Tuesday 12 December 2017
(The Namibian 06/06/13)
THE Global Fund has approved a N$986,8 million grant to Namibia for the second phase of the country’s HIV programmes. This development was confirmed by Pandu Hailonga-van Djik, Director of Namibian Global Fund Programme (NGFP) yesterday. “NGFP is very excited to have learnt about the good news on Tuesday. This is a strong response to fight HIV-AIDS, TB and malaria,” Hailonga-van Djik told The Namibian yesterday. The grant will be used for five high-impact interventions which are treatment, care and support, prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT), scaling up voluntary male circumcision, basic prevention packages for men who have sex with men (MSM), sex workers and cross cutting activities such as strategic and targeted behavioral change communication, HIV testing...
(Business Daily 06/06/13)
Japan hosted the fifth meeting of TICAD, the Tokyo International Cooperation on African Development this week. The meeting is a reminder that, while the rest of the world obsesses over Europe’s economic travails, America’s political paralysis and growth slowdown in China and other emerging markets, there remains a region — sub-Saharan Africa — where poverty is almost the rule, not the exception. From 1990 to 2010, the number of people living in poverty ($1.25 per day) across sub-Sahara Africa rose from less than 300 million to nearly 425 million, while the number living on less than $2 a day grew from about 390 million to almost 600 million. Still, the proportion of those living in poverty declined from 57 per...
(The Namibian 06/06/13)
YET again, and quite accurately, our Hon Minister of Trade and Industry, like his several predecessors identified one of Namibia’s strongest areas with growth potential is an access point for trade to our landlocked and other partners in our African environment. We have a solid financial and trade-related commercial systems, ports with talent, resources and potentially good transport routes to make things happen. We have good arrangements for Botswana and Zambia to operate within the Walvis Bay port and access to southern Angola. But that’s where it stops. What we are rapidly eroding is our ability to move goods efficiently and fast as our road, and more significantly our rail systems, are steadily falling apart. And why? As multiple reports...
(New Era 06/05/13)
Grootfontein — As the nation readies itself for the 2014 national elections the Electoral Commission of Namibia (ECN) is concerned that some political parties still do not seem to understand the Electoral Act, which governs elections in the country. ECN returning officer, Frederick Rugharo, said during the Grootfontein by-election that some political parties "do not know their responsibilities during elections, nor the different functions of the election body". "Political parties do not know the Electoral Act, hence you see there were some misunderstandings between political parties and polling officials during the by-election," said the returning officer. Rugharo was disturbed by the fact that some political parties did not even know the functions of the police, election officials and the roles...
(New Era 06/05/13)
Katima Mulilo — Livestock sales could be boosted significantly in the Caprivi Region after the refurbishment of the Katima and Kopano quarantine camps, which cost over N$7 million. The multi-million dollar refurbishment was funded by the Millennium Challenge Account-Namibia (MCA-N) that has so far spent hundreds of millions of dollars in Namibia on tourism, cattle farming, crop farming and education. The upgraded quarantine facilities under the Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry were inaugurated by the Agriculture, Water and Forestry Permanent Secretary Joseph Iita. The upgrading work began in April last year. Iita said since livestock farming contributes significantly to the livelihoods of many residents, it is only befitting that livestock marketing facilities should be improved. "Over 80 percent of...
(Voice of America 06/05/13)
Global hunger, poor nutrition and obesity are costing the world trillions of dollars in health costs and lost productivity, according to a new report from the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). The FAO report says fighting hunger is not enough. Tackling the more complex problem of malnutrition calls for action across the entire food system, from farm to fork. About 870 million people worldwide are hungry, according to the FAO. But malnutrition is about more than just hunger. “Two billion people are deficient in essential vitamins and minerals," said FAO's Kostas Stamoulis. "One child in four under the age of five is stunted. And 1.4 billion people are overweight.” The FAO report says the combined effects of all these...
