Saturday 27 May 2017
(AFP (eng) 12/29/16)
Sheltering from rain in a small tent, Titus Albaosui is trying to escape the fighting between government troops and rebel forces raging across central Mozambique and raising fears of civil war. This year has seen a sharp escalation in violence, and more than 15,000 people have been forced to flee to government-run camps, relatives' homes or across the border to Malawi and Zimbabwe. The clashes between longtime rivals, the Frelimo government and Renamo, an armed insurgent group and also an elected opposition party, have revived the spectre of Mozambique's civil war that ended more than 20 years ago. "There is a war there -- we could no longer live in our homes," said Albaosui, a 24-year-old farmer who left almost...
(AFP (eng) 12/29/16)
French border police intercepted 45 African migrants who were trying to enter the country from Italy and arrested the two smugglers involved, local prosecutors said Wednesday. Travelling in two vans, 25 migrants in the first vehicle were stopped while 20 in the second breached a checkpoint at Montgenevre in southeastern France, before later being found. According to the prosecutor's office, the migrants were returned to the border and the two smugglers are to be tried in Italy.
(Reuters (Eng) 12/28/16)
Mozambique's Renamo opposition party will cease all military operations against government forces for the next seven days to allow the public to enjoy New Year festivities, its leader Afonso Dhlakama said on Tuesday. Rights groups estimate that dozens of people have been killed this year in tit-for-tat attacks between Renamo fighters and the ruling Frelimo government. Renamo and Frelimo fought on opposing sides in a civil war from 1976 to 1992 in which a million people died. Mozambique is on the verge of developing huge offshore gas reserves which could transform one of the world's poorest countries into a middle-income state. Competition to control this newfound wealth could stir unrest, analysts say. “I announce the provisional cessation of military hostilities...
(APA 12/28/16)
Mozambique's National Institute of Meteorology has warned of the possibility of a powerful storm accompanied by high winds in the southern region of the country on Thursday, APA can report. An INAM media statement emailed to APA on Wednesday says the heavy downpour may reach more than 50 millimeters and the phenomenon will affect the districts of Matutuíne, Boane, Namaacha, Marracuene, Manhiça, Moamba, Magude, in the province of Maputo and the cities of Matola and Maputo. In the southern province of Gaza, the effects of this storm are exoected to be felt in the districts of Bilene, Chókwè, Massingir, Mabalane, Guijá, Chicualacuala, Mandlakazi, Chibuto and the provincial capital, Xai-Xai. The districts of Zavala, Panda, Jangamo and Inharrime will also be...
(AFP (eng) 12/28/16)
Its lower cost has made it popular in commercial food production, but after being blamed for deforestation in Asia, palm oil plantations are now getting a similar rap in Africa. The sheer scale of land required is having an impact in Gabon, Cameroon and the Congo Basin, environmentalists say. With financing coming from American, European and Asian agri-businesses, palm bunches are cultivated then cut from trees and sent to factories where oil is extracted by hot pressing. But the production process accelerates deforestation, contributes to climate change and threatens fauna and flora in vulnerable areas, opponents argue. However the companies say that palm oil is not only less expensive than soya or sunflower oil but requires much less land to...
(The Herald Online 12/27/16)
The end of 2016 provides an opportunity to take stock of Africa’s recent economic performance and future prospects. It’s been a tumultuous year for some African countries largely due to a commodities crisis and a global economic slowdown.Yet there were still pockets of good growth which displayed the huge potential of the African continent. And 2017 looks to be the year the countries hardest hit by the crisis seek to recover from the economic reversals of the past few years. Since the start of the new millennium average economic growth across Africa has been stronger than the global growth rate. Growth across the continent averaged 5 percent. This fuelled the “Africa Rising” narrative that permeated public discourse. Among the growth...
(Reuters (Eng) 12/24/16)
A record 5,000 migrants are believed to have drowned in the Mediterranean Sea this year, following two shipwrecks on Thursday in which some 100 people, mainly West Africans, were feared dead, aid agencies said on Friday. Two overcrowded inflatable dinghies capsized in the Strait of Sicily after leaving Libya for Italy, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the U.N. refugee agency UNHCR said. "Those two incidents together appear to be the numbers that would bring this year's total up to over to 5,000 (deaths), which is a new high that we have reported during this crisis," IOM spokesman Joel Millman told a Geneva briefing. The Italian coast guard rescued survivors and had recovered eight bodies so far, he said...
