Saturday 25 November 2017
(The Associated Press 08/23/17)
UNITED NATIONS — U.N. humanitarian chief Stephen O'Brien said Tuesday he saw "the early warnings of genocide" during a recent visit to Central African Republic, which has faced sectarian fighting since 2013. He said in an interview with The Associated Press that "there's a terrible development of militias now using ethnic or religious" reasons for attacks. He spoke with AP after briefing the U.N. Security Council on his trip behind closed doors at the request of France. During a visit to the southeastern town of Bangassou last month, O'Brien said, he saw 2,000 Muslims trapped in a Catholic church where they fled after their homes were burned by mostly Christian anti-Balaka militiamen who were "just lying in wait to kill...
(APA 08/23/17)
World football governing body FIFA is threatening to ban the Central African Republic from all competitions if it does not pay Jules Accorsi, a former coach of the national team CFA 996 million in salary arrears by September 1st. FIFA also warned CAR that it could also face a four-year ban from competitions organized by the Confederation of African Football (CAF) in addition to fines. The amounts for the latter penalties have not been revealed. Accorsi who coached the “Fauves de Bas Oubangui” from 2009 to 2012 had not been paid his wage for several months. The salary arrears are estimated at CFA 120 million. The CAR football federation has met only CFA 25 million of their financial obligations towards...
(Xinhuanet 08/23/17)
China is dedicated to enhancing its cooperation with Africa in human resource development through knowledge and technology transfer, a Chinese diplomat said Tuesday. Liu Tao, Charge d'Affaires of the Chinese Embassy in Ethiopia, made the remarks at the Chinese Government Training Program Fellowship Reception in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa. He said China, since the year 2000, has sent over 2,000 agricultural experts and over 7,000 medical personnel to Africa, and has trained more than 80,000 Africans from more than 50 countries. China has pledged that it would, in three years, train 200,000 technicians and provide 40,000 training opportunities in China, and will offer 30,000 government scholarships, he said. Stating that 1,100 Ethiopian candidates are invited this year to attend short-term...
(Dw-World 08/22/17)
The government of the Central Africa Republic plans to hold further peace talks with rebel factions. But rights group, Human Rights Watch, wants rebel leaders to be held accountable for war crimes. Fresh deadly clashes hit several areas of the Central African Republic this week as international alarm grows over the spread of violence in the deeply troubled country. The clashes involved the majority Muslim rebel group Seleka and a predominantly Christian group Anti-balaka. In a letter addressed to the UN secretary General, António Guterres, six human rights organizations expressed grave concerns about the rapid deterioration of the security situation the country. Since the start of the year, more than 800 civilians have been killed. Lewis Mudge, a researcher with...
(AfricaNews 08/22/17)
Bria in the Central African Republic is once again experiencing clashes between anti-balaka and ex-seleka militants. The number of those killed still remains unclear for now. The presence of rival factions in Bria sparked the violence. Similar clashes have already killed some 300 people displacing nearly 40 000 others since June. Following decades of violence and instability since gaining independence, an insurgency in CAR led by the Seleka—a coalition of armed, primarily Muslim groups— resulted in the severe deterioration of the country’s security infrastructure and heightened ethnic tensions. In September 2013, anti-balaka forces began committing widespread revenge attacks
(Xinhuanet 08/22/17)
African officials on Monday called for urgent infrastructural development and regional integration to boost the continent's economy. At the Infrastructure Africa 2017 in Johannesburg, Zambian Minister of Finance Felix Mutati encouraged Africans to speedily address infrastructural deficit. "We have to inject some sense of urgency in ourselves. If we remain captured by business as usual, we are headed for disaster," said Mutati at the opening ceremony of the two-day event. "Competitiveness in Africa is being constrained by infrastructure deficit. We need about 93 billion U.S. dollars every year to address the infrastructure gap in the continent. We need to urgently implement projects," he said. Mutati said Africa has to narrow focus to innovative financing and design, better use of existing...
