Wednesday 18 April 2018
(Dw-World 11/28/13)
Christian Mukosa of Amnesty International says the international community should act now to stop human rights violations in the Central African Republic. He hails France's plan to send more troops to CAR. Late last month (October 2013) the rights group Amnesty International warned that the human rights crisis in the Central African Republic was spiraling out of control. It has also published satellite images showing the aftermath of abuses, including hundreds of homes that had been burnt to the ground. DW: How would you describe the state of the Central African Republic? Christian Mukosa: The situation is very grave in Central African Republic. There are serious human rights violations including mass killings, rape and other types of violence against women...
(Washington Post 11/28/13)
The warnings have become more dire: The Central African Republic “is descending into complete chaos before our eyes,” the U.N. deputy secretary general said this week. France, the country’s former colonial power, pledged Tuesday to send 1,000 troops there after declaring last week that the situation was “on the verge of genocide.” Something terrible is happening in this country in the middle of Africa. Hundreds of thousands of people have fled their homes, and an unknown number have been killed in attacks over the past several months. Post correspondent Sudarsan Raghavan, based in Nairobi, helps explain the crisis and why world powers are suddenly so concerned. ● How did the fighting start? In March, a rebel alliance called the Seleka...
(AFP (eng) 11/28/13)
LIBREVILLE, November 28, 2013 (AFP) - The motley crew of fighters who overthrew the Central African Republic's government in March are raging beyond their leader's control, terrorising civilians and pushing the country toward civil war, analysts say. The Seleka rebels -- a loose band of veteran insurgents who picked up mercenaries, robbers and an assortment of other violent men on the way -- have continued their rampage despite being officially dissolved by the man they installed as president, Michel Djotodia. What started as a movement to oust then-president Francois Bozize has gone off-script, the mostly Muslim Seleka fighters burning and pillaging villages, the majority Christian population responding with their own militias that have themselves killed innocent Muslims in reprisal. "These...
(CNN 11/28/13)
(CNN) -- France will send approximately 1,000 more troops to the Central African Republic, French Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said Tuesday in a radio interview. Speaking on Europe 1 radio, he said the mission would last about six months and would be coordinated with the United Nations and African Union. About 400 French troops are already in the Central African Republic, the French Defense Ministry said, where they are deployed to protect French nationals and help secure the airport in the capital, Bangui. France is a former colonial power in the Central African Republic. Former leader Gen. Francois Bozize fled the country in March of this year, after a coup led by rebel leader Michel Djotodia. A transitional government...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/28/13)
PARIS---(Reuters) - A planned French intervention backing regional troops in Central African Republic will focus first on securing key trade routes and population hubs to stop "acts of revenge", a French defense ministry source said on Wednesday. France is preparing to increase its force in its anarchic former colony to at least 1,000 soldiers once a United Nations resolution is passed next week to try to prevent sectarian violence from destabilizing the wider region. The landlocked mineral-rich nation of 4.6 million people at the heart of Africa has descended into chaos since the Seleka coalition of rebels, many of them from neighboring Chad and Sudan, ousted President Francois Bozize in March. Seleka leader Michel Djotodia, installed as an interim president,...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/28/13)
AMSTERDAM/NEW YORK---(Reuters) - The International Criminal Court's member states on Wednesday agreed to changes to the court's trial procedures that could help defuse tensions between the court and the African continent regarding the approaching trial of Kenya's president. The changes approved by the court's 122 members will make it easier for suspects to participate in trial proceedings via video link and create a special exemption for top government officials, Western diplomats said. Kenya and its African Union allies have been lobbying hard for the trial of Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta to be halted or postponed, saying the case threatens to destabilize the East African region. Kenyatta and his deputy, former political rival William Ruto, face charges of crimes against humanity...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/28/13)
Warsaw — For the past 20 years, negotiations on how to combat and adapt to climate change have been led by environmental ministers. But the decisions made affect a country's agriculture, energy and finance systems as well. Now, experts say, it's time for other players to be involved in the process, particularly when it comes to deciding how to most effectively spend available funds. "It is now clear that for effective implementation of projects under climate change finance, the environment, agriculture, energy and finance sectors must work as a team," said Ayalneh Bogale, the advisor for climate change and agriculture for the African Union Commission. At the just-ended UN climate negotiations in Warsaw, developed countries agreed to contribute $100 million...
