| Africatime
Friday 24 March 2017
(New Era 10/25/16)
After their land resettlement applications failed for about two decades, a group of fed-up farmers on Thursday moved onto farm Dickbusch - owned by government - with their livestock. The group, calling themselves the Aroab Small Farmers Union, say they have for the past 20 years exhausted all possible legal ways to get resettled, as well as engaged various governors and councillors on their urgent need for land, but all in vain. The group say they cannot continue to farm at the 1 700-hectare camp at Aroab, which belongs to the Aroab Village Council, and thus want to be resettled at Dickbusch. The farm is located about 45 kilometres west of Aroab and measures about 8 400 hectares. The farmers...
(New Era 10/25/16)
Walvis Bay — Drought-stricken farmers and other residents in Erongo Region, especially in Okongo and Omatjete settlements in Daures Constituency, are living in fear of their lives as they are constantly being 'harassed' by herds of elephant. The situation, described as worrisome and stressful by some farmers, was also yesterday confirmed by the Governor of Erongo Region, Cleophas Mutjavikua, who feels something needs to be done urgently to protect the lives of farmers from these marauding beasts before someone is killed. Mutjavikua said the situation is very stressful, adding that it was already brought to the attention of the Ministry of Environment and Tourism. "The ministry is doing very little to help find a solution. In the meantime the elephants...
(AFP (eng) 10/25/16)
The International Criminal Court on Monday urged member states to seek a consensus with critical African nations, while stressing that South Africa and Burundi's announced departures would not take place for at least year. "Today more than ever, there is a huge need for universal justice," said Sidiki Kaba, president of the assembly of state parties to the ICC founding treaty, evoking "the tragedies which are happening in front of our eyes". Kaba, also Senegal's justice minister, said it was necessary "to engage in dialogue with the nations which want to leave the ICC. For that we must listen to their concerns, their recriminations and their criticism". South Africa dealt a heavy blow to the troubled international court on Friday...
(This Day Live 10/24/16)
The London Stock Exchange (LSE) has provided $26.1 billion for African companies in the last 10 years, the Chief Executive Officer of the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE), Mr. Oscar Onyema has said. Onyema disclosed this while speaking at the third “London & Lagos Capital Markets in Partnership’ conference held at the LSE at the weekend. According to him, eight Nigerian companies were among those that benefitted from the international capital raising on the LSE, noting that more African companies (112) are listed in London than any other international exchange. The 112 companies, he said, have a combined market capitalisation in excess of $200 billion, the largest concentration of African quoted companies outside of Johannesburg. Out of these companies, eight companies...
(AFP (eng) 10/21/16)
Demand for homegrown contemporary music is sweeping Africa and driving a creative boom in an industry otherwise battered by falling CD sales and rampant piracy. A recent study of the entertainment sector by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) accountants showed rapid earnings growth in many African countries, fuelled largely by live performances by local artists. "Consumers are increasingly wanting local content," Vicki Myburgh, a PwC director who conducted the study released last month, told AFP. "The Nigerian music market... will (soon) grow at nearly 13 percent annually, which is a fantastic rate." This weekend, African talent will be celebrated in Johannesburg at the annual MTV Africa awards set up in 2008 to recognise those "who have made the most impact on African music...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/20/16)
Encouraged by their success in halting a mass influx of refugees by closing Greek borders and cutting a controversial deal with Turkey, EU leaders are getting tough on African migrants too. A Brussels summit on Thursday will endorse pilot projects to pressure African governments via aid budgets to slow an exodus of people north across the Sahara and Mediterranean. It also wants swift results from an EU campaign to deport large numbers who reach Italy. "By the end of the year, we need to see results," one senior EU diplomat said on Wednesday. Arrivals in Italy so far this year are nearly six percent higher than the same period of 2015. Italy received 154,000 migrants last year and this year's...
(The Namibian 10/19/16)
With more airlines granted rights to fly to Namibia, competition for the loss-prone state airline Air Namibia has become tougher. The airline is currently undertaking a strategic plan for the period 2016/17 to 2020/21. The airline is six months into the implementation of the plan and still has four years and six months left to implement the plan. "This plan has a number of initiatives to be undertaken and implemented, with timeliness defined. What we set to do in the first six months of this plan has been implemented successfully and we are seeing positive results as per the plan for the period thus far," said Air Namibia's corporate communications manager, Paul Nakawa, in response to a query by The...
