| Africatime
Sunday 01 May 2016
(Voice of America 04/30/16)
More than 200 people, including three African presidents, attended the opening of a three-day summit Friday near Mount Kenya, where activists and officials have gathered to discuss the future of Africa’s elephants and their habitats. Poaching has escalated to alarming heights in recent years, as 100,000 African elephants were killed between 2010 and 2012 alone. Tens of thousands continue to be poached every year across the continent. The goal of the event is to find ways to stop the slaughter of Africa’s elephants, protecting at least 50 percent of these animals and their landscapes by 2020. And to do so, conservationists say that government leaders must flex their political muscle in support of the cause...
(African arguments 04/29/16)
As Africa finds its voice after centuries of being silenced, well-intentioned outsiders must be careful to help and not hijack this moment. Just back from the Tana Forum on Peace and Security, held in the sleepy town of Bahir Dar on the shores of Ethiopia's Lake Tana, my head churns with questions about how African debates like this should be organised. Should they be held under a Baobab tree or in international hotels? Should they be formal or informal? Should they emulate Western or Asian styles or ignore them altogether? And ultimately, after centuries in which African voices have rarely been heard - from slavery, through colonialism, and up to the present day - who should now talk for Africa...
(Forbes 04/29/16)
I write about how innovation is better in Africa. Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. “If we can prove our basic supposition that children can learn to read, write and do math on their own, and with each other using only technology, the positive results will be global and exponential.” – XPRIZE’s Matt Keller. Having propelled humanity to the edge of space, the XPRIZE now hopes to inspire education for hundreds of millions of children, starting with a...
(AFP (eng) 04/28/16)
The body of Congolese "rumba king" Papa Wemba arrived home in Kinshasa on Thursday, where it was greeted by a huge crowd of distraught fans after the musician's collapse during a show in Ivory Coast. His body was flown home after an all-night musical tribute in Ivory Coast to the legendary African music star, who died on Sunday at the age of 66 during a show in Abidjan. The white coffin draped in the Democratic Republic of Congo flag was received by Prime Minister Augustin Matata Ponyo and parliament speaker Aubin Minaku before being taken off in a hearse.
(BBC News Africa 04/28/16)
The body of Papa Wemba, one of Africa's best known singers, is being flown back to Democratic Republic of Congo after his death on Sunday in Ivory Coast. Hundreds of people are outside Kinshasa's airport waiting for his body to arrive. An all-night concert has been held in his honour in Abidjan, the city where he collapsed and died on stage. He is due to be buried on Tuesday after lying in state in a stadium in the DR Congo...
(Voice of America 04/28/16)
Press freedom declined in Africa and around the world in 2015, according to a new report by the monitoring and advocacy group Freedom House. The worst clampdown on the African continent took place in Burundi, a Great Lakes nation where efforts by the president to extend his time in office beyond constitutional limits have pushed the country to the brink of civil war. There, journalists have been imprisoned, beaten and killed and nearly all independent media outlets have been shut down. Worldwide, press freedom dropped to the lowest recorded level in 12 years, Freedom House said.
(BBC News Africa 04/28/16)
The call for better management of sport is heard across Africa - often as a lament, more regularly as an outburst of barely contained frustration. In football, former Ajax and Juventus defender Sunday Oliseh recently quit as Nigeria's national football coach, citing contractual violations and lack of support from his local federation. Months earlier, Zimbabwe were disqualified from the 2018 World Cup qualifying tournament after its football association failed to pay a former national coach. In athletics, Kenya only recently...
(Washington Post 04/27/16)
The pejorative phrase “Go back to Africa” made news last month when hurled at protesters at Donald Trump rallies. At the canceled rally on the campus of the University of Illinois–Chicago on March 11, protestor Jedidiah Brown was irate after he was allegedly told to “go back to Africa” by a Trump supporter. A natural-born American citizen, Brown said he had never been to Africa and therefore no one had the right to tell him to go back to a...
(Reuters (Eng) 04/26/16)
Elephant poachers killed three rangers in Democratic Republic of Congo's Garamba wildlife park and wounded two other people including the Swedish park manager, environmental officials said. One of the rangers was found dead near the site of the Saturday attack, said African Parks, which manages the UNESCO world heritage site. U.S. forces in the area evacuated the others, but two of them died of their injuries a day later at a military base in neighboring Central African Republic, the organization added. The survivors were in a stable condition.
(BBC News Africa 04/26/16)
Music fans across Africa are mourning the death of Papa Wemba, the musician from the Democratic Republic of Congo who died at the age of 66 after collapsing on stage on Sunday morning. Stars have been paying tribute to a man whose music influenced artists from around the continent. I'm sad, and I've been struggling since the death of Prince and now we have the passing of Papa Wemba and I'm wondering what this is all about. I worked with...
