Friday 19 January 2018
(BBC News Africa 01/10/14)
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is expected to pledge more than $14bn (£8.5bn) in aid and trade deals during his week-long visit to Africa. He is also hoping to secure energy resources and increase exports. Mr Abe's first stop is Oman, before he visits three fast-growing economies - Ethiopia, Ivory Coast and Mozambique. BBC Africa Business Report's Lerato Mbele says the visit is seen as a step by Japan to compete with China, in the new scramble for African resources. In Ethiopia, he is to announce plans for a geo-thermal plant, which reinforces the country's growing renewable energy profile. Mozambique recently made huge gas and coal discoveries and Japan is one of many investors scouting deals there. Although Ivory Coast...
(Leadership 01/10/14)
In less than 24 hours, African football stars will kick off the CHAN tournament, which is meant for footballers plying their trade in the African continent. Africa has always produced some of the finest footballers of different generations, such as Roger Milla, Abedi Pele, Jay Jay Okocha, Nwankwo Kanu, Didier Drogba, Samuel Eto'o, Fredrick Kanoute, Michael Essien, Mikel Obi, Yaya Toure, Vincent Enyeama and the list goes on. These players have graced the European football with African flair, power and strength and have achieved success, fame and fortune. Belowis a list of players from the African continent, which includeone Congolese, one Togolese, one Cameroonian, two Nigerians, two Ghanaians, two Malians, and three Ivoirians, who have been on top of their...
(BBC News Africa 01/10/14)
China and Japan are criticising each other's policies in Africa as each country pledges more money for the continent. Japan has suggested China is buying off African leaders with lavish gifts. Meanwhile China accuses Japan of courting African support for a place on the United National Security Council. Japan's leader Shinzo Abe is touring three nations in Africa, the first trip there by a Japanese prime minister for eight years. Mr Abe is expected to pledge more than $14bn in aid and trade deals during his trip to Ethiopia, Ivory Coast and Mozambique. China has hailed Africa a "golden ground" for foreign investment and has pledged to double its aid to the continent to $20bn a year. Continue reading the...
(Addis Standard 01/09/14)
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is to visit three African countries: Ethiopia, Mozambique and Ivory Coast, as well as the Gulf state of Oman for a week starting from tomorrow, Japanese ministry of foreign affairs said. PM Abe is expected to hold bilateral talks with the leaders of the countries. In addition to that PM Abe is scheduled to give a policy speech on Japan's Africa diplomacy in Ethiopia. In Oman PM Abe is scheduled to hold talks with Sultan Qaboos bin Said and sign an investment pact between the two countries. PM Abe's visit follows the Fifth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD V) held in June 2013 discussed issues, among others, trade and investment and peace and...
(Xinhua 01/09/14)
Johannesburg — When the corpses of migrants are discovered in the desert, floating at sea, or in airless container trucks, the official response often includes calls to take action against the smugglers. Following the deaths of over 300 migrants who drowned trying to cross the Mediterranean in October 2013, for example, Italy's integration minister, Cecile Kyenge, declared, "Behind these tragedies ... there are human traffickers who are enriching themselves on the backs of people who are fleeing war and hunger," and urged increased patrols to target people smugglers. Statements like Kyenge's reflect the widely held perception that "human trafficker" and "people smuggler" can be used interchangeably to describe shadowy criminal networks preying on desperate and naïve people. The small number...
( 01/08/14)
Johannesburg — When the corpses of migrants are discovered in the desert, floating at sea, or in airless container trucks, the official response often includes calls to take action against the smugglers. Following the deaths of over 300 migrants who drowned trying to cross the Mediterranean in October 2013, for example, Italy's integration minister, Cecile Kyenge, declared, "Behind these tragedies ... there are human traffickers who are enriching themselves on the backs of people who are fleeing war and hunger," and urged increased patrols to target people smugglers. Statements like Kyenge's reflect the widely held perception that "human trafficker" and "people smuggler" can be used interchangeably to describe shadowy criminal networks preying on desperate and naïve people. The small number...
