Friday 24 November 2017
(AFP (eng) 06/12/17)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel will on Monday meet African leaders in Berlin on initiatives aiming to reduce the poverty and conflict driving a mass migrant influx to Europe. The idea is to team up African nations willing to reform with private investors who would bring business and jobs to a continent where instability or graft often scare off foreign companies. Merkel is hosting the initiative as part of Germany's presidency of the Group of 20 powerful economies, whose leaders meet in the northern port of Hamburg a month later. Invited to Berlin are Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and the leaders of Ghana, Ivory Coast...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/08/17)
More girls are completing secondary school across sub-Saharan Africa as attitudes change and state spending rises, but some of the most marginalized girls — like those married young or forced to work — are still missing out, education experts say. The percentage of girls completing secondary school has risen in all regions of Africa since 2005, said a recent report by the African Development Bank, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the U.N. Development Program. Almost twice as many girls in East Africa and three times as many in Central Africa completed secondary education in 2014 as in 2005, according to the annual African Economic Outlook report, which was published at the end of last month. Yet more...
(The Namibian 06/07/17)
Government received the transport master plan for the four northern regions of Ohangwena, Omusati, Oshana and Oshikoto on Monday. Urban and rural development minister Sophia Shaningwa told The Namibian yesterday that the plan will guide the roads network in the northern regions. "The plan basically shows us if people are building fixed assets too close to the road, and how to locate the margins," she said. Close to N$12,8 billion has been committed towards the master plan. The minister said the plan was completed after wide consultations with various stakeholders, including regional and local councils, as well as the Motor Vehicle Accident (MVA) Fund. "The country is currently experiencing a high carnage
(The Namibian 06/07/17)
Namibia hopes to have a diversified and competitive tourism sector which attracts 1,8 million tourists by 2022, according to the recently released fifth National Development Plan (NDP5). According to the NDP5 document, Namibia remains heavily dependent on its top ten tourist destinations, hence the need exists to expand the number of tourist markets serving the country to ensure the sustainability of the sector. Although Namibia has good infrastructure in most parts of the country, a lack of infrastructure in some tourist areas continues to hamper the growth of the sector, states the document. "Namibia is a remarkable and competitive destination because of its comparative advantages, which include the wide open spaces with spectacular landscapes, abundant wildlife resources, a diversity of...
(New Era 06/07/17)
Windhoek — President Hage Geingob says there is much ground to cover to ensure the complete lifting of the United States of America's long running economic and trade blockade against Cuba. Geingob made the remarks yesterday during the commencement of the 5th Continental African Conference in Solidarity with Cuba, where about 174 delegates, including several Cuban nationals, were gathered. He said Africa would continue to support the people of Cuba until the world sees the total elimination of existing economic and commercial barriers, noting that some progress had been made, particularly following the release of the Cuban Five (who were held in the U.S. on dubious espionage charges), but said it was necessary that the U.S. lift its economic and...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/07/17)
Building a network of African women leaders in fields ranging from business to politics could galvanize female leadership across the continent and boost peacebuilding efforts and good governance, the head of U.N. Women said on Tuesday. The African Women Leaders Network, which was launched last week in New York by the United Nations and the African Union Commission, hopes to drive more women into leadership roles, through mentoring, peer learning and harnessing contacts. By supporting women's leadership in Africa, the platform aims to galvanize their contributions to building and sustaining peace, improving political processes and driving social change, and realizing the U.N. global goals, according to U.N. Women. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), adopted in 2015, include targets on...
