Sunday 10 December 2017
(BBC News Africa 10/23/13)
South Korea's largest tobacco company has promised to change an advertising campaign after accusations of racism. Posters promoting a new line of cigarettes featured pictures of monkeys dressed as news reporters, declaring "Africa is coming!" The cigarettes are part of a new This Africa line. The company, KT&G, says they contain African tobacco roasted and dried in a traditional fashion. The cigarette packets contain images of monkeys roasting tobacco.'Mocking Africa'. "We are deeply offended by KT&G's shameless and insulting use of this mocking imagery," said the African Tobacco Control Alliance in a statement calling for the withdrawal of the ad campaign, saying it was "at a minimum culturally insensitive". Cigarette ad featuring a monkey in South Korea Ads for This...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/22/13)
N'DJAMENA (Reuters) - Regional leaders on Monday authorized African troops deployed to Central African Republic to use force if necessary to drive foreign fighters out of the country, which has been plagued by violence. The Central African Republic, which is rich in minerals, has descended into chaos since mostly Muslim Seleka rebels ousted President Francois Bozize in March. Michel Djotodia, who swept to power at the head of the rebellion, has failed to control his former fighters, many of whom are mercenaries from Chad and Sudan, and the worsening violence has become sectarian in nature. An African Union force - soon to number 2,600 and made up of troops from neighboring states including Chad, Gabon, Congo Republic and Cameroon -...
(Voice of America 10/22/13)
The international human rights N-G-O, Light for the World, dedicated to empowering people with disabilities through community rehabilitation, announced an alliance that will focus on giving a voice to people with disabilities in developing nations. The group says it has received a declaration of support from its newly formed international board of ambassadors, who have pledged to work towards creating an inclusive society for people who are treated as outcasts because of a disability. Light for the World says on average persons with disabilities and households with a disabled member experience higher rates of deprivations including food insecurity, poor housing, and lack of access to water and sanitation. Gabriel Muller is director of public relations and international alliances for Light...
(Dw-World 10/21/13)
The violence in the Central African Republic is increasingly taking on religious overtones. Tens of thousands are fleeing, and at least 30,000 people are waiting for help in the town of Bossangoa alone - so far in vain. The signs of fighting are already visible 90 kilometers from Bossangoa, hometown of toppled President François Bozizé. There are burnt-out houses everywhere, with clothes and household objects lying strewn in front of them. Chickens, goats, and cows wander through abandoned fields and villages. The air is deadly silent, broken only by bird song. A few weeks ago, this spot, around 300 kilometers north of Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic, was the scene of fierce fighting between fighters for the Séléka...
(Dw-World 10/21/13)
The violence in the Central African Republic is increasingly taking on religious overtones. Tens of thousands are fleeing, and at least 30,000 people are waiting for help in the town of Bossangoa alone - so far in vain. Residents, who had found refuge in a nearby forest during clashes, go about their daily chores on October 8, 2013 after returning to Bangassou. The Central Africa Republic has been shaken by a recent increase in clashes between ex-rebels of the Seleka coalition that led the coup, who are Muslim, and local self-defense groups formed by rural residents who are Christian, in common with around 80 percent of the population. The poor but mineral-rich nation was plunged into chaos when a coalition...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/21/13)
ROME | Mon Oct 21, 2013 (Reuters) - More than 100 survivors of a shipwreck in which hundreds of African immigrants died burst through the gates of a holding center on the Italian island of Lampedusa on Monday in a protest against the refusal of authorities to allow them to attend a funeral ceremony for the victims. The survivors of the October 3 disaster tried to catch a ferry to the Sicilian city of Agrigento, where an official ceremony was held 200 km (125 miles) from the island, Italy's southernmost point. When an interior ministry official denied them permission to board the ferry, the protesters sat down in front of the tiny island's town hall, blocking a main roads. "One...
(The Guardian 10/21/13)
For too long the status quo has been to simply make knowledge available. But that's not enough, data must also be actionable. Nathaniel Manning reiterates the importance of open data. It is paramount to share data throughout the development sector, most importantly getting it into the hands of the technologists in the developing world. The sector would benefit tremendously by embracing a collaborative, open development model in which not only financial and human capital is shared with the developing world but also the rich value of information capital. Open data has a multiplier effect for development. The original work creates the benefit that it was specifically intended to do, and opening up the data produced from that work ignites entrepreneurship,...