( 11/28/13)
(IRIN) - Shocked by an escalation of killings, rapes and other abuses committed by Muslims against Christians, and vice versa, in the Central African Republic (CAR), leading clerics from both faiths recently travelled together to preach peace and listen to tales of horror. The level of violence, lawless and impunity that prevails in CAR - where a "human catastrophe of epic proportions is unfolding", according to Amnesty International - is so great that Archbishop Dieudonne Nzapalainga and Oumar-Kobine Layama, the country's leading imam, had to travel under an armed escort. The latest chapter in CAR's history of violence began in December 2012, when a coalition of predominantly Muslim rebel forces - known as Seleka - bolstered by mercenaries from neighbouring...
( 11/28/13)
Kisumu/Kampala — Even as food insecurity continues to afflict impoverished and disaster-affected populations around the continent, African policymakers and consumers remain deeply divided over the potential harms and benefits of genetically modified (GM) foods, which advocates say could greatly improve yields and nutrition. A recent study published in the journal Food Policy, titled Status of development, regulation and adoption of GM agriculture in Africa, shows that heated debates over safety concerns continue to plague efforts to use GM crop technology to tackle food security problems and poverty. Yet results from the four African countries that have implemented commercial GM agriculture - Burkina Faso, Egypt, South Africa and Sudan - suggest an improvement in productivity. In South Africa, a 2008 study...
(Los Angeles Times 11/27/13)
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- French officials said Tuesday that they would deploy troops to the Central African Republic amid reports of violent chaos and warnings that the country could be sliding toward a sectarian civil war. The French force would support African peacekeepers and wait for a United Nations resolution authorizing the deployment, expected next week, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius told French radio. Fabius last week warned that the country was on the verge of genocide. French Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told French radio Tuesday that the force would number about 1,000, but it was not clear whether the figure includes about 400 troops that France already has in the country's capital, Bangui. The French announcement came after...
(Le Parisien 11/27/13)
Après le Mali, la France s'apprête à intervenir en Centrafrique, pays en proie à l'anarchie depuis le renversement du président François Bozizé en mars. «Un millier de soldats» vont être déployés «pour une période brève, de l'ordre de six mois à peu près», a annoncé mardi Jean-Yves Le Drian. «La France accompagnera une force africaine déjà en cours de constitution, composée d'éléments militaires venus des pays voisins pour faire en sorte que ce massacre s'arrête», a précisé le ministre français de la Défense sur Europe 1. L'opération en Centrafrique «n'a rien à voir avec le Mali, a-t-il ajouté. Là, c'est l'effondrement d'un Etat et une tendance à l'affrontement confessionnel». Si la France prend soin de souligner qu'elle est «en appui»...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/27/13)
UNITED NATIONS ---(Reuters) - The U.N. Security Council is considering imposing an arms embargo on the virtually lawless Central African Republic as well as putting a travel ban on people undermining the country's stability, fueling violence and abusing human rights. The landlocked, mineral-rich nation of 4.6 million people has slipped into chaos since northern Seleka rebels seized the capital, Bangui, in March and ousted President Francois Bozize. Rights groups say both sides may have committed war crimes. France has drafted a resolution that would not only see the council establish its first new sanctions regime in 18 months but also authorize African peacekeepers and French troops to take all necessary measures to protect civilians, restore security and help re-establish state...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/27/13)
PARIS/BANGUI ---(Reuters) - France said on Tuesday it would increase its force in Central African Republic to at least 1,000 soldiers once a U.N. resolution is passed next week to try to prevent sectarian violence from destabilizing the entire region. The landlocked nation of 4.6 million people at the heart of Africa has descended into chaos since the Seleka coalition of rebels, many of them from neighboring Chad and Sudan, ousted President Francois Bozize in March. Seleka leader Michel Djotodia, installed as an interim president, has failed to control his mostly Muslim fighters, who have preyed upon the mainly Christian population, unleashing a wave of tit-for-tat killings. France, which presides over the 15-member U.N. Security Council in December, hopes a...