(Independent Online 12/23/16)
According to Zimbabwe’s vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa, security services, including the army, are on alert along the eastern border after a man was abducted from his village and later killed in Mozambique. There have been other skirmishes along the border with armed bandits who Mnangagwa said were loyal to the Renamo party which has long had strength along this part of the border area, about 80kms south of provincial capital, Mutare. The dead man who was abducted has not yet been identified, but in a separate incident, about 50 cattle were taken from small farmers and pushed across the border.
(The Globe and Mail 12/23/16)
The Square Kilometre Array will be the world’s most powerful radio telescope, opening new frontiers in our understanding of the universe. But the builders have to contend with an unforgiving climate and other formidable challenges first, In the desolate rocky plains of the Great Karoo, the dangers are endless. Scorpions and puff adders are underfoot. The harsh sun beats down, interrupted only by occasional lightning storms. Temperatures range from stifling heat to freezing cold. But at night, in the vast empty darkness, the stars are impossibly bright and clear. And it is the stars that have lured a Canadian-backed project to build the world’s most powerful radio telescope, with the potential to unlock the deepest secrets of the universe. For...
(APA 12/22/16)
Mozambique's former President Joaquim Chissano, has expressed his readiness to help in the process of dialogue for the restoration of effective peace in Mozambique between the government and the main opposition Renamo party, if requested, APA can report on Thursday. “I am available to help in the mediation process if requested, Renamo wants to come to power without observing democratic norms and it cannot impose its will to the detriment of other political actors,” Chissano is quoted by the local media on Thursday. Chissano, a former revolutionary who fought Portuguese colonial rule, served as president of the southern African country from 1986 until 2005, winning praise for his pragmatic policies in a nation once
(APA 12/22/16)
The United Kingdom and the Global Alliance for Nutrition Improvement (GAIN) have signed in Maputo an agreement to fund a £7.7 million program to empower private sector participation in the expansion of nutrition in Mozambique - Scaling Up Nutrition in Mozambique (SUN), APA learns here Thursday. A media statement from the British High Commission in Mozambique emailed to APA says the agreement will help GAIN Mozambique develop the SUN Business Network on a pioneering multi-sectoral platform to mobilize the private sector to invest in improving nutrition in Mozambique . “This initiative will support the Mozambican Government's ambitions described in the Multi-Sectoral Plan for the Reduction of Chronic Malnutrition (2011-2020) to reduce chronic malnutrition through the growth of a sustainable market...
(APA 12/22/16)
A court in Mozambique's capital, Maputo has jailed a 29 -year old man, Armando Manasses to 31 years in prison and two of his accomplices to 29 years, after being found guilty of murdering his own parents in the Matola municipality, a satellite industrial city situated 15 kilometres southwest of Maputo. In delivering the verdict late on Wednesday, Presiding judge, Berta Zitha, explained that the sentences do not give the right to parole and the defendants should still compensate the family in the amount of $480. The court also jailed his accomplices, Abel Mula, 20 years old and 21-year old Hélio Mondlane for their part in the crime. This is the first case of a heavy homicide case in Mozambique...
(AFP (eng) 12/22/16)
Selma saunters on her stilt-like legs, batting thick lashes as she extends a blackish tongue -- as long as an arm -- to grab pellets offered by an awed tourist. The giraffe is after all, eating for two. Her pregnancy is good news for one of the rarest giraffe species, protected at the Giraffe Centre in the Kenyan capital, but experts warn the outlook for the rest of the world's tallest land mammals is far gloomier. While it is hoped the shocking news that the gentle giants of the African savannah are facing extinction will spur action, conservationists largely have their hands tied as many giraffe live in Africa's most conflict-torn regions. Somalia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan...
