| Africatime
Saturday 29 April 2017
(Xinhuanet 03/02/17)
The Chinese government donated over 5,900 tonnes of rice to Ugandan on Tuesday as the East African country warned of food insecurity amid the prolonged dry spell. Zheng Zhuqiang, Chinese ambassador to Uganda, said China has been concerned about the poor harvest in many African countries including Uganda. "I believe that with the effort of the Ugandan government, all these donated food will be distributed to the people very soon," he said. According to a new report National Food Security Assessment, launched by Prime Minister Ruhakana Rugunda, 26 percent of Uganda's population is facing stressed food insecurity, meaning they just have enough food and are unable to afford some essential food expenditures. It also showed that 10.9 million people in...
(AFP (eng) 03/02/17)
A film raging against colonialism and the exploitation of Africa wowed viewers at the continent's top cinema festival Wednesday, winning shouts of approval at a screening packed to bursting point. "The African Storm" tells the story of an African president who nationalises businesses run by racist, cynical Western executives. Directed and produced by its Beninese star Sylvestre Amoussou, it tackles several hot-button issues including an exit from the CFA franc currency, closer ties with Russia and China as opposed to the West, criticism of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, and pride in being African. One of 20 feature-length movies on show at the Panafrican Film and Television Festival (Fespaco) in Burkina Faso's capital Ouagadougou, the movie was punctuated...
(Xinhuanet 03/01/17)
The Ugandan government on Tuesday warned that its population was slipping into the food insecure phase due to the prolonged dry spell that has led to crop failure. In a new report launched here dubbed National Food Security Assessment, an estimated 69 percent of the country's population is minimally food insecure. "These households still have food stocks from the second harvest that are expected to last for the next two to three months," the report launched by Prime Minister Ruhakana Rugunda said in part. The report also showed that 26 percent of the total population is facing stressed food insecurity meaning that the population just has enough food and is unable to afford some essential food expenditures. It also showed...
(AFP (eng) 02/28/17)
The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership -- the world's biggest individual prize -- drew a blank once again in finding a suitable laureate, it was announced Tuesday. The prize only goes to a democratically-elected African leader who demonstrated exceptional leadership, served their mandated term and left office within the last three years. The award comes with $5 million (4.7 million euros) paid over 10 years and $200,000 annually for life from then on. The prize, founded by Sudan-born telecoms tycoon Mo Ibrahim, has only been given four times in its 10-year existence. The philanthropist has said in the past that making no award sent just as strong a message on African leadership. "A very high bar was deliberately...
(AFP (eng) 02/27/17)
An African road movie about four women wowed its audience Sunday as it kicked off the Panafrican cinema and television festival (Fespaco), a showcase for the continent's burgeoning film industry. "Borders" ("Frontieres") directed by Apolline Traore, a Fespaco laureate in 2013, sweeps across Africa as its protagonists journey through Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso and Benin on their way to Nigeria. Along the way the women -- Ivorian, Senegalese, Burkinabe and Nigerian actresses -- are spared nothing as they are beset by customs officers, thieves, murderers and rapists. The film -- the first feature-length film to show at the festival -- deals with "the bravery of women," Traore told AFP at the festival in the Burkinabe capital Ouagadougou. "There is a...
(AFP (eng) 02/24/17)
The jagged, ice-capped Rwenzori Mountains stab at the sky above Mpondwe, a bustling border town in western Uganda. Trucks move slowly and one at a time across a rickety metal bridge above the swirling, muddy Lhubiriha River and into the neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo where, traders say, profits can be found but fear lurks. "We have no worries here, but our concern is the security over there," says Henry Bwambale, a 34-year-old business leader in Mpondwe, gesturing to the west. Traders tell of violent highway robbery and worse on the roads to the Congolese towns of Butembo and Beni, he says.
(Reuters (Eng) 02/24/17)
Uganda is holding dozens of fighters from the M23 rebel group who fled the Democratic Republic of Congo after clashing with troops there this week, the Ugandan military said on Thursday. Richard Karemire, Uganda's military spokesman, told Reuters that 44 M23 fighters were being held at a camp in the southwestern town of Kisoro. He rejected accusations made by DRC that Uganda was enabling the fighters to revive their insurgency. "They fled and they are at a camp... pending determination of their next destination," he said. M23, the largest of a number of rebel movements that have sown chaos and bloodshed in mineral-rich eastern Congo for years, once controlled swathes of territory there. Hundreds of the group's fighters, however, fled...