(The Namibian 06/04/13)
THE voter registration fraud trial of former Director of Elections Philemon Kanime and two co-accused is due to continue in the Windhoek Regional Court in late August. The trial, in which Kanime is facing charges with the former president of the Namibia Bus and Taxi Association, Magnus Nangombe, and a staff member of the Electoral Commission of Namibia, Nico Mingelius, is scheduled to continue from 27 to 30 August, after being postponed on Friday last week. Kanime, Nangombe and Mingelius are charged with a count of fraud, in which it is alleged that in the period of 6 to 19 February 2008 they fraudulently got Nangombe registered as a voter in a local authority election at the Oshikoto Region town...
(New Era 06/04/13)
The Namibia Airports Company (NAC) will soon be upgrading the Walvis Bay Airport at a cost of over N$67 million. The coastal airport is said to have the potential to become a leader in cargo handling and the servicing of the fishing sector. The NAC's spokesperson, Mia Davids, said the tender to upgrade the airport was re-awarded to New Era Investment at the end of September last year. "The airport is in operation at this point in time. The current terminal building will be upgraded, which in essence entails that the old terminal will be retained at the heart of the project, but will be hidden behind a modern concourse expansion. By June 2013, all operations will relocate to the...
(Times of Zambia 06/04/13)
Yokohama — THE three-day fifth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD V) meeting yesterday drew to a close here with participants unanimously adopting the 2013 Yokohama Declaration and Yokohama Action Plan 2013-2017. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who was the co-chairperson of the event, paid tribute to the African leaders who attended the meeting. Mr Abe said at Pacifico Yokohama Conference Centre that Japan wanted to see Africa develop and was determined to help the continent find lasting solutions to its problems. Moving a motion to adopt the two documents, he said Japan would ensure the resolutions of the conference were fully implemented to accelerate development in Africa. The two documents were unanimously adopted by acclamation. He reiterated his...
(New Era 06/04/13)
About one year after the introduction of new bank notes bearing the image of the Founding Father of the Namibian Nation, Dr Sam Nujoma, the Bank of Namibia (BoN) has announced that it is introducing new and improved notes to replace the fast ageing N$10 and N$20 notes. The notes that will be replaced were introduced last year. The problem with the rapidly deteriorating notes has been identified as a technical weakness in paper used specifically for the two denominations and therefore the cost of reprinting will be carried by the company responsible for printing the original notes. During July last year BoN notified the public about the observation that the diamond shape feature on some of the N$10 and...
(New Era 06/03/13)
Windhoek — Namibia stands to benefit from the US$32- billion aid programme promised to Africa for the erection of infrastructure and the training of youth on the continent by the Japanese government. The aid was announced on Saturday during the 5th Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD) in Tokyo. According to various newspaper reports, the programme will give 1 000 young African students opportunities over the next five years to study at universities in Japan and work as interns at Japanese companies. The Minister of Information and Communication Technology Joël Kaapanda who is also the government spokesperson and who is currently in China attending a digitalization workshop, could not shed light on whether Namibia would benefit directly from the...
(Namibian Sun 06/03/13)
Currently Namibia is in the grip of severe drought. Human food security is under threat. It is for this reason that President Hifikepunye Pohamba recently declared a national emergency in the country. According to the report prepared by the World Food Programme for the Office of Prime Minister, the food security situation in communal and resettlement areas of Namibia is dire. The report titled Emergency Food Assessment in Communal and Resettlement Areas of Namibia (May 2013), states that about 30% of households have reduced their number of meals consumed from two to three meals per day to one meal . The report further noted that 46% of households have moderate to poor dietary diversity. Both livestock and crop production have...
(Namibian Sun 06/03/13)
Primary school learner enrolment countrywide has shot by up by over 15 000, following the introduction free Universal Primary Education (UPE), and retired teachers may now be roped in to deal with the influx. The Ministry of Education has also made it crystal clear that UPE funds should not be used for anything else but free education. Kavango Region saw an increase of 3 618 learners enrolled this year, followed by Oshikoto Region with 3 226, Caprivi with 1 536, Khomas with 1 653 and Erongo with1 536 more pupils than the previous academic year. In Ohangwena Region learner enrolment increased by only 186 pupils, while in Karas Region enrolment was up by 383. In the Otjozondjupa Region learner enrolment...