(APA 12/21/16)
The Mozambican Association of Bakers (AMOPAO) has threatened to raise the price of bread early next year due to what it described as "insufficient" subsidy paid by the government. AMOPAO chairperson Victor Miguel told journalists in Maputo on Wednesday that the bakers were not happy with the support they are receiving from the government to cushion them from rising costs. "The flour subsidy is not having the desired effect. The costs are high and now we are facing enormous difficulties to pay wages and even to buy flour, he said after a meeting of the bakers in Maputo to discuss the closure of several bakeries by government inspectors on the grounds that their poor hygiene was a threat to public...
(The Citizen 12/21/16)
Tanzania is among some African countries which may see a drop in development aid as the US is likely to expand fiscal stance and cut spending during Donald Trump's presidency, a new report shows. The move by the world's largest economy will affect dependent countries such as Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria and DRC according to the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) latest report released in London yesterday. In its Economic Insight: Africa Q4 2016, the accountancy and finance body points out that signs of an expansionary fiscal stance under the Trump administration coupled with spending cuts to accommodate increased infrastructure expenditure are likely to lead to the decrease in aid. "Aid is one of the main...
(APA 12/20/16)
China has agreed to provide Mozambique with military technical assistance, including training, equipment and accessories worth about US$11.5 million. The agreement, which was signed on Monday by the Mozambican Defence Minister Salvador Mtumuke and Chinese ambassador Su Jian, aims to improve the mobility and equipping capacity of the Mozambican military to respond to current challenges. Mtumuke said the agreement "advocates the construction and equipping of the Protection Regiment and strengthens the bonds of friendship and fraternity among the armed forces of our countries." He said the pact was the result of a visit by Mozambican President Filipe Nyusi to China in May this year. Su said the agreement fits into the concept defined by his country as an integral part...
(Bloomberg 12/20/16)
Mozambique has further cut electricity supplies to South Africa’s utility after a fault at the Cahora Bassa hydropower dam, the sub-Saharan region’s biggest. Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd. is receiving 900 megawatts of power from the dam out of a possible 1,300 megawatts because of a fault at one of the turbines, the Johannesburg-based company said in reply to e-mailed questions. That’s a drop from the 1,150 megawatts Cahora Bassa had already reduced supplies to because of falling water levels at the dam. The fault “has resulted in one of the Cahora Bassa generators being out of service,” Eskom said Tuesday. “It is expected to return in late January. While it does reduce Eskom’s supply capacity, it is not sufficient to...
(APA 12/20/16)
United Kingdom-based Gemfields says it raised US$30.4 million at an auction in Singapore of rough rubies from its mine in Mozambique’s Montepuez district. Gemfields chief executive Ian Harebottle said in a statement on Tuesday that his firm was pleased with the results of its seventh Montepuez ruby auction “despite some of our customers being unable to attend while they adjust to the regional demonetisation policy changes they've experienced over the past few weeks.” The changes he referred to were in apparent reference to a controversial decision by the Indian government to remove large denomination banknotes from circulation. According to Gemfields, all the proceeds from the latest auction would be repatriated to Mozambique, with royalties and taxes being paid to the...
(AFP (eng) 12/20/16)
When Rose Kariuki first felt a lump on her left breast, the spectre of cancer -- a disease she had only heard of on television -- was the last thing on her mind. "To me, cancer was nowhere near us. It was shocking, I feared death, I feared so many things," the 46-year-old Kenyan school teacher told AFP. Rose is one of a growing number of Africans suffering from cancer, one of the lifestyle diseases -- along with diabetes and heart problems -- proving increasing deadly on the continent. A World Health Organisation (WHO) survey released Tuesday showed that most Africans had at least one risk factor for developing one of these diseases, such as smoking, a lack of exercise,...
(Bloomberg 12/19/16)
Mozambique’s metical is stabilizing and the inflation rate is forecast to drop after an aggressive rate hike by the central bank in October, according to Governor Rogerio Zandamela. “The most recent information reported in the last quarter of the year is more encouraging,” Zandamela told reporters Monday in the capital, Maputo. “We noted that monetary adjustment has begun to produce the desired effects.” Inflation, which accelerated to 26.8 percent in November, will probably quicken to 27 percent by the end of the year, then begin a decline in 2017, said Zandamela, a former International Monetary Fund employee who’s been

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