Sunday 20 August 2017
(Xinhuanet 08/16/17)
As Namibia seeks to improve citizens' livelihoods through education, a China-funded school in the national capital Windhoek is contributing to the realization of the goal. Chairman Mao Zedong High School, named after the Chinese communist revolutionary leader, has become a beam of hope for students, who had to receive lessons in makeshift temporary structures. According to George Louw, the principal, the school in Otjomuise 7de Laan informal settlement in Windhoek is bridging gaps of education provision in the community. "The school has given hope not only to educators and the community, but also to our learners who now have the privilege of accessing inclusive education in a conducive learning environment. The learners were previously taught...
(Bloomberg 08/14/17)
The U.S. will probably maintain its current levels of aid to Africa despite President Donald Trump’s proposals to slash funding, according to Bill Gates, the world’s richest man. Trump said in May his government would no longer allocate funding for family planning, a move that has the potential to undermine aid programs in the poorest countries in the world. However, with Congress in control of the budget, it’s unlikely that all cuts proposed by the Trump administration will go ahead next year, Gates said in an interview in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s commercial capital. “It’s quite clear that they won’t make those drastic cuts,” Gates said. “I’m hopeful they won’t make any cuts at all, but that’s still subject to...
(The Namibian 08/01/17)
Government will welcome discussions on ancestral land at the second land conference scheduled for September this year, international relations minister Netumbo Nandi-Ndaitwah announced yesterday. The deputy premier said this during the diplomatic corps' bi-annual briefing, which was aimed at informing foreign diplomats in Namibia about the country's position on different global issues. At the event, diplomats discussed the country's developmental agenda, which is aligned to the African Union's Agenda 2063, and the United Nations' Agenda 2030. Nandi-Ndaitwah said Namibia could make use of the diplomatic representation in the country in order to benefit from different thematic clusters “that were recently agreed upon at the United Nations”.
(AFP (eng) 07/31/17)
Scores of people waving rainbow flags peacefully paraded through the streets of Namibia's capital Windhoek on Saturday, calling for better legal protection of gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgender people in the largely conservative country. Around 150 people, decked out in the gay pride colours, danced and marched their way down Windhoek's main thoroughfare, Independence Avenue, chanting "we are one" in what was the first gay pride march in the Namibian capital. They were cheered on by most onlookers who applauded as the marchers made their way through the city centre. However some passersby yelled derogatory comments at the gay pride marchers.
(Xinhuanet 07/31/17)
Namibian President Hage Geingob on Sunday urged all Namibians to respect traditional authorities. Geingob made the remarks when he addressed a cultural festival in the Zambezi region, northeast of the country. The festival, organized by the Masubia Traditional Authority, is an annual event. This year's event was attended by several ministers and other chiefs from different traditional authorities. In his address, Geingob said Namibians should treat all traditional authorities with respect. He also said traditional authorities should also practice fair...
(The Guardian 07/19/17)
Don’t despair that the huge gaps between rich and poor cannot ever be bridged. As our new index shows, some countries are taking steps to reduce inequality. When you hear eye-watering statistics like the fact that eight men own the same amount of wealth as the bottom half of humanity, the first reaction is often shock and anger. For many people, this is accompanied by a feeling of despair that such huge divides cannot be bridged; that the inequality crisis...
(Xinhuanet 07/19/17)
Namibia now has an Open Defecation Free village -- Ondingwanyama in the north of the country, about 730 kilometers from capital Windhoek. All 68 households in the village have built sanitation facilities in line with Goal Number 6 of the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. In a statement Wednesday, the Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry said there is need to strengthen political will at all levels to ensure that sanitation and hygiene are included as one of the top...
(Reuters (Eng) 07/18/17)
Three years after he risked his life crossing the Mediterranean Sea from Libya to Italy on a small boat crammed with migrants, 22-year-old Sow Muhammed can hardly believe his luck. The former street hawker from Guinea now works as a caterer in Venice, rents his own apartment, and sends money back home regularly to his mother and siblings in the West African nation. "I am happy I came to Europe, and my family is also happy," he told the Thomson...
(APA 07/14/17)
The Inspector General of Namibian Police, Sebastian Ndeitunga, has said the police investigation into the case of former executives of the defunct SME Bank, concerning the disappearance of N$200 million is akin to organised crime. The state-owned New Era newspaper quoted Ndeitunga in its Thursday edition as saying evidence gathered by the police in Namibia and South Africa, in the SME Bank investment saga, points to a “high possibility of organised crime”. He said the police investigation concerns possible fraud,...
