Saturday 27 May 2017
(Voice of America 12/16/16)
Several civil society organizations are calling for a return to justice in Mozambique following a series of killings targeting lawyers and judges in the country. Carlos Mondlane, president of the Mozambican Association of Judges, said that in recent years, criminals have tried to intimidate and silence the justice system through attacks against judges and lawyers. Another group, the Mozambican Human Rights League, said the killings were going unsolved because of police indiscipline, corruption and an absence of professional ethics. The most recent examples of assassinations of jurists included the killings of Giles Cistac, a French-Mozambican lawyer shot in Maputo in 2015
(AFP (eng) 12/16/16)
The number of migrants feared to have died this year has soared to nearly 7,200 -- a more than 20-percent increase over 2015 -- with most of the fatalities in the Mediterranean, IOM said Friday. In total, 7,189 migrants and refugees have died or remain missing on migratory routs around the world, the International Organization for Migration said. That number is already 1,449 more than in all of 2015. And since it represents an average of 20 deaths per day, another 200 to 300 people could perish by the end of the year if the trend continues, the Geneva-based IOM warned in a statement. The Mediterranean Sea routes, used so far this year by nearly 360,000 people seeking a new...
(Macauhub 12/15/16)
The Pequenos Libombos dam, in Mozambique, has stopped providing irrigation water to agricultural companies in order to ensure a supply of water to the population. The announcement was made by the Minister of Public Works, Housing and Water Resources, Carlos Bonete Martinho, after a visit to the dam that receives water from the Umbelúzi treatment plant and supplies the cities of Maputo, Matola and the Boane district. The lack of water is a result of a drought affecting seven provinces of Mozambique, namely in the south of the country since the beginning of 2016. The minister said that the dam discharge is currently three cubic
(Macauhub 12/15/16)
The works of the second phase of the refurbishment and expansion of the Port of Nacala, in Nampula, Mozambique, is due to begin in March next year, in order to increase the port’s capacity to handle cargo in transit, especially for Malawi and Zambia. Estimated to cost US$400 million, funded by the governments of Mozambique and Japan, the works will increase the number of parks for containers and the installation of new equipment. Luis Machado, head of operations for port company Empresa Portos do Norte, which manages the port of Nacala, told daily newspaper Noticias the work should be completed by 2020. Studies by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) report that when the works are completed, the Port of...
(CNN 12/15/16)
In the sleepy, sun-blasted town of De Aar in central South Africa, a mighty force is stirring. The largest solar plant in Africa, Middle East and the Southern hemisphere was inaugurated here earlier this year, a 175-megawatt facility that spreads over almost 500 hectares. The facility is the brainchild of Solar Capital, led by hotel magnate turned solar evangelist Paschal Phelan, which ploughed $400 million into the venture. The plant supplies power to the National Grid, but when the heat is fiercest it produces far more than the Grid can use, and the excess power goes to waste. "It's like you have a Ferrari and you run a small car," says Massimiliano Salaorno, plant manager of Solar Capital De Aar...
(Bloomberg 12/14/16)
Sharply falling water levels at Mozambique’s Cahora Bassa dam, sub-Saharan Africa’s biggest hydropower plant, are threatening electricity supplies to countries including South Africa, which buys about a third of its output. Levels are the lowest Phil Bezuidenhout, a lodge owner at the dam, has seen in the 24 years he’s operated on its shores in the country’s northwest. “This is definitely the lowest it’s been in my time,” he said by phone. “These levels are ridiculously low.” Southern Africa’s worst drought in 35 years has cut inflows from rivers including the Zambezi and prompted Zambia and Zimbabwe to last year more than halve power production at the Kariba dam, which is upstream from Cahora Bassa. Levels at the Mozambican reservoir...
(AFP (eng) 12/14/16)
Family planning helps people in Africa to be healthier and wealthier, as women without contraceptives become locked in "a cycle of poverty," Melinda Gates told AFP as a conference on the topic was held in Ivory Coast. "When a woman has access to contraceptives she can lift herself out of poverty, and if she doesn't have access to contraceptives, it locks her inside a cycle of poverty for the rest of her life," said the wife of Microsoft co-founder and billionaire Bill Gates, whose foundation is very active in the field. Family planning has "huge health benefits for the woman and for her children, and it has economic benefits," Gates told AFP by telephone from the Ivorian economic capital Abidjan...
