/17)
Media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF) voiced alarm Wednesday after a Moroccan court increased the prison sentence of a journalist to one year for inciting an unauthorised protest. Hamid El Mahdaoui, who heads the Badil online news site, was arrested in July at the start of a banned demonstration in the restive northern city of Al-Hoceima. He was initially sentenced to three months in jail after being found guilty of helping to organise "an unauthorised march" and having "invited" others...
(AFP (eng) 09/13/17)
Tunisia's presidency on Tuesday expressed its regret over the expulsion of Morocco's Prince Moulay Hicham, first cousin of King Mohammed VI, but did not explain why he had been deported. The prince was expelled from Tunisia Friday after arriving to attend an academic conference organised by Stanford University on the political transition in Tunisia after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising. "The president of the republic is exasperated by what happened to researcher (Prince Moulay) Hicham Al-Aloui and his expulsion from Tunisian territory," presidency spokeswoman Saida Garrach wrote on Facebook. Garrach said the prince was deported "according to automatic administrative procedures without being referred to officials...
(AFP (eng) 09/13/17)
Edouard Kunz knows timekeeping is important but the former Swiss watch precision mechanic admits that James Bond's Oriental Desert Express in remote eastern Morocco never runs on schedule. The train, made famous in the 2015 Bond movie "Spectre", trundles tourists between the town of Oujda and the former mining city of Bouarfa along a 350-kilometre-long (215-mile) stretch of desert. "It takes between eight and 12 hours to make the trip, sometimes even more," says Kunz, 70, who is known as...
(Xinhuanet 09/13/17)
In an effort to promote economic development and solve complex conservation challenges facing world heritage sites, the African World Heritage Fund Patron and former President of Namibia Hifikepunye Pohamba will host a business leader's breakfast event in Namibian Capital, Windhoek on Thursday. The African World Heritage Fund is an initiative of the African Member States of the African Union and UNESCO, launched in 2006. Webber Ndoro, executive director of the African World Heritage Fund, at a media briefing on Tuesday...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/12/17)
Olympic boxing’s governing body, AIBA, has banned African confederation head Kelani Bayor for three years for allegedly provoking the crowd at the continental championships in Brazzaville last June. Bayor is an AIBA vice-president and executive committee member as well as chairman of Togo’s national Olympic committee. “The Disciplinary Commission found that a hostile and threatening reaction to AIBA officials by spectators after the result of a bout on the last day of the competition was exacerbated by comments from Mr...
(AFP (eng) 09/11/17)
Morocco's Prince Moulay Hicham, King Mohammed VI's first cousin, said on Saturday he had been expelled from Tunisia on the day he arrived to attend an academic conference. "Policemen came to my hotel shortly after my arrival yesterday (Friday) and I was taken to the airport," the prince told AFP. Moulay Hicham, who lives in the United States, had travelled to Tunisia for a conference organised by Stanford University on the political transition in Tunisia after the 2011 Arab Spring...
(Bloomberg 09/11/17)
The South African companies that dominate the U.K.’s growing private hospital industry are counting on more people like Katie Corrie. A children’s party entertainer, Corrie opted to use 13,000 pounds ($17,000) of her savings and inheritance to get a hip replacement rather than spend months on a National Health Service waiting list. Britons like her are forking out almost 1 billion pounds a year to cover their own medical expenses, a trend that’s giving at least one industry the scope...
(APA 09/08/17)
Deprivation and marginalization, underpinned by weak governance, are primary forces driving young Africans into violent extremism, according to a comprehensive new study by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the first study of its kind. Based on interviews with 495 voluntary recruits to extremist organizations such as Al-Shabaab and Boko Haram, the new study also found that it is often perceived state violence or abuse of power that provides the final tipping point for the decision to join an extremist...

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