(Sunday Independent 10/20/13)
Johannesburg - This week, for a second consecutive year, the Mo Ibrahim Foundation’s committee of eminent persons resolved there was no African leader deemed worthy of the $5 million (R49m) Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership. It is the fourth time there has been no winner in its seven-year history. As in previous no-awards years, the decision has been met with curiosity and derision. There’s no denying the prestige, if not the quantum, of the award for recipients. Comprising $5m over 10 years and $200 000 annually for life thereafter, as well as a possible $200 000 extra each year towards the winner’s philanthropic activities, it is a substantial award. Mo Ibrahim, the Sudanese-British mobile communications entrepreneur and billionaire,...
(Voice of America 10/19/13)
GENEVA — The United Nations says 1.6 million people in the Central African Republic are in urgent need of food, protection, health care and other life-saving services. Emergency directors from seven U.N. and two private agencies are in the midst of a three-day mission to assess the current situation and see how humanitarian aid can best be distributed in the country. Despite enormous difficulties, four U.N. agencies and dozens of international and national aid groups continue to provide humanitarian assistance to tens of thousands of needy people in the CAR. Jens Laerke, a spokesman for the U.N. Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, says more than 394,000 people have been forced to flee their homes since the country's current crisis...
(The New York Times 10/19/13)
FORT RILEY, Kan. — Here on the Kansas plains, thousands of soldiers once bound for Iraq or Afghanistan are now gearing up for missions in Africa as part of a new Pentagon strategy to train and advise indigenous forces to tackle emerging terrorist threats and other security risks so that American forces do not have to. The first-of-its-kind program is drawing on troops from a 3,500-member brigade in the Army’s storied First Infantry Division, known as the Big Red One, to conduct more than 100 missions in Africa over the next year. The missions range from a two-man sniper team in Burundi to 350 soldiers conducting airborne and humanitarian exercises in South Africa. The brigade has also sent a 150-member...
(Zimbabwe Independent 10/18/13)
The frosty relations between the International Criminal Court (ICC), which came into force on July 1 2002, and African leaders show signs of further deterioration with African leaders accusing The Hague of employing double standards against Africans. The conflict was sparked in July 2008 when the then prosecutor Moreno Ocampo applied for a warrant of arrest for Omar Al-Bashir, the sitting President of the Republic of Sudan. Al-Bashir was charged with war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide in the Darfur region of South Sudan. Since establishment, the office of the prosecutor (OTP) of the ICC has investigated eight cases involving alleged violations of international criminal law. Each of these investigations is related to situations in African countries, namely the...
(AFP 10/18/13)
LAGOS, 18 octobre 2013 (AFP) - Le Nigeria, les Etats-Unis, la Grande-Bretagne, l'Espagne et les Pays-Bas, ont mené ensemble vendredi des exercices militaires dans le cadre des efforts mis en place sur la scène internationale pour lutter contre la piraterie dans le Golfe de Guinée. Des gardes-côtes, des frégates, des navires de guerre et des hélicoptères ont pris part à l'exercice amphibie qui porte le nom de code "African wings" (les ailes de l'Afrique), au large de Lagos. Selon le vice-amiral de la marine nigériane Dele Joseph Ezeoba, qui s'est adressé à la presse depuis le site des opérations, l'exercice a pour but d'"envoyer un signal clair aux criminels présents dans nos eaux, que nous sommes fin prêts à les...
(Voice of America 10/18/13)
UNITED NATIONS — Five countries have won two-year terms on the U.N. Security Council, including two potentially controversial countries. U.N. General Assembly President John Ashe announced the winners of the secret ballot vote. “Chad, Chile, Lithuania, Nigeria and Saudi Arabia are elected members of the Security Council for a two-year term beginning on 1 January 2014,” he said. They will replace outgoing members Azerbaijan, Guatemala, Morocco, Pakistan and Togo. The seats are allocated regionally, and all five candidates had been agreed upon in advance within their regional groups, so they faced no competition. But they all were required to win a two-thirds majority approval of voting U.N. member states, which they did. Chad, Saudi Arabia and Lithuania have never served...