(Bloomberg 10/19/16)
Fifteen years ago, a South African media company invested $34 million in an obscure Chinese Internet developer. Today that stake is worth $88 billion. All Naspers Ltd., now Africa’s most valuable company, has to do is figure out how to make money from its other properties: The whole company is worth only $72 billion, less than its stake in Shenzhen-based Tencent Holdings Ltd. Investors aren’t impressed with Naspers’s operations in pay-TV, newspapers and e-commerce in such countries as South Africa, Russia and India. To win them over, Chief Executive Officer Bob Van Dijk has launched an aggressive push to sell some assets, invest in others and expand operations such as classified advertising into new markets. If it pays off, comparisons...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/18/16)
Dubai - Emirates airline could reduce the frequency of its flights to African cities or cut routes completely if current economic and financial challenges on the continent continue, President Tim Clark told reporters. Foreign airlines flying to Nigeria have started to refuel abroad because jet fuel supplies there have become more expensive and scarce as the country battles a hard currency shortage. Emirates has started a detour to Accra, Ghana to refuel its daily Abuja-bound flight, a spokesperson said last month; the airline had already cut its twice-daily flights to Lagos and Abuja to just one. “In certain African countries, the currencies have really gone down, so we're reflecting on a number of these to look at where it's just...
(The Namibian 10/17/16)
The Namibian Broadcasting Corporation (NBC)'s board chairperson, Sven Thieme, yesterday said he cannot commit to increasing workers' salaries because their budget was reduced from about N$360m to N$250m for the 2016/17 financial year. NBC workers staged a lunch-time demonstration on Friday across the country last week, demanding an 8% salary increase. On Friday, the NBC's marketing manager Toucy Tjijombo handed over a petition on behalf of the workers to the human resources general manager, Vezenga Kauraisa, in Windhoek. The workers gave the NBC until Friday for feedback. They gave the reason for their demand for an 8% salary increase as the need to have their own houses, and the ever-escalating cost of living. Thieme said as a board of directors,...
(The Namibian 10/17/16)
Investigations are still underway after a Cessna 210 aircraft crashed in an open field along David Meroro Street in Pionierspark in Windhoek on Saturday. According to an airport official who refused to be named, the plane crashed between 13h30 and 14h00. No fatalities were recorded. The pilot walked away with only injuries to the face and arm after the aircraft he was flying crashed. "I think the pilot held the plane really well. His training kicked in and saved his life," said Mike Böttger, managing director of Scenic Air, where the pilot works. Pheo Shilongo, the deputy director of aircraft accident investigations in the Ministry of Works and Transport, confirmed that South African pilot Wesley Thompson was a licensed pilot...
(Voice of America 10/17/16)
Telecom workers in Burkina Faso were on strike again this month, leading to phone and internet interruptions. The country has only one internet service provider, Onatel, but the days of the telecom monopoly in Africa may ending. The Burkina Faso telecommunications authority fined Onatel 5 billion CFA francs ($8.5 million U.S.) in response to the strike, which cut internet access across the country for more than a week. Arouna Ouédraogo, an information technology specialist, said people without access to the internet become desperate. He said he businesspeople rushing to his internet cafe with contracts to sign and documents to send, but he couldn't help them. "People outside this country just cannot imagine that there is no internet" for such an...
(AFP (eng) 10/15/16)
Stemming the astronomical losses caused by crime in the oceans surrounding Africa is the focus of a major continental summit on Saturday in the Togolese capital, Lome. "Over recent decades, the accumulated revenue losses resulting directly from illegal activities in the African maritime sector add up to hundreds of billions of US dollars, without counting the loss of human lives," the African Union (AU) said in an online statement about its Protect Our Oceans meeting. Up to 30 African heads of state and government are expected to attend the gathering, whose full title is the AU Extraordinary Summit on Maritime Security and Safety and Development in Africa. The long-term aim, according to the AU, is to "make maritime space the...