(APA 07/14/17)
Newspapers in Namibia on Friday zoomed conspiracy to weaken the national carrier - Air Namibia, the President silence on rampant abuse by public funds by government officials and the disbanding of SME Bank, which send 208 employees into the streets. Img : Namibia: Press zooms on national carrier, alleged mismanagement of public funds The Namibian said Air Namibia is aggrieved about being kept in the dark over the recent sale of four Embraer ERJ 135 (37-seater) planes leased for its...
(Cnbc Africa 07/12/17)
"Africa is an awakening giant," according to the former South African President Frederik Willem de Klerk speaking at the World Petroleum Congress in Istanbul. The leader who oversaw the transition of his country's power to Nelson Mandela said Tuesday that the future looks bright for a continent previously blighted by war, famine and a lack of infrastructure. "I believe Africa is an awakening giant and, yes, it is not performing according to what we expected soon enough, but it will...
(Voice of America 07/11/17)
In the past five years, terrorist attacks have killed nearly 20,000 people across Africa. Two groups, Boko Haram and al-Shabab, accounted for 71 percent of reported incidents and 91 percent of fatalities. But, while these and other militant groups remain active, fatal terrorist attacks across the continent are on pace to fall for a second straight year, and the total number of attacks is running far below 2012 highs. These findings are part of VOA’s original analysis of data from...
(AFP (eng) 07/06/17)
The costs of diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa could double to almost $60 billion annually just 13 years from now, as obesity fuels an explosion of the disease, a report said Thursday. In 2015, the overall diabetes cost in the region was nearly $20 billion (18 billion euros), or 1.2 percent of total economic production, according to research published by The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. This included medication and hospital stays, and loss of labour productivity due to illness or death. About half of all treatment costs were paid for by patients themselves.
(Voice of America 07/04/17)
GENEVA — The U.N. children’s fund warns tens of thousands of malnourished children are at great risk in Yemen, Somalia and South Sudan, which are on the brink of famine. UNICEF reports an estimated 4.7 million children in the cholera-stricken countries are malnourished. Of these, UNICEF spokesman Christofe Boulierac tells VOA, more than one million are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. “Let me remind you that a child who is suffering from severe acute malnutrition are nine times more likely...
(RFI(EN) 07/04/17)
New tax rules in Israel could leave hundreds of African migrants worse off than they are. In May, the government introduced a new deposit law, enabling the governemnt to take 20 percent of migrants' salaries each month and place it out of reach. The money can only be accessed once they leave the country. Rights groups say the policy is designed to force them out of the country. "We're not pressuring you to leave but will make your life miserable...
(APA 06/28/17)
A state media delegation from Zimbabwe is in Namibia for a week-long visit during which it will discuss the renewal of a cooperation agreement that has seen the two countries cooperating in the areas of electronic and print journalism for more than a decade. The two sides are meeting to discuss the renewal of a 2004 Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Electronic and Print Media, which they believe has been overtaken by current developments in the media sector such as...
(AFP (eng) 06/28/17)
The generic version of the most advanced drug against HIV has been introduced in Kenya, a first in Africa where more than 25 million have the disease, the NGO Unitaid said Wednesday. The drug, Dolutegravir (DTG) is the anti-retroviral drug of choice for those living with HIV in developed countries, but its high price has put it out of reach for most struggling with the disease in Africa. "The generic DTG has two advantages: on the one hand, it is...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/23/17)
DAR ES SALAAM (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Sadick Thenest remembers how his 8-year-old daughter had a narrow brush with death two years ago, when she contracted cholera after drinking contaminated water. “She was so gaunt, weak and had terrible diarrhea,” said the refugee from Burundi. “A slight delay in rushing her to hospital would have meant something else - but with God’s grace she survived.” The father of four, aged 35, is among thousands of refugees grappling with frequent outbreaks...
(Voice of America 06/21/17)
WASHINGTON DC — On June 5, Saudi Arabia and its allies, including Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, cut diplomatic ties with Qatar, accusing it of funding extremist groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood and Islamic State. In response, Qatar said it was the victim of a policy of “domination and control” by its larger neighbor and that Saudi Arabia was, in fact, the one responsible for backing extremism. So what is the truth? Fundamentalist strains of Islam, including...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/15/17)
Anglo American's (AAL.L) diamond unit De Beers on Thursday launched the world's largest diamond exploration vessel off the coast of Namibia as it looks to maintain high production levels until 2035. The 12,000-tonne, 113-metre-long SS Nujoma was built at a cost of $157 million and is named after Sam Nujoma, Namibia's founding president. "I am very, very confident this (vessel) will allow us to continue to extract 1.2 million carats a year," De Beers CEO Bruce Cleaver told Reuters by...

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