Wednesday 20 September 2017
(AFP (eng) 09/16/13)
KIGALI, September 16, 2013 (AFP) - Rwandans voted in parliamentary elections Monday, with the central African nation's strongman Paul Kagame predicting a solid win for his ruling Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF). The RPF has dominated Rwanda since ousting Hutu extremists and ending the genocide nearly 20 years ago, and has overseen the country's dramatic transformation from trauma to economic success story. Analysts say the RPF faced no serious opposition, with only a handful of small parties or independent candidates hoping to scrape a few seats in parliament, and prominent opposition figures sidelined. At the school where President Paul Kagame cast his vote security was tight, with a sniffer dog on hand to inspect bags and security checks for voters going...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/16/13)
KIGALI | Mon Sep 16, 2013 (Reuters) - Rwandans voted in a parliamentary election on Monday that is widely expected to hand an easy win to the ruling coalition in a national assembly that may be asked to change the constitution to allow President Paul Kagame a third term. The rebel commander-turned-statesman has sidestepped questions over whether he will run for office again. But there has been a run of articles in pro-government papers in recent months quoting supporters calling for an extension. Two decades on from the 1994 genocide, Rwanda is a poster-child for foreign investment in Africa, but political opponents and human rights groups accuse Kagame, 55, of trampling on the opposition and stifling dissent. "We all know...
(AL Jazeera 09/16/13)
The votes are projected to bolster President Paul Kagame's ruling party. Rwandans are voting in parliamentary polls with President Paul Kagame's Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) as the forerunner. Out of the 80 seats in parliament, 53 are directly elected and 24 are reserved for women, the youth and handicapped -- who are indirectly appointed by local and national councils on Tuesday and Wednesday. Some six million people are eligible to cast their ballots in the voting on Monday, with turnout expected to be robust despite a low-key campaign and serious opposition to the RPF. This configuration has ensured that Rwanda has the only parliament in the world where women are in a majority -- 56.3 percent after the last elections...
(The New Times 09/16/13)
Ministers from Uganda, Kenya and Rwanda have approved the use of national identity cards as travel documents and the issuance of a single tourist visa. They made the endorsement at the end of a two-day meeting that sought to iron out issues under the tripartite arrangement. The meeting ended Friday in Kigali. During the Heads of State Summit in Entebbe, Uganda, in June, Rwanda was assigned to spearhead single tourism visa, use of IDs as travel documents as well as single customs territory. The ministers adopted the use of entry coupon that will accompany the identity cards. The coupon will act as an entry stamp. They also endorsed the design of the single tourist visa sticker.All the documents will be...
(AFP (eng) 09/16/13)
KIGALI, September 16, 2013 (AFP) - Rwandans were voting Monday in parliamentary polls seen as a shoo-in for President Paul Kagame's Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF), the party that has held sway over the central African state since ending the genocide 20 years ago. Voters cast ballots in polling booths that in the capital were draped in the sky blue, green and yellow of the Rwandan flag, with some playing music. Some six million people are eligible to cast their ballots before polling stations close in mid-afternoon. Cars with loudspeakers cruised the pristine streets of the capital, neatly lined with palm trees, reminding voters not to forget their ID cards. At the school where President Paul Kagame cast his vote security...
(New Vision 09/16/13)
Rwandan nationals in Uganda on Sunday participated in the parliamentary elections by casting their votes at the High Commission in Kampala. Officials of the National Electoral Commission (NEC) at the High Commission’s premises in Kitante oversaw the voting with assistance from youth volunteers who issued ballot papers and guided voters. Voting started at 7.00am local time (EAT) and had earlier been scheduled to end at 3.00pm local time. The polling station consisted of tents erected in the diplomatic mission’s compound where nationals arrived and went through a check-point before their names were crosschecked and then guided to the voting queue. Rwandan High Commissioner to Uganda Maj. Gen. Frank Mugambagye said that there are over 6,000 registered voters living in various...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/16/13)
KIGALI | (Reuters) - One person was killed and 14 wounded in a grenade blast in a market in the Rwandan capital on Friday, police said, the latest in string of such attacks over the past few years. There was a series of similar incidents in 2010 and at least three blasts last year. This was the third such incident in Kigali this year. Police said in statement published on their Twitter feed that three people had been detained in connection with the blast in Kicukiro market. It did not give further details, and police officers could not immediately be reached for comment. The motive for the attacks is not clear. Rwanda starts voting in its parliamentary election on Monday...
(This Day Live 09/16/13)
East Africa's poster boy of emerging markets, Rwanda, will be showcasing its tourism products at the forthcoming Akwaaba African Travