Friday 23 June 2017
(New Vision 05/10/17)
Uganda and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) require $8b (about sh30 trillion) to continue to provide services to over 1.2 million refugees and host communities in the next four years. This translates into $2b per year. Prime Minister, Ruhakana Rugunda, said that President Yoweri Museveni and the UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres, will host a joint summit on refugees between June 22 and 23 in Kampala to drum up financial contributions to Uganda to support refugee operations. More than half of the 1.2 million refugees in Uganda are South Sudanese. On average, according to UNHCR and Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) statistics, 2,000 South Sudanese have been arriving in Uganda daily in the last six months...
(New Vision 05/10/17)
Uganda through the Ministry of Health and the US government have entered a partnership aimed at enabling further biomedical research cooperation in preventing, diagnosing and treating the heavy burden of infectious diseases in Uganda. The fields for research and training include HIV/AIDS, malaria among other emerging diseases. Dr. Diana Atwine the Ministry of Health Permanent Secretary signed on behalf of Uganda whereas Deborah Malac, the US Ambassador to Uganda signed on behalf of the US. Currently, Uganda and the US are working closely in the Rakai Health Sciences Program under the Ugandan Virus Research Institute (UVRI), MoH and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a division of the US NIH and the Department of Health and Human...
(Fox News 05/10/17)
After five years of no major attacks on merchant vessels, piracy around the Horn of Africa seemed to be on hiatus. Acts of piracy in those treacherous waters have fallen sharply since 2012, according to statistics released by the United States Navy. The Navy credits aggressive patrolling by international forces and increased vigilance by the commercial shipping industry for the decrease. However, in the past month, Somali pirates have intercepted five ships, raising concerns that piracy has returned to the Indian Ocean, beginning with the kidnapping of a Sri Lankan crew from the Aris 13 oil tanker on March 13th (they were later released without a ransom). Nobody thinks the problem will end until a stable government is restored in...
(Xinhuanet 05/08/17)
Seven people were killed and two others critically injured in a road accident on Saturday in the central Ugandan district of Masaka. Lamek Kigozi, Masaka regional police spokesperson, told Xinhua that seven people aboard an Ipsum van died on the spot following a head-on collision with a Rwandan registered trailer at Mpungwe along the Kampala-Masaka highway. The spokesperson said the accident occurred after the driver of the Kampala-bound trailer drove on the right-hand side of the road instead of the left, according to Ugandan traffic regulations. "The cause of the accident was reckless driving. The driver of the trailer forgot. He was keeping on the right hand side of the road as it's always in Rwanda," said Kigozi. He said...
(AFP (eng) 05/05/17)
Thirteen men accused of involvement in the murder of high-ranking police officer Andrew Kaweesi and two aides appeared in court Friday, with some claiming they had been tortured while in detention. Some of the suspects were limping heavily as they arrived at the magistrates' court in the capital Kampala, and proceeded to display injuries they said were the result of police torture. Ahmad Senfuka Shaban, 30, a school teacher in Mukono, removed his shirt to show what appeared to be fresh injuries to his back, chest and left arm. In the dock another suspect told the magistrate judge, Noah Ssajjabi, that he and his co-accused had been held at the Nalufenya police station, about 80 kilometres (50 miles) from the...
(Voice of America 05/05/17)
As Africa grapples with a severe drought, and famine threatens millions of people, experts at the World Economic Forum on Africa this week in the South African city of Durban say food security needs to be a major part of discussions on advancing the continent economically. The annual World Economic Forum in Switzerland is usually a high-powered event, but at this week’s Africa meeting of the international organization, the continent’s big players are welcoming the humble farmer, now known as the “agripreneur.” Agricultural economist Paul Makube, with South Africa’s First National Bank, told VOA it makes sense to talk about farming when discussing building competitive markets, and boosting innovation and technology. “For business to prosper, you need a situation where...
(New Vision 05/04/17)
The problem, noted Museveni, has been fragmented vision, pointing out the example of African governments that at one point persecuted the private sector. The President was on Wednesday speaking as the chief panelist on the subject “Agenda 2063: Infrastructure Update” at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Durban, South Africa. The forum that started today (Wednesday) will run until Friday. “The political will has always been there. Many African governments have wanted to succeed since the 1960s. The problem has been ideological meandering, where you get one item and make it most important.