(CNN 01/06/14)
(CNN) -- Thousands of African migrants cram into Rabin Square in Tel Aviv, Israel, calling for a labor strike. Their chants fill the air, summing up their message: "We need asylum." Activists estimate more than 50,000 migrants work illegally in low-paying jobs in Israel. Many are fleeing persecution from war-torn areas like Sudan and Eritrea. The threat to their lives pushes them to undertake the dangerous journey via smugglers' routes to Israel. A vast majority cross the Sinai Peninsula, known for being a hotbed of kidnapping and organ harvesting. Once across the border in Israel, they try to claim asylum. "All of us are fleeing genocide, fleeing dictatorship regimes. Looking for protection," says the African Refugee Development Center's Mutasim Ali,...
(Reuters (Eng) 01/06/14)
TEL AVIV (Reuters) - Thousands of African migrants, many holding banners demanding freedom for compatriots jailed by Israel, protested on Sunday in a Tel Aviv square against a new open-ended detention law which allows migrants to be sent to a desert prison. The protests prompted a rare and strongly worded statement from the U.N. refugee agency, saying that Israel's incarceration of migrants, including family breadwinners, caused "hardship and suffering" and was "not in line with" a 1951 world treaty on the treatment of refugees. Human rights groups say more than 300 people have been arrested since the law, which allows authorities to detain migrants without valid visas indefinitely, was passed by Israel's parliament three weeks ago. Dozens more have been...
(AFP (eng) 01/06/14)
TEL AVIV, January 6, 2014 (AFP) - Thousands of African asylum seekers demonstrated outside Western embassies in Tel Aviv on Monday in a second day of mass protests against Israel's immigration policies. The migrants, primarily from Eritrea and Sudan, marched from downtown Tel Aviv to the embassies, calling for help in the face of Israel's refusal to give them refugee status and its detention without trial of hundreds of asylum seekers. A police spokesman said the march by some 10,000 migrants was coordinated with police and there were no disturbances. Under legislation passed on December 10, authorities can detain illegal immigrants entering Israel for up to a year without trial. A sprawling detention facility has been opened in the Negev...
(The Guardian 01/06/14)
Weak leadership and rivalry between states have hampered African efforts to bring security to the conflict-hit continent. The retired French general Vincent Desportes told the BBC World Service last week that France should back political change in Mali and remain in the country as long as necessary. In the Central African Republic (CAR), the current deployment of 1,600 French troops is insufficient: at least 5,000 are needed, Desportes said. No one batted an eyelid. Yet a decade ago, such statements would have been denounced as outrageous imperialist ambition to re-colonise Africa. So what has changed? From Mali to Somalia, the continent has been convulsed by an arc of conflict. Consider the most recent wars, in CAR and South Sudan. Médecins...
(RFI 01/04/14)
Oil theft in the Niger Delta, 'segregation ' in Islam and a plan to outlaw big handbags in Kenya are all topics in today's African papers. Nigeria's ThisDay reports sharp fall in oil theft in the Niger Delta from 100,000 barrels per day to 40,000 barrels per day. The disclosure was made according to the paper by Delta state governor Emmanuel Uduaghan after an audience with President Goodluck Jonathan in Abuja. ThisDay quotes the governor as saying that more than 300 pipelines shut down after being damaged by thieves have been repaired and reopened while sophisticated security measures have been installed to track down on bunkering. Vanguard makes an interesting contribution to the raging debate about "segregation" in Islam sparked...
(The Star 01/04/14)
Africa has 10 per cent of the world's known reserves of oil, 40 per cent of its gold, and 80 to 90 per cent of the chromium and the platinum metal group, to list only a few. But a number of commentators still refer to this wealth of natural resources and minerals as "Africa's curse." They associate the many wars, poverty and untold suffering of ordinary Africans to this abundance. It is true that the abundance of natural resources has been the catalyst for wars and conflict. But should an abundance of natural resources lead to Africa's decline? The answer must surely be a resounding no. Recent literature on the 'Resource Curse and Dutch Disease ' suggest that the real...
(Le Mag 01/03/14)
Rabat- Les détenus islamistes de la prison locale de Bourkaiz à Fès ont décidé d’arrêter leur grève de la faim suite à l’intervention de l’administration pénitentiaire, annonce jeudi un communiqué de la Délégation générale à l’Administration pénitentiaire et à la réinsertion. “Suite aux contacts entre l’administration et les détenus islamistes de la prison locale de Bourkaiz à Fès, ces derniers ont décidé d’arrêter leur grève de la faim”, lit-on dans le communiqué.