(The Namibian 06/03/13)
THE decision by the Tender Board of Namibia to terminate a N$62 million tender has come back to haunt them after the High Court on Friday ruled that the tender be sent back for re-evaluation. Profile Investments, the company which was initially recommended for the railway tender but was ultimately unsuccessful, challenged the decision by the board, claiming that the Ministry of Works and Transport leaked their information to a rival. Norman Tjombe, the lawyer who represented Profile Investments, told The Namibian yesterday that the court order by Justice Kato van Niekerk says the decision of the Tender Board to cancel the tender is set aside. The tender was for the upgrading of the Aus-Lüderitz railway line. The successful bidder...
(New Era 06/03/13)
Oshakati — The Namibian health sector will only meet one of its four Millennium Development Goals (MDG) by 2015. This was the view expressed by Dr Naftali Hamata, a retired medical doctor who is currently the Special Advisor to the Minister of Health and Social Services, Dr Richard Kamwi. While giving a presentation on the topic of maternal and child mortality in regard to MDGs, Hamata said only four of eight MDGs set by the United Nations are supposed to be met by the health sector in Namibia. However, so far the Namibian health sector only managed to reach the malaria reduction goal and this has placed the country among those countries that have successfully reduced malaria infections. Hamata said...
(Voice of America 06/03/13)
Japan will provide $1 billion in aid over the next five years to northern Africa for economic development and humanitarian efforts, including help with security and counter-terrorism measures. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced the assistance Sunday, on the second day of the three-day Tokyo International Conference on African Development, being held in Yokohama, south of the capital city. The money is part of the $32 billion in government and private-sector aid Abe announced on Saturday. Abe says the investment of public and private funds over the next five years is aimed at helping growth on the continent and encouraging Japanese companies to invest there. The prime minister began targeting Africa for investment opportunities shortly after taking office last year...
(The Namibian 06/01/13)
THE Chief Executive Officer of Agribank, Leonard Iipumbu, has defended the bank's decision to auction a house belonging to a Windhoek woman because she had failed to honour her debt. The house belonged to Maureen Dunn and was sold at an auction last year after she failed to pay her debt with the bank. The Namibian last week reported that Agribank sold Dunn's house, valued at between N$780 000 and N$900 000, to recover a debt of less than N$50 000. Iipumbu said Agribank had given Dunn time to settle her debt or make arrangements with it for six years. He said he did not wish to discuss the client's dealings with the bank but said Dunn's debt to Agribank...
(Voice of America 06/01/13)
The United States said progress has been made in combating terrorism across Africa, but that militant groups are still taking advantage of unrest, political instability, and weak governance in several areas of the continent. In an annual report to the U.S. Congress, the State Department said Thursday that counterterrorism efforts by U.S., European, and regional forces have "done much to roll back and contain the threat" of terrorism in Africa over the past year. But it said a series of revolutions, ethnic rebellions and military coups in the region have "complicated the terrorism picture" and presented militant groups with new opportunities to operate in the region. In Libya, it said terrorists were able to exploit the security vacuum, weak governance,...
(New Era 05/31/13)
Investing in infrastructure is key to Africa's growth and the Namibian State has long recognised that modern, reliable infrastructure is critical for high and sustainable economic growth. Without such infrastructure, almost everything in the economic value chain tends to be slower, less reliable, unnecessarily expensive, ultimately rendering the entire country's economic system inefficient. According to data released by the African Development Bank (ADB) shortages in infrastructure such as roads, housing, water, sanitation and electricity reduce sub-Saharan Africa's output by up to 40 percent. During the last week alone New Era has reported massive investments by both the private and public sectors, as well as through public private partnerships (PPPs), which are aimed at propelling Namibia onto the world stage in...
( 05/31/13)
Namibia, already the driest country in sub-Saharan Africa, is experiencing a severe drought, with some regions receiving the lowest seasonal rainfall in three decades, according to figures released by the country's meteorological service this week. President Hifikepunye Pohamba declared the drought a national emergency on 17 May, following an Emergency Food Security Assessment that found that 331,000 people - over 14 percent of the total population - were in need of food assistance. "Because of the climate conditions in Namibia, there'll always be pockets of food insecure communities," UN Resident Coordinator Timothy Bandora told IRIN. "Government has declared an emergency not because the situation is dire now, but because down the road [it will worsen]." Cereal production for 2013 is...

Pages