(APA 10/14/16)
Namibia and Angola are set to sign a Memorandum of Understanding on a power interconnector project to boost integration of the southern African regional power grid, Namibian Mines and Energy Minister Obeth Kandjoze said Friday. Kandjoze is quoted by Namibia Press Agency saying that Namibia is working with Angola on feasibility studies for the Angola-Namibia power transmission project. The intergovernmental Memorandum of Understanding on this has been prepared and is under evaluation by the two governments before signature, he said. The minister said the project involves the construction of power transmission lines from the proposed Baynes Hydropower Plant in lower Kunene on the Namibian side
(APA 10/14/16)
Namibian Education Minister Katrina Hanse-Himarwa said the government is working towards finding a lasting solution regarding the on-going strike by teachers to ensure that lessons resume next week, according to the state-run New Era on Friday. The government on Wednesday suspended lessons in the country and postponed national examinations for Grade 10 and 12 that were scheduled for Thursday and Friday after teachers down tools over a salary increase dispute. APA has learned that the Office of Prime Minister and the Namibia National Teachers Union are back on the negotiation table, and that the State has offered a 6.5-percent pay hike, which the union rejected. The union is demanding a seven-percent salary increase. In a press statement, Prime Minister Sarah...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/14/16)
About 70 sub-Saharan African migrants forced their way over a barbed wire barrier into Spain’s North African enclave of Melilla Thursday. They ran to a local immigration center where they were met by dozens of migrants cheering “victory, victory” although their legal status in Spain has yet to be determined. Migrants wait weeks and sometimes months at the short-stay immigrant center in the hope of being transferred to a refugee reception center in mainland Spain, said Government Delegation of Melilla spokesperson Irene Flores. Spain has two enclaves in Morocco, Ceuta and Melilla, and both are hot spots for African migrants making their way to Europe either by climbing over the barriers, going around them or swimming along the coastline. After...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/13/16)
When German Chancellor Angela Merkel toured three African nations this week for talks on curbing migration to Europe, the leader of the world's poorest country, Niger, suggested it would take a "Marshall Plan" of massive aid to stop people coming. Merkel politely declined the request, expressing concern about how well the aid would be spent and noting that, at a summit in Malta last year, the European Union had already earmarked 1.8 billion euros for a trust fund to train and resettle migrants. But Niger's President Mahatma Issoufou also proposed something perhaps more significant, in the long run, than a development package - bringing Niger's population growth down from 3.9 percent, the highest in the world. Though he gave no...
(Graphic Online 10/12/16)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel has emphasised that Africa will be a priority when her country takes over the G20's revolving presidency at the end of 2016. Speaking in Ethiopia yesterday on the final stage of a three-nation African tour, which also included visits to Mali and Niger, Mrs Merkel pledged development as well as military aid on her trip. She said it was important to stem migration at its source. Germany took in more than one million irregular migrants last year - many from war-ravaged Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, but also many fleeing economic hardship across Africa. Migration is expected to be a key issue in next year's federal elections, though Mrs Merkel has not yet declared whether she will...
(AFP (eng) 10/11/16)
Raised on the backstabbing intrigue of 1980s American soaps "Dallas" and "Dynasty", and later, the heady drama of South American telenovelas, Africans are enjoying a surge in local TV content they can finally identify with. It took a while, but in the past decade local programming has soared in sub-Saharan Africa's key economies, a rise driven by both foreign satellite networks and television stations on the continent. This growth has delivered up local shows such as Kenya's comedic "Real Househelps of Kawangware" -- a play on the US "Real Housewives" series -- along with talk shows, political satire and continent-wide reality TV such as "Big Brother Africa" and "Project Fame". And demand is set to grow with the number of...
(AFP (eng) 10/10/16)
Africa will come together to battle piracy and illegal fishing for the first time at an African Union maritime security summit that kicks off in Togo on October 15. The continent urgently needs to fight "extremely high stakes" piracy and illegal fishing in its waters by joining forces over policy and working to raise necessary funds, Togo's Foreign Minister Robert Dussey told AFP ahead of the meeting. - Why is this meeting being held? - "These are very high stakes for Africa. At least 92 percent of imported goods arrive on the continent across the seas and oceans. Of the 54 countries in the African Union, 33 have a coastline," said Dussey. "During the summit, several issues will be tackled...

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