(BBC News Africa 01/03/14)
More than 300 migrants have been saved from rough waters in separate incidents off the coasts of Italy and Greece. The Italian navy said it picked up 233 people, mostly from African countries, who had been stuck in an "overcrowded" vessel south of Sicily. Meanwhile Greek coast guards rescued 85 migrants off the island of Astypalaia. Every year thousands of African and Arab migrants fleeing war and poverty risk their lives trying to reach the Europe. Greece and Italy are both main entry points for those who attempt to make the dangerous sea crossing. In October more than 400 people drowned in two shipwrecks near the Italian island of Lampedusa. Many of them were from Eritrea and Somalia, but the...
(Ips News 01/03/14)
For the few plant breeders in Africa like Vivian Oduro, working for an international research institution is an obvious choice, with prestige and benefits any agricultural scientist would find hard to decline. But Oduro - a sweet potato breeder - is staying put. She will use her expertise in Africa for the farmers with whom she now shares a special bond because she understands their challenges intimately. A PhD student at the prestigious West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI) in the Ghanaian capital, Oduro is part of a group of new thinkers in crop breeding who see fresh opportunities in Africa. "Working overseas is attractive, but so is Africa when you understand what needs to be done," Oduro told...
(UKzambians 01/02/14)
The China-Africa Development Fund, the nation’s largest equity fund focused on African investments, will raise another $2 billion in 2014 to boost the continent’s agricultural and steel sectors and upgrade its industrial development. Chi Jianxin, president of the fund, said China has been looking to invest in different ways in Africa instead of focusing only on building infrastructure projects such as roads, bridges, ports and cement plants. The fund became operational in 2007, with a target of raising $5 billion. It raised an initial $1 billion, with a second tranche of $2 billion being contributed by the China Development Bank in 2012. “With a large number of young workers and abundant natural resources, African countries have good opportunities to capitalize...
(Reuters (Eng) 01/02/14)
ROME Thu Jan 2, 2014 (Reuters) - The Italian navy has rescued 233 mostly African migrants from a 10 meter (yard) boat in Mediterranean waters south of Sicily as the immigration crisis that killed hundreds in shipwrecks in 2013 showed no signs of letting up in the new year. The navy picked them up in choppy seas late on Wednesday and was ferrying them on Thursday to a port near Syracuse on Sicily's eastern coast, a statement said. On board were men and women from Eritrea, Nigeria, Somalia, Zambia and Mali as well as from Pakistan, the navy said. Sea arrivals to Italy from Northern Africa more than tripled in 2013, fuelled by refugees from Syria's civil war and political...
(Voice of America 01/02/14)
Researchers had developed the first non-invasive method of detecting malaria infection using a laser beam scanner. The painless test appears to be 100 percent accurate and does not require using any blood.Currently, the gold standard of malaria testing is examining a blood smear under the microscope for evidence of the deadly parasite. A diagnosis requires trained technicians, expensive equipment and time, things that are not always available in poorer and more remote parts of the world. But so-called "vapor nanobubble" technology would eliminate the need to draw any blood. It only requires an individual to place a finger on a laser device, according to Dmitri Lopotko, a researcher with the department of biochemistry and cell biology at Rice University in...
(Dw-World 01/02/14)
After crossing numerous hurdles to reach Europe, many refugees from Africa think their arrival on European soil is the end to their struggles. They soon realise that many more challenges still lie ahead. 20 year-old Sara Mohamed sits in a class with ten other young refugees. Today's lesson is German. Wearing a long, dark headscarf, Sara jokes, laughs heartily and gives the correct answer to questions posed by the teacher. Looking at her, you would not know what she has been through to be in Germany today. At the age of 15 Sara left her home country Somalia to embark on a long and dangerous journey. "I was very young and it was very hard for me but it is...
(AL Jazeera 12/31/13)
The African Union has threatened targeted sanctions against those inciting the violence in South Sudan and hampering international efforts to negotiate an end to the two-week outburst of fighting that risks drawing in the wider region. At a meeting in Gambia in West Africa, the AU said late on Monday it was dismayed by the bloodletting that has already killed more than a thousand people in the world's youngest country. "(Council) expresses its intention to take appropriate measures, including targeted sanctions, against all those who incite violence, including along ethnic lines, continue hostilities (and) undermine the envisaged inclusive dialogue," the AU's Peace and Security Council said. On Tuesday South Sudanese troops fought rebels believed to be loyal to former Vice...

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