(Bloomberg 11/27/13)
Common vitamins plus selenium slowed illness in HIV patients in the early stage of their disease, according to a study suggesting the supplements may provide an effective, low-cost approach for delaying AIDS. Patients taking a daily combination of vitamins B, C and E along with selenium for two years were able to delay their need for antiretroviral therapies by about half compared with those given a placebo, according to research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study followed 878 HIV-infected adults from Botswana, a nation with one of the highest rates of infection of the AIDS virus. The findings are the first to show that vitamins and selenium can postpone illness in newly diagnosed HIV patients...
(Voice of America 11/27/13)
Douala — A few decades ago, rice was a luxury for rural Africa, a dish reserved for the big occasions like Christmas. The grain is now one of the most consumed staples south of the Sahara and experts predict surging urbanization will drive more demand for the cereal as consumer tastes increasingly tilt towards easy-to-cook convenience foods. Across Africa, rice currently knows no social or class boundaries. Increasingly, the grain ranks high on the menus of both rural and urban households. One consumer on the streets of Douala said, "I often buy a bag of rice for the family that will last about a month." Another added, "Three days out of seven, we eat rice at home. Sometimes, it's up...
(AFP (eng) 11/26/13)
PARIS, November 26, 2013 (AFP) - France's defence minister said Tuesday that Paris would deploy about 1,000 soldiers to Central African Republic for six months to support an African peacekeeping force. "France will support this African mission with about 1,000 soldiers," Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said on Europe 1 radio. Le Drian said French troops would act only "in support" of an African stabilisation force in Central African Republic "for a short period, in the range of about six months." Central African Republic Prime Minister Nicolas Tiangaye said after talks in Paris on Monday that Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius had talked of adding 800 troops to the 410 French soldiers already based in the capital, Bangui. Tiangaye said "serious...
(Voice of America 11/26/13)
French Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said on Tuesday the additional troops will deploy for about six months. ​France currently has about 400 soldiers based in the CAR's capital, Bangui. The overall peacekeeping force has about 2,500 of a planned total of 3,500 troops already in the country. The African Union will take over responsibility next month for the mission, which has been tasked with protecting civilians and restoring the central government's authority. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon laid out a range of options for the international community to support the country, including a proposal to convert the A.U. force into a U.N. peacekeeping mission. Ban said in a report earlier this month that the C.A.R. lacks a national authority able...
(Bloomberg 11/26/13)
France said it may triple its forces in Central African Republic as the United Nations warned the country is descending into “complete chaos” amid a growing number of atrocities against civilians. The French government is considering sending 800 additional troops to its former colony, Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said in an interview on France Culture radio today in Paris. UN Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson warned that urgent action is required from the international community to help protect the civilians. “The country faces a desperate security situation,” Eliasson told a Security Council meeting in New York yesterday. “The use of child soldiers is rising and sexual violence is growing. There are widespread reports of looting, illegal checkpoints, extortion, arbitrary arrests, torture...
(BBC News Africa 11/26/13)
The UN deputy secretary general has called for urgent action in the Central African Republic (CAR), warning it is descending into "complete chaos". Jan Eliasson urged the UN Security Council to strengthen the African Union-led force in the country ahead of a vote due next week. He said preparations should be made to turn the AU force into a UN peace-keeping operation. The CAR has been in turmoil since rebels seized power in March.Mr Eliasson said there had been an surge in sexual violence, torture, summary executions and sectarian violence between Muslims and Christians. "The CAR is becoming a breeding ground for extremists and armed groups in a region that is already suffering from conflict and instability," he said. "If...
(Voice of America 11/26/13)
UNITED NATIONS — The U.N. Security Council is considering options for stemming violence and restoring the state’s authority in the Central African Republic, including the possibility of deploying a U.N. peacekeeping mission. Warnings are coming from many quarters that the situation in the Central African Republic is on a downward spiral of lawlessness, humanitarian need, human rights abuses and a lack of governance that could have ramifications beyond its borders. The situation has been volatile and unstable since rebels from the Séléka coalition overthrew the government of President Francois Bozizé in March. Meanwhile, inter-communal tensions are simmering between Muslims and Christians, leading to attacks and reprisals. Currently, the regional group ECCAS (Economic Community of Central African States) plans to transition...

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