(Xinhuanet 02/24/17)
East African Community (EAC) member states are fast tracking a comprehensive review of the Common External Tariff (CET) in order to protect infant industries, officials said on Friday. Kenya's Ministry of EAC Affairs, Labour and Social Protection Permanent Secretary Betty Maina said the EAC will review the criteria used in classifying goods that enter the EAC. "The intention of the review is to make the rules of trade facility as well as attract investments into the region," Maina said during the third EAC manufacturers' network meeting. "The review will also include reforms of duty remissions and exemptions schemes in order to create a fair play ground for manufacturers in the EAC partner states," she added. The two-day event brought together...
(AFP (eng) 02/23/17)
For the first time in Africa, researchers said Wednesday they have detected a malaria parasite that is partially resistant to the top anti-malaria drug, artemisinin, raising concern about efforts to fight a disease that sickens hundreds of millions of people each year. The discovery means that Africa now joins southeast Asia in hosting such drug-resistant forms of the mosquito-borne disease. Malaria infected more than 200 million people and killed some 438,000 people worldwide in 2015, most of them children in Africa. "The spread of artemisinin resistance in Africa would be a major setback in the fight against malaria, as ACT (artemisinin-based combination therapy) is the only effective and widely used antimalarial treatment at the moment," said lead author Arnab Pain,...
(Daily Monitor 02/22/17)
Entebbe — President Museveni has ordered the removal of royalties on gold in order to limit the amount of gold that is smuggled through Uganda unprocessed. He also said he wanted the tax lifted to encourage gold miners to take their gold the newly African Gold Refinery located in Entebbe. He said the tax was encouraging the smuggling of gold out of the country. "Therefore I am going to remove that royalty. The people of Mubende should bring our gold to the refinery. You were scared of the tax but now we have removed it. The royalty for those in transit has also been removed. There will be no excuse for anybody not to bring their gold to the refinery,"...
(Xinhuanet 02/22/17)
Africa Energy Indaba, the continent's premier energy event, kicked off in Johannesburg on Monday with the aim of finding solutions to the continent's energy future. The three-day conference is being attended by the governments' representatives, business and funders. The meeting seeks to unleash the continent's potential by coming up with an energy mix to develop Africa. Dr. Garth Strachan, Deputy Director General and Head of Gas Industrialization Unit in South Africa's Department of Trade and Industry said the recent discoveries of gas in Mozambique, Angola and Tanzania provides a huge opportunity for the continent. He said there is a need for the countries to work together to tap benefits from the gas for the good of the continent. Strachan said...
(AFP (eng) 02/21/17)
Ugandan authorities have seized more than a tonne of ivory, chopped into small pieces and treated with a chemical intended to prevent it being detected, the national wildlife protection service said Monday. The haul was made in a Kampala suburb on Saturday, before it could be loaded at Entebbe international airport and flown off to an unknown destination, the authorities said. A Liberian and two suspects from Guinea Bissau have been arrested in Kampala, Uganda's wildlife authority spokesman Simplicious Gessa told AFP. "In a joint operation with police, we recovered over 1000 kg of ivory suspected smuggled from either Tanzania or Democratic Republic of Congo and the operation is ongoing," Gessa said.
(Bloomberg 02/21/17)
Ashish Thakkar, who co-founded Africa banking conglomerate Atlas Mara Ltd. with ex-Barclays Plc head Bob Diamond, lost a ruling over the ownership of family assets in a London divorce case, with a judge questioning Thakkar’s truthfulness. Judge Philip Moor ruled that Thakkar, and not his mother and sister, was the owner of disputed assets in the divorce. He found that the 35-year-old owned 100 percent of Mara Group Holdings Ltd. and other corporate entities. The result will have ramifications in the proceedings where a judge will have to decide how much Thakkar -- described in videos posted on his foundation’s website as "Africa’s Youngest Billionaire" -- is worth. Thakkar says he has assets of 445,532 pounds ($553,000) while his wife,...