(Financial Times 04/26/16)
This is likely to be the first year this millennium when Africa grows more slowly than the rest of the world, the IMF predicts. With the respected Ibrahim Index of African Governance suggesting that standards of governance have declined since the global financial crisis, and the IMF having warned that too few countries used the boom years to improve their public finances, a picture emerges of a continent that has largely squandered its commodity-led windfall. The recent slowdown has also...
(AfricaNews 04/25/16)
His last stage performance was at the Urban Musical Festival Anoumabo (FEMUA) in Ivory Coast’s city Abidjan. Soon after performing three songs, the 66- year-old star, Papa Wemba collapsed on stage and was later declared dead. The Ivorian government has sent its condolences to the Democratic Republic of Congo, saying Wemba’s passing was a great loss. I have the honor and sorrow to salute the memory of Papa Wemba, he came to lend his support to FEMUA. The Ivorian presidency...
(Punch 04/25/16)
Ivory Coast will host an all-night concert tribute this week to Congolese rumba star Papa Wemba, who died after collapsing on stage during a festival in Abidjan, organisers said Monday. Family members were also heading to the Ivory Coast to prepare to repatriate Papa Wemba’s body to his homeland, where Culture Minister Banza Makalay described his death as “a great loss for music”. Papa Wemba, one of the biggest names in African music for the past 40 years, died after...
(Voice of America 04/25/16)
Foreign policy almost always takes a back seat to domestic concerns during the U.S. presidential campaign season. Candidates rarely win over any voters in diners in New Hampshire or town hall events in Iowa touting their plans for economic investment and security frameworks in Africa. In 1999, then-candidate George W. Bush went so far as to declare Africa “irrelevant” to U.S. foreign policy during his first presidential run.
(The New Times 04/23/16)
The apparent end to the commodity super-cycle has sent shockwaves across the global economy. It has sparked turbulence in world stock markets, put pressure on currencies, and fuelled major concerns about prospects for growth and the stability of public finances. Africa has not escaped this pessimism. Questions have been asked about the continent's economic future, with widespread fears that the remarkable gains of the last two decades could be reversed. The mood reminds me of the IMF/World Bank meetings I...
(Reuters (Eng) 04/22/16)
Nobel-prize nominated Congolese gynecologist Denis Mukwege, who treats war rape victims, was named by TIME magazine on Thursday as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. The 61-year-old doctor founded the Panzi Hospital in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in 1999 to help women and girls who had been raped during the conflict then raging in the country. "The people on the list, each in their own way, have lessons to teach," TIME editor Nancy Gibbs...
(Xinhuanet 04/22/16)
KINSHASA, April 22 (Xinhua) -- The Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo) government has since 2012 invested over 4 billion U.S. dollars in the country's social plan, Prime Minister Matata Ponyo has said. "The social fabric benefited with over four billion U.S. dollars, equivalent to 28 percent of the national budget," Ponyo told parliament. Ponyo claimed his administration's efforts had resulted in considerable drop in poverty, reduced incidents of severe malnutrition and increased purchasing power from the public. He said...
(Xinhuanet 04/22/16)
KIGALI, April 22 (Xinhua) -- Rwandan soldiers did not cross into the Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo) last weekend as reported, the army said. Military authorities in DR Congo said Tuesday Rwandan soldiers intruded into the eastern part of the country in search of the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR) rebels. But Lieutenant Colonel Rene Ngendahimana, deputy spokesman for the Rwandan army, denied the reports. "These are false allegations. Rwandan soldiers never crossed the border into...
(Zimbabwe Independent 04/22/16)
The year 2015 has been an annus horribilis for several economies in Africa. First, currencies across the board have depreciated dramatically against the dollar. Second, prices of almost all major commodities have crashed, which has had huge impact on government revenues. Third, China’s slowdown has put a damper on Africa’s economic growth. As a result, Africa’s economy will grow by 3,75% — lower than the 5% average of the last decade — and is expected to grow slightly higher in...
(Standard Digital 04/22/16)
Afrobarometer, a pan-African, non-partisan research network, recently released a report highlighting Africa’s electricity challenges. Power shortages can hamper socioeconomic development, but they also have implications for health and education. The electricity crisis in Africa is serious. One of the most glaring disparities is that across the 36 countries surveyed, 94% of urban dwellers have access to the electric grid, whereas only 45% do in rural areas. The urban-rural divide is most pronounced in Guinea, Mali and Niger. This suggests that...

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