(APA 12/13/16)
Mozambique's Cahora Bassa Dam has reduced electricity supply by 18 percent following a technical fault on a generator, the company that operates the facility announced on Tuesday. Hidroelctrica de Cahora Bassa (HCB) said in a statement that the breakdown was caused by the rupture of insulation material that occurred last week. It said a technical team from the company was deployed to the site and would need at least 70 days to effect repairs. HCB is majority owned by the Mozambican government that controls 85 percent of the shares. The company exports 60 percent of its power to South African power utility Eskom and 35 percent to the Zimbabwe Electricity Supply Authority. The balance is used locally. Cahora Bassa Dam,...
(AFP (eng) 12/13/16)
The cocktails keep flowing by the pool on the tourist strip, but in The Gambia's markets many African migrant traders are packing up their businesses and heading home. The international community is piling pressure on President Yahya Jammeh to leave power after 22 years and hand over to opposition leader Adama Barrow, who won an election two weeks ago only for Jammeh to later reverse his original concession of defeat. Of the economy's two main sources of investment from abroad, tourism appears to be weathering the country's political storm far better than the thousands of petty traders who move to The Gambia from the rest of west Africa. President-elect Barrow told AFP on Monday claims that tourist numbers could be...
(Le Monde 12/09/16)
Dozens of politicians, diplomats, military and intelligence chiefs, members of the opposition and leading business figures were wiretapped across the continent. This rare overview of modern satellite espionage could hardly be less technical and abstract, for it not only names the victims of intercepts but also reveals the scale of a surveillance operation spanning an entire continent. That continent is Africa. New documents shown to Le Monde, in collaboration with The Intercept, from the data cache of the former NSA (National Security Agency) operative Edward Snowden, originally given to Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, offer unprecedented insight into information on twenty African countries collected by GCHQ, the British intelligence service, between 2009 and 2010. Dozens of lists of intercepts examined...
(APA 12/07/16)
Mozambique's Minister of Economy and Finance, Adriano Maleiane says the government faces a $1.2 billion budget deficit for 2017, which he said is a challenge, given that all 14 donors and funding agencies who used to provide direct budget support suspended all further contributions last April, in the wake of the scandal involving up to $2 billion worth of state guaranteed loans. Maleiane was speaking Wednesday when he presented in parliament the state budget for 2017 of $3.5 billion. Maleiane said he expected the deficit to be covered mostly by foreign and domestic loans while the foreign grants are expected to shrink to just over
(APA 12/07/16)
The Prime Minister of Mozambique, carlos Agostinho do Rosario has predicted annual economic growth of 5.5 per cent in 2017 pushed by the extractive industry, APA can report on Wednesday. Presenting the Mozambican government’s Economic and Social Plan for 2017 to parliament on Wednesday, Do Rosario said the extractive industry’s forecast growth rate of 24 per cent when compared with an estimated 13.2 per cent this year, the 5.5 percent growth rate is achievable. The target growth rate for 2016 was seven per cent and although the final figures are not yet available, the current forecast is that growth this year has slumped to 3.9 per cent, with more than 11 million tonnes projected for 2017. The Prime Minister said...
(Independent Online 12/07/16)
JSE-listed Mara Delta, which operates as a property fund, has bought a property in Mozambique for almost R340 million. The property is home to the largest mall in the region and boasts tenants such as Shoprite, and KFC. The company, which has previously expressed its interest in expanding into Mozambique, has done the deal indirectly as its wholly-owned subsidiary, Delta International Mauritius, has bought Gerania - which owns Mall de Tete – from Sericea Holdings and Transformers Investment. Gerania holds 99.9 percent of Mall de Tete, which has the right of use and development of a property in Tete, Mozambique on which the retail shopping centre, known as Mall de Tete, is located. Mall de Tete, which was been developed...