(AFP (eng) 08/21/17)
Thirteen people have been killed in a town in Central African Republic, a local doctor said Sunday, as the toll from sectarian violence that has sparked fears of genocide continued to rise. The clashes took place in Bria, in the centre of the country 450 kilometres (280 miles) from the capital Bangui, between a majority Muslim rebel group and a predominantly Christian militia called the anti-Balaka. "Thirteen bodies were found on Saturday after violent fighting between self-defence forces and parts of Abdoulaye Hissene's FPRC," Michel Ambapo told AFP, referring respectively to the anti-Balaka and a faction of the rebel coalition known as the Seleka. "At least 20 wounded were admitted to hospital, most of them combatants on both sides and...
(Bloomberg 08/21/17)
GreenWish Partners, a renewable energy company run by a former Morgan Stanley executive, is planning to invest $800 million on solar-powered telecommunications towers across Africa. The project could fuel economic growth by providing power for essential services. Sub-Saharan Africa has the lowest rates of energy access in the world and is home to about half of the world’s 1.2 billion people without reliable electricity, according to the International Energy Agency. The problem extends to businesses as well as households, cutting into productivity and growth. “We reduce the total cost of power by 30 percent,” said Charlotte Aubin-Kalaidjian, the founder and chief executive officer of GreenWish, who was formerly a managing director at Morgan Stanley Investment Management. “Smaller towers can run...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/19/17)
West and Central Africa is the most volatile region in the world for aid workers, accounting for more than half of attacks on humanitarians worldwide this year, aid agencies said on Friday. Worsening militant violence across the region has seen aid workers attacked on nearly 200 occasions in Central African Republic, more than 115 in Mali and about 75 in the Democratic Republic of Congo, U.N. agencies and humanitarian groups said. "The deteriorating trend in these countries ... is extremely worrying," said Noel Tsekouras, regional representative for the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). "Our staff and volunteers too often risk their own lives when coming...
(AFP (eng) 08/19/17)
Jonas Ngobo can still clearly see the bloodshed and devastation left when rebels attacked a Red Cross health centre in the Central African Republic where he worked. "I was among the dead and injured", the 54-year-old Ngobo said. Six of his colleagues died in the violence in the southern town of Gambo, near the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo, when members of a group called the Union for Peace in Central Africa (UPC) invaded the facility. The UPC is part of a Muslim-majority rebel coalition called the Seleka which briefly held power when it deposed President Francois Bozize in 2013 before they themselves were overthrown by a military intervention led by former colonial ruler France. Those events sparked...
(AFP (eng) 08/16/17)
Aid groups have called on the United Nations to take "immediate action" in the Central African Republic, saying the conflict-wracked nation is "teetering on the brink of catastrophe". In a letter addressed to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and published Tuesday, six humanitarian organisations expressed their "grave concern about the rapid deterioration of the security situation" in the country. We "request your office take immediate action to prevent the country collapsing into another full-blown conflict", the letter said, adding that "at least 821 civilians have been killed since the start of the year."
(RFI(EN) 08/16/17)
Central Africans fleeing the violence sometimes get caught up in it. Ex-Seleka and anti-Balaka militias abduct, rape, steal and kill people trying to get across the border to the safety of Chad. Read more at: http://en.rfi.fr/africa/20170816-while-fleeing-central-african-republic-...
(Bloomberg 08/14/17)
The U.S. will probably maintain its current levels of aid to Africa despite President Donald Trump’s proposals to slash funding, according to Bill Gates, the world’s richest man. Trump said in May his government would no longer allocate funding for family planning, a move that has the potential to undermine aid programs in the poorest countries in the world. However, with Congress in control of the budget, it’s unlikely that all cuts proposed by the Trump administration will go ahead next year, Gates said in an interview in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s commercial capital. “It’s quite clear that they won’t make those drastic cuts,” Gates said. “I’m hopeful they won’t make any cuts at all, but that’s still subject to...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/11/17)
DAKAR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Thousands of people uprooted by violence in Central African Republic are taking refuge in a hospital after armed groups looted and burned a camp for the displaced, medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) said on Thursday. At least 10,000 people are staying on the grounds of the hospital in the town of Batangafo - 400 kilometers (250 miles) north of the capital Bangui - nearly two weeks after fighting broke out between rival groups, according to the charity. The camp for the displaced was attacked and several aid groups were looted during two waves of violence which left 24 people dead and 17 injured as of the start of August, MSF said. "The people taking...