(Daily Monitor 02/16/17)
Government aided schools, in a rampage, are arbitrarily increasing tuition and non-tuition fees. Speaker of Parliament Rebecca Kadaga blames this to low enrolment and wastage of children's talents, vowing to block further increases. Ms Kadaga said hiking of fees piles burdens on her, with children swarming into her office for financial assistance for their school dues. The rest that don't have the means, she said, end up wasting away into criminality. "It beats my understanding what these funds are for. Many children are being wasted. We shall convey this petition to the relevant committee and action shall be taken," She said, adding, "All the schools pay for building funds but you never see any building being erected." Ms Kadaga had...
(Xinhuanet 02/16/17)
South Sudan and Uganda have agreed to conduct joint border surveillance exercise in an effort to combat the spread of the avian flu that was reported in Kampala in January, a South Sudanese official said Thursday. Meanwhile, Minister of Livestock and Fisheries James Janka Duku said South Sudan would not ban imports of Ugandan poultry products. The minister said the two countries have agreed to deploy health experts along the Uganda-South Sudan border to monitor and inspect Ugandan poultry products. He said under the new guidelines, all bird products must undergo background checks and traders must have valid export certificates issued by the joint task force. Duku said a team of technical experts from South Sudan would be dispatched to...
(Daily Monitor 02/16/17)
Kampala — Energy minister Irene Muloni, disclosed Tuesday, that government has given the three oil joint venture (JV) partners, France's Total E&P, UK's Tullow Oil and China'c Cnooc, up to December 31 as deadline for closing Final Investment Decision (FID) on proposed investments in the next development and production phases leading to Uganda's first oil. Ms Muloni also reiterated that government remains on first commercial oil starting flowing four years from now - a date which is somewhat impractical given the amount of work that remains undone. With financial aid taps lately getting drier the government wants oil revenues more than ever before and on which they are borrowing heavily as a guarantee. "As government we are very anxious and...
(The Associated Press 02/16/17)
Uganda’s government has deployed scores of troops to Equatorial Guinea under an agreement to train the West African country’s troops, a military official said Thursday. Between 100 and 150 troops had been sent after the agreement was signed between the two countries at the start of this year, military spokesman Brig. Richard Karemire told The Associated Press. The government of Equatorial Guinea hopes the “training and monitoring” team from Uganda will work toward reaching “a certain level of professionalism” among the Guinean armed forces. The Ugandans will be stationed in the West African country for at least a year but could stay longer, he said. Uganda and oil-rich Equatorial Guinea are led by two of the world’s longest-ruling presidents, and...
(Daily Monitor 02/16/17)
Serere — A day after Daily Monitor published a story about the Shs2 billion stalled World Bank-funded Serere fishing project, State House has announced they have commenced investigations into the matter beginning next month. Mr Dan Mulalu, the private secretary in charge of political affairs and mobilisation at the Office of the President, told Daily Monitor in an interview on Tuesday that the ministry of Agriculture must explain why a big project that directly falls under their docket was abandoned despite government spending money on it to benefit the population. "State House has just learnt of the fraud and we are going to bring the matter to the attention of the President," Mr Mulalu said, adding that they are soon...
(Xinhuanet 02/15/17)
The Ugandan military has sent a team of 100 officers to Equatorial Guinea to help build capacity and professionalization of the west African nation's army, a spokesperson said here on Tuesday. Brig. Richard Karemire, Uganda's military spokesperson, told Xinhua by telephone that the Uganda People's Defense Force (UPDF) training and mentoring team will help in training, equipping and building capacity in a bid for the country to have a professional army. The group under the leadership of Lt. Col. Wycliff Keita will be in the west African country for one year under a bilateral agreement and a Pan Africanism cause.
(AFP (eng) 02/15/17)
Sub-Saharan Africa, where more than a half billion people live without electricity, trails the world in government policies that promote sustainable energy, according to a new World Bank report Wednesday. Much of the rest of the world, however, has made strides toward making energy broadly available, developing renewable power sources and increasing efficiency, the inaugural Regulatory Indicators for Sustainable Energy report said. In a survey of 111 countries, the World Bank found that through 2015 nearly 80 percent had begun to adopt policies to expand electrical grids, connecting them to solar and wind generation, and to help make electric utilities creditworthy and financially viable while keeping energy prices down. More than a third of countries, home to 96 percent of...

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