(Voice of America 05/04/17)
In Uganda, the case of a university lecturer jailed last month for allegedly insulting the president on Facebook has revived concern over what civil society groups say are growing efforts to limit freedom of expression in the country. Civil society groups in Uganda continue to campaign for the release of Stella Nyanzi. She remains behind bars awaiting a bail hearing, charged over allegedly calling President Yoweri Museveni “a pair of buttocks” in an online post. The university researcher had been on a public campaign to urge the president to fulfill his promise to provide sanitary pads to poor school girls. “We are seeing a state that is increasingly becoming intolerant of free speech, of right for association and so we...
(Daily Monitor 05/04/17)
President Museveni is on the receiving end of vitriolic criticism from the opposition and human rights world over his nomination of Inspector General of Police Kale Kayihura for a three year term in what critics now say is an affirmation of his personal rule project and tougher times ahead for activists opposed to the three decade long regime. Opposition legislators have now vowed to give Gen. Kayihura a 'bloody nose' when he enters appearance for vetting before parliament's appointments committee at a yet to be communicated date while activists such as Kampala Lord Mayor painted a grim picture of increased suppression of dissenting voices ahead of the expiry of Mr Museveni's term in 2021 as the constitution bars him from...
(New Vision 05/04/17)
Core inflation, a component of overall headline inflation which strips out food, fuel, metered water and electricity prices hit 4.9% from 4.7% Year-on-year headline inflation has hit 6.8% at the end of April from 6.4% in March on the back of higher vegetable prices, the Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS) said on Friday. Core inflation, a component of overall headline inflation which strips out food, fuel, metered water and electricity prices hit 4.9% from 4.7% after most parts of Uganda experienced a prolonged drought from 2016, affecting food prices in most markets. Alpha Capital Partners’ Stephen Kaboyo noted that there is a general underlying trend of building cost pressures that are feeding through from the harsh weather conditions in the...
(Daily Monitor 05/04/17)
Kampala — Uganda and Tanzania trail behind the rest of the East African countries on the score card sheet when it comes to the implementation of gender policies and law, a new study reveals. The report titled: "The EAC Pilot Gender Barometer and Challenges in Information Gap" score card is largely based on how citizens perceive governments in terms of existence of laws and policies and their effective implementation. The report launched on May 5, in Kampala during the East Africa Community (EAC) multi-stakeholder dialogue on gender equality, reveals that Rwanda scored highest in terms of commitments to gender equality laws and implementation with an average score of 76 per cent, Burundi at 53 per cent, Tanzania at 52 per...
(Xinhuanet 05/04/17)
The World Economic Forum (WEF) Africa Competitiveness Report 2017 released in Durban Thursday called for urgent policy reforms if the continent intends to create more jobs for its growing young population. According to the report issued at the 27th WEF on Africa, fewer than one-quarter of the 450 million new jobs required in the next 20 years will be created if current policies remain unchanged. The report called for structural reforms in the economies to create more jobs for the youth entering the market. African countries have to prioritize improving infrastructure, skills and adoption of new technology and quality of institutions. To improve competitiveness in the short term Africa needs to increase housing construction through investment, better urban planning and...
(Voice of America 05/03/17)
African military expenditures have finally slowed down after more than a decade of steady increases, according to a new report on global defense spending. The main reason, the report found, is a drop in oil prices. “The sharp decreases in oil prices has affected quite a number of African countries, namely South Sudan and Angola. This has kind of driven almost the entire regional trend,” said Nan Tian, a researcher at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute’s (SIPRI) Arms and Military Expenditure Program, the organization that authored the report. The SIPRI report found military spending in Africa in 2016 was down by 1.3 percent from the previous year and totaled about $37.9 billion. Despite the drop, Africa’s military spending remains...