(Reuters (Eng) 12/07/16)
Mozambique's cabinet has approved changes to liquefied natural gas (LNG) contracts with U.S. oil major Anadarko and Italy's Eni to allow the two companies to sell the government's share of gas from projects in the Rovuma Basin. "The government opted to relinquish its right to receive in kind its quota of available gas as well as the gas production tax. The aim is to turn the projects viable," government spokeswoman Ana Coana said late on Tuesday after the amendments were approved by cabinet. "The concessionaires commit themselves to a joint-sale of liquefied natural gas in order to offer huge volumes and get better prices at the market." The contracts relates to Anadarko's Dolphin Tuna project and Eni's South Coral project...
(Reuters (Eng) 12/07/16)
Debt-ridden Mozambique has no chance of meeting its year-end deadline for a restructuring deal, according to investors who are preparing to dig in their heels until the country comes clear on what it owes and to whom. The southern African country, one of the world's poorest, has seen its currency and investor confidence collapse since April, when the International Monetary Fund halted a loan after uncovering previously undisclosed debts that had not been approved by parliament. Mozambique says its debt position is "unsustainable", and wants an urgent restructuring agreement with commercial creditors so a new IMF loan can be approved. Without this, the economy will face a "downward spiral" that would be hard to control, it warned. But creditors insist...
(Reuters (Eng) 12/07/16)
As the darkness falls on the plains around Bunambiyu, a remote village in Tanzania's northern Shinyanga region, Elizabeth Julius switches on her solar lantern to finish sewing clothes for her customers. Not long ago, nightfall would have forced her to close her tailoring shop, or use a smoky kerosene lamp. But with the solar-powered lamp, Julius can now sew for as long as she wants. "Solar energy has entirely changed my life. I use it at work and at home, yet it doesn't cost me anything," said the 29-year-old entrepreneur and mother of two. "I often wake up at night to work because I need the money to support my family," she said. Julius and her husband, Zablon, used to...
(APA 12/06/16)
The Mozambican parliament has approved its own $16 million budget for 2017, with all opposition deputies abstaining and protesting that the Assembly could not do its job properly unless it received more money, APA can report. Three quarters of this sum comes from the 2017 state budget and the remainder from assorted foreign donors and partners such as the European Union, the United Nations Development Programme, and the Westminster Foundation. Opposition deputies from the main political force, Renamo complained that the budget was nowhere near large enough to allow the Assembly to monitor the activities of the government.
(APA 12/06/16)
The Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) says Africa can yield benefits from commodity-based industrialization and agro-alliance with new policy approaches, according to a statement issued here Tuesday. The ECA has on many editions of its annual Economic Report made a push for the developmental state and a return to planning, arguing that the strong role of the state is key to fostering Africa’s structural transformation. The acting ECA Executive Secretary Abdalla Hamdok spoke on the need for new policy approaches to incentivize agricultural production in activities and sectors with higher returns. In his remarks at the opening of the African Economic Conference on the theme, Feeding Africa: Towards Agro-Allied Industrialization for Inclusive Growth, Hamdok said: “Our desire for structural transformation...
(AfricaNews 12/05/16)
Cameroon’s Indomitable Lionesses failed to use home advantage and revenge in the final of the Women African Cup of Nations (AWCON 2016) losing by a goal to Nigeria’s Super Falcons. The Super Falcons thus successfully defended the title they won in 2014 by defeating Cameroon in Namibia. The hosts entered the final aiming to win their first title and avenge two previous defeats by Nigeria. But a late goal by Oparanozie Desire dashed hopes and sent disappointment through the teeming home fans. Desire slotted in from close range after a beautiful lob from team mate Ngozi Okobi hit a Cameroonian defender and fell on her path with six minutes to the end of the game. The remaining duration and three...
(Voice of America 12/02/16)
Activists are using the women's Africa Cup of Nations tournament in Cameroon to campaign for the protection of the continent's forests and animal species. The campaign, called “Sports for Nature," is spearheaded by conservationist groups who say some of Africa's natural resources are on the verge of going extinct. In Yaounde, birds sing at a makeshift park near the Ahmadou Ahidjo stadium, one of the sites of the 2016 women's football African Cup of Nations. Conservationist Nevielle Tanyi points toward a crocodile walking nearby and describes the danger it poses to workers trying to maintain a pond. "When we provoke the crocodile to leave the pond area, it goes toward the side where there is no water and it normally...

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