(Xinhuanet 06/06/17)
Delegates of an African conference in solidarity with Cuba on Monday called on the United States to lift its over 50-year economic blockade against Cuba. "We applaud the positive development in this respect and we commend the U.S. government and Cuba for their efforts towards normalizing of ties," said Namibian President Hage Geingob, officially opening the fifth Continental Africa Conference in Solidarity with Cuba here on Monday. "However, there is still much ground left to cover to ensure the complete lifting of the blockage against Cuba," said Geingob. According to Geingob, the conference will lead to the development of the common African strategy in terms of support to Cuba. The delegates also called for the return of the Guantanamo Bay,...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/02/17)
Namibia will invest 164 billion Namibian dollars ($12.44 billion) over the next five years on plans which include upgrading and revamping hospitals, and building water and energy infrastructure, President Hage Geingob said on Wednesday. The investment package under a National Development Plan will be deployed on programmes and projects which also cover agriculture, technical and vocational training, and industrial development. "This would involve modernising and up-scaling our production sectors and systems including agriculture, manufacturing, fisheries, mining and tourism," Geingob said at the launch of the programme. "By focusing on these sectors, we should be able to create more jobs to absorb new entrants
(Lusaka Times 06/02/17)
Windhoek –Zambian authorities are detaining 70 drivers and have impounded 200 Namibian trucks that were carrying timber from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The trucks have been impounded for about five months and this has so far cost the trucks owners about R100 million, according to the Namibian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (NCCI), which is demanding the immediate release of the trucks. The trucks were impounded because Zambian laws prohibits the harvesting of Mukula timber in the country. The Mukula timber in the Namibian trucks was, however, harvested by businesses operating in the DRC with valid permits from the government of the DRC to do so. The Namibian truckers were simply transporting goods from the suppliers to the clients...
(The Namibian 06/02/17)
The hospitality industry at the coast says the emergence of the online marketplace and hospitality service which enables people to lease or rent accommodation on short-term basis is threatening their businesses. Airbnb enables people to lease or rent apartments, homes, hostel and hotels rooms without any operators licence nor adherence to the industry's standards and practices. The company does not own any lodgings; it is merely a broker, and receives commission from guests and hosts for every booking. It has over three million accommodation listings in 65 000 cities and in 191 countries. Anett König of the Hotel Association of Namibia (HAN) at Swakopmund said there were about 225 Airbnb members from Swakopmund and Walvis Bay, most of them not...
(The Namibian 06/02/17)
President Hage Geingob has appointed two new High Court judges, the Judicial Service Commission announced yesterday. The two new judges, Boas Usiku and Hannelie Prinsloo, are both currently acting judges of the High Court, and have been appointed as permanent judges with effect from the beginning of July, it was announced. Usiku has been an acting judge since September last year, while Prinsloo has been acting on the High Court bench since February this year. Prinsloo has been a magistrate since 1996, and was a principal magistrate at the Swakopmund Magistrate's Court. She obtained law degrees from the University of South Africa and the North-West University (Potchefstroom campus), also in South Africa. Usiku was admitted as a legal practitioner at...
(Xinhuanet 06/02/17)
Fifty-four African Union member states will convene the 5th Continental Conference of Solidarity with Cuba in the Namibian capital from June 5-7, said an Naminian official on Thursday. The Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of International relations and Cooperation, Selma Ashipala-Musavyi, said the aim of hosting the conference in Namibia is to intensify solidarity and to strengthen bounds of friendship between the people of Cuba and the progressive peoples throughout the African Continent. Namibia's President Hage Geingob will open and address the conference, which will run under the theme, "Intensifying Solidarity and continuing the legacy of Fidel and Che". The conference, which will also be attended by a Cuban delegation, will also recognize the important work done in support of...
(AFP (eng) 06/01/17)
One in five children born with a twin sibling in sub-Saharan Africa dies before the age of five -- three times the rate among singletons, said a study Thursday. Almost two-thirds die in the first month of life -- often succumbing to the after-effects of a difficult birth or entering the world too early or underweight, according to research published in The Lancet medical journal. And while rates of under-five deaths in the sub-Saharan African region have declined over two decades, the improvement has been much slower for twins than for single-borns. "Twins account for 10.7 percent of all under-five deaths and 15.1 percent of neonatal (newborn) deaths in the region and these percentages are increasing," the study said. "The...