(The Observer 05/02/17)
Egyptian foreign minister, Sameh Shoukry is to meet Ugandan President, Yoweri Museveni to discuss management of the R.Nile waters. According to a brief statement released by the Egyptian foreign ministry, Shoukry will deliver a letter to the president from his Egyptian counterpart, Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi, on dealing with water-security issues and the Nile Basin Initiative (NBI). The meeting is also aimed at boosting bilateral cooperation between Uganda and other countries within Nile Basin. In March, Mohammed Abdel-Atti, Egypt's minister of Water Resources and Irrigation attended the extraordinary Nile Council of Ministers (Nile-Com) where Egypt's demand for greater control of activities related to the flow of the river Nile were rejected. Sam Cheptoris, the Nile-Com chairman, also Uganda's minister of Water and...
(Bloomberg 05/02/17)
Saudi Aramco is seeking to boost its fuel-trading volume by more than a third as the world’s biggest crude exporter expands its capacity to refine oil to grab a bigger share of growing markets in Asia and Africa. Aramco, as Saudi Arabian Oil Co. is known, is building refineries in the kingdom and in Asia to help it increase sales and purchases of gasoline, diesel and other products to more than 2 million barrels a day, said Ibrahim Al-Buainain, chief executive officer of Saudi Aramco’s trading unit, Saudi Aramco Products Trading Co. Owning refineries gives the unit, known as Aramco Trading Co., options for buying and selling fuel that some of its competitors don’t have. “The key is that you...
(The Observer 04/28/17)
In a revealing testimony to a Parliamentary committee investigating the controversial Shs 6 billion cash reward to 42 senior government officials, President Museveni said he has had to endure ever since "he discovered oil in 2006", according to a source. Behind closed doors on Wednesday at State House, Entebbe, Museveni testified before Parliament's committee on Commissions, Statutory Authorities and State Enterprises (COSASE) that is investigating the cash reward, which was christened the "presidential handshake." Museveni told MPs that the issue they were investigating was not a small one because ever since the discovery of oil in 2006, it has been a source of big fights which drew in several African presidents. He named South Africa's Jacob Zuma whom he said...
(Daily Monitor 04/28/17)
Kampala — Former presidential candidate Dr Kizza Besigye re-appears before Nakawa Chief Magistrates Court this morning for the routine mention of his treason case. The State is expected to update the court and other concerned parties including Dr Besigye on how far police investigations into the treason case have gone. Should the State inform the court that they are done with investigations; the four-time presidential candidate will be sent to the High Court to stand trial. On the contrary, prosecution will ask court for an adjournment to a later date to enable them tie the loose ends in investigations. The court is also expected to extend the bail of the former Luweero bush war fighter for the next one month...
(Daily Monitor 04/28/17)
Kampala — Uganda is looking to tap into Equatorial Guinea's experience of oil production, in order to build its own capacity before oil production starts. Speaking at the Joint Oil and Gas Convention and Regional Logistics Expo at the Kampala Serena Hotel, on Thursday, country's President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, who wrapped up his visit to Uganda shorty after speaking at the conference, said they had agreed with President Museveni of Uganda on areas of corporations especially in the petroleum sector. Equatorial Guinea which produces 300,000 barrels per day has been an oil producing country for the last 20 years. "This visit has actually enabled us to identify a number of important areas for economic cooperation for the two countries,...
(Voice of America 04/28/17)
A low-cost and widely available drug could save the lives of 1 in 3 mothers who would otherwise bleed to death after childbirth, according to a new study. Severe bleeding, known as postpartum hemorrhage, or PPH, is the leading cause of maternal death worldwide, killing more than 100,000 women every year. Even for mothers who survive, it is a painful and traumatic experience. The world's poorest countries, especially in Africa and India, are the worst hit. Drug from 1960s But there is new hope. In the 1960s, Japanese researchers developed a drug called tranexamic acid, which works by stopping blood clots from breaking down. But they could not persuade doctors to try the drug for treating PPH. The London School...
(Voice of America 04/27/17)
This month saw hundreds of Ugandan shop owners march in Kampala against Chinese traders. Local merchants and some city officials want foreigners barred from petty commerce. The government has promised to address the long standing tensions. Inexpensive Chinese goods are common in the markets of downtown Kampala, where locals operate small businesses selling the imported merchandise. But it has also become increasingly common for Chinese in Uganda to set up shops selling the same items, only cheaper. Local shop owner Everest Kayondo, the Kampala Capital City Traders Association chairman

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