(AFP (eng) 08/10/17)
The skull of an infant ape buried by a volcano 13 million years ago has preserved intriguing clues about the ancestor humans shared with apes -- including a likely African origin, scientists said Wednesday. A previously-unknown creature that shared an extended family with the human forefather, had a flat face like that of our far-flung cousin the gibbon, but did not move like one, its discoverers wrote in the journal Nature. They named it Nyanzapithecus alesi after "ales" -- the word for "ancestor" in the Turkana language of Kenya, where the lemon-sized skull was unearthed. The sole specimen is that of an infant that would have grown to weigh about 11 kilogrammes (24 pounds) in adulthood. It had a brain...
(AFP (eng) 08/09/17)
Six Red Cross workers were killed last week amid violent clashes in southern Central African Republic, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said Wednesday in an updated toll. The bloodshed occurred last Thursday at a health centre in Gambo, 70 kilometres (45 miles) from the town of Bangassou, where nine peacekeepers have been killed since early May, it said in a statement. The organisation on Tuesday gave a toll of three dead among its local staff, and said "dozens" of other people had also been killed. Concurring sources said the fighting was between so-called self-defence militias and members of a group called the Union for Peace in Central Africa (UPC), part of a Muslim-majority rebel organisation called the...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/09/17)
DAKAR (Reuters) - Six Red Cross volunteers were killed in an attack on a health center in southeast Central African Republic on August 3, the aid organization said in a statement on Wednesday. Civilians and medical staff may also have been killed in the attack, by unknown assailants, the Red Cross said, adding that more details were not yet available. Militia violence has intensified in southeast Central African Republic this year, including attacks on peacekeepers and aid workers, prompting fears of a possible return to large-scale chaos that gripped the country at the peak of a 2013 civil war. The six volunteers killed were all from Central African Republic and were participating in a crisis meeting at a health center...
(AFP (eng) 08/09/17)
Pope Francis on Wednesday denounced "shameful" attacks on Christians in Nigeria and the Central African Republic (CAR), calling for an end to "all hate and violence". "I have been profoundly saddened by the massacre last Sunday in Nigeria, inside a church, where innocent people were killed," the pontiff said at the end of his weekly public audience at the Vatican. "And sadly this morning we have news of violence in the Central African Republic against Christian communities. "I hope all forms of hate and violence will cease and such shameful crimes in places of worship, where the faithful are gathered to pray, will not be repeated," he added.
(AFP (eng) 08/09/17)
Witness reports of killings in the Central African Republic, some targeting aid workers, piled up Tuesday as the UN said it saw "early signs of a genocide" in the conflict-wracked nation. At least 60 people have been killed in recent weeks in fighting between armed groups in Ngaoundaye and Batangafo in the north, Kaga-Bandoro in the centre and Alindao and Gambo to the south, witnesses have told AFP. The fighting is largely between groups on opposing sides of the brutal conflict between Muslim and Christian militias that broke out in CAR in 2013 after President Francois Bozize was overthrown by a coalition of Muslim-majority rebel groups called the Seleka. Groups on both sides are now fighting for control of natural...
(The Associated Press 08/09/17)
Aid officials say six Red Cross volunteers have been killed in Central African Republic, the third deadly attack on the group in the country this year. Antoine Mbao-Bogo, president of the Central African Red Cross, said Wednesday he was "appalled" by news of the killings in the southeast. The circumstances of the attack were not clear, according to the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. The Red Cross says the volunteers were in Mbomou prefecture attending a crisis meeting at a health facility. Many humanitarian workers have been blocked from doing their work during the latest surge in largely sectarian violence in Central African Republic. Militants also have tried to kill wounded enemies in public health facilities.

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