(Washington Post 05/31/17)
The old man’s house had become a camp for the displaced. In the back yard, groups of women boiled water for rice. Small children skittered across the dirt, running into the bedroom, where they careened around the long, skinny legs of Elijah Karama. “Because of the conditions, they are mine to take care of,” said Karama, 57, more tired than proud. By conditions, he meant Boko Haram’s destruction of vast areas of northeastern Nigeria, and the hunger crisis that has followed. This city of about 1 million has absorbed an additional 1 million people who fled the Islamist militants who burned their villages and kidnapped hundreds of children. In Maiduguri, the vast majority of the displaced aren’t living in U.N...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/27/17)
Leaders of the Group of Seven wealthy nations met African heads of state on Saturday, the final day of their annual summit which has been marked by discord over climate change, but unity on tackling terrorism. Italy had hoped to make Africa the major focus of the annual G7 gathering, holding the discussions on the island of Sicily that has taken in hundreds of thousands of migrants over the past four years as they flee war and poverty back home. However, the two-day meeting got overshadowed by a suicide bombing in northern England on Monday that killed 22 people, and also got bogged down by lengthy discussions on the merit of free trade and the 2015 Paris Agreement to tackle...
(AFP (eng) 05/26/17)
Entertainment | France | film | festival | Cannes | Zambia | witchcraft Cannes, France | AFP | Friday 5/26/2017 - 14:01 UTC+3 | 615 words by Katy Lee Being accused of witchcraft is no laughing matter in Africa -- but movie director Rungano Nyoni decided a dose of humour was just what was needed to tackle a problem rampant in parts of the continent. Set in Zambia, the sharp satire "I Am Not A Witch" has premiered to strong reviews at the Cannes film festival, taking aim at the blatant sexism behind accusations that overwhelmingly target women. White tourists are seen gawping at women detained in a "witch camp" in the movie, taking pictures of them as if they're...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/24/17)
When U.S. President Donald Trump and other leaders of the world's seven major industrialized nations gather in Sicily on Friday, they will enjoy a spectacular view of the Mediterranean Sea, but won't get any glimpse of boats full of migrants. A common sight off Sicily in recent years, the authorities have banned all migrant landings on the island during the Group of Seven Summit for security reasons, telling rescue vessels that pick them up at sea to take them to the mainland during the two-day meeting. Out of sight does not mean out of mind. Italy chose to host the summit in Taormina, on the cliffs of eastern Sicily, to concentrate minds on Europe's migrant crisis and to seek ways...
(New Era 05/23/17)
Windhoek — The Ovaherero Traditional Authority (OTA) is said to be considering a trip to Germany in an effort to repatriate human remains of people taken from here by colonial authorities more than a 100 years ago that have been identified in Germany. This follows a statement by the Ministry of Education, Arts and Culture to the Ovaherero Genocide Foundation on the May 5 saying: "The government will not fund any individual who would like to go to Germany for this." Confirming receipt of such news, spokesperson of OTA Bob Kandetu told New Era that the OTA is considering an expedition to Germany to collect the remains of ancestors that were taken abroad. "We have decided that in principle we...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/23/17)
Fossils from Greece and Bulgaria of an ape-like creature that lived 7.2 million years ago may fundamentally alter the understanding of human origins, casting doubt on the view that the evolutionary lineage that led to people arose in Africa. Scientists said on Monday the creature, known as Graecopithecus freybergi and known only from a lower jawbone and an isolated tooth, may be the oldest-known member of the human lineage that began after an evolutionary split from the line that led to chimpanzees, our closest cousins. The jawbone, which included teeth, was unearthed in 1944 in Athens. The premolar was found in south-central Bulgaria in 2009. The researchers examined them using sophisticated new techniques including CT scans and established their age...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/22/17)
Countries in sub-Saharan Africa need to get their budgets in order, diversify their economies and look after their poorest people. If they do that, there is no reason why the region cannot have the strong growth needed to meet the aspirations of a young and growing population. That, at least, is the three-pillared prescription from the International Monetary Fund as expressed by one of its top Africa researchers, Celine Allard, in an official IMF blog post and podcast. Allard co-authored the Fund's regional economic outlook, released earlier this month. It found that sub-Saharan economic growth hit only 1.4 percent last year, the lowest level in two decades and well off the 5-6 percent rates normally reached. It was also well...

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