(Los Angeles Times 10/17/13)
Government forces in the Central African Republic have launched attacks against civilians as the country lurches dangerously toward violent chaos, according to the United Nations and humanitarian agencies. The latest warning came Wednesday from Doctors Without Borders. The group's physicians have treated dozens of people in recent weeks from shotgun and machete wounds after gunmen associated with the transitional Seleka government attacked villages in the country's northwest. The organization reported that violence had reached "unprecedented levels" in recent weeks. Last month the U.N. and Human Rights Watch warned of new clashes in the northwest and in the capital, Bangui, amid fears the country is on its way to being the world's next failed state. More than 310,000 people have fled...
(BBC News Africa 10/17/13)
Tens of thousands of people have been forced to flee "unprecedented levels of violence" in the Central African Republic, the medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) has said. It said its workers had seen appalling scenes of murder in a wave of attacks. Entire villages had been burnt to the ground and people have been treated for gunshot and machete wounds, MSF said. The mineral-rich but underdeveloped country has been in a state of chaos since rebels seized power in March. A rebel alliance known as Seleka, commanded by Michel Djotodia who is now president, ousted Francois Bozize from office. Last month, Mr Djotodia formally disbanded the rebels and integrated many fighters into the national army. However, rebels linked to...
(Voice of America 10/17/13)
NAIROBI — Tens of thousands of people have fled their homes because of violence in the Central African Republic, according to the medical aid organization Doctors Without Borders. Aid workers have also witnessed an execution and other atrocities as security deteriorates. Doctors Without Borders, known by its French initials MSF, reports violence has flared this month in the northwestern CAR, where government forces are battling local armed groups. Many civilians have fled towns and villages for the forest, where they live without adequate shelter and with little access to food and water. Head of Mission for MSF in the country, Ellen Van Der Velden, says civilians displaced around the town of Bossangoa, north of the capital, also are facing harsh...
(AFP (eng) 10/17/13)
BUCHAREST, October 17, 2013 (AFP) - The president of the International Criminal Court said Thursday it has never targeted any African country, calling such criticism "regrettable". "We never chased any African country, we didn't do anything in this respect, they brought their own situation to us," Korean judge Sang-Hyun Song told AFP, speaking in English. His comments were the ICC's strongest response yet to accusations by made by Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta at last week's African Union summit of "bias and race-hunting at the ICC". The African Union has called on the ICC to adjourn the crimes against humanity trials of Kenyatta and Kenya's Vice-President William Ruto. But Song strongly defended the court, speaking during a conference in Bucharest organised...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/16/13)
BANGUI | (Reuters) - France, whose troops this year halted an Islamist assault towards Mali's capital, is now in demand from another of its former African colonies. "Let's make up with the mother that feeds us! President Hollande we want your help!" read one banner as cheering locals welcomed France's foreign minister, Laurent Fabius, to Central African Republic at the weekend. Plunged into chaos since mostly Muslim Seleka rebels ousted President Francois Bozize in the mostly Christian country in March, the nation is facing sectarian violence, malnutrition and a near total collapse of state rule. Fearing their plight has been eclipsed internationally by conflicts in Syria and Mali, some see France as their best hope. "We've seen coups before, but...
(Dw-World 10/16/13)
The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership has no winner in 2013 - for the fourth time in five years. The award, set up by Sudan-born telecoms tycoon Mo Ibrahim in 2007, goes to a democratically elected African leader who demonstrated exceptional leadership, served their mandated term and left office in the last three years. It carries a $5 million (3.7 million euro) prize paid over 10 years and $200,000 annually for life from then on, with a further $200,000 per year available for 10 years for good causes backed by the winner. The London-based Mo Ibrahim foundation also publishes the Ibrahim Index of African Governance. Deutsche Welle spoke to a former award winner and president of Botswana about...
(Times of swaziland 10/16/13)
MBABANE –The power of nutrition to transform individuals, societies and economies will be the highlight in today’s celebration to mark World Food Day. The UN World Food Programme (WFP) will further highlight the need to make nutrition central to all development efforts. WFP Country Director Heather Hill said the cost of hunger in the Swaziland study, published in July this year, showed that economic losses associated with under nutrition total E783 million annually. These results, Hill said, highlighted the need for all sectors including education, health, agriculture, finance and social affairs to consider the benefits, both social and economic of prioritising child nutrition today and in the future. WFP has many years of collaboration in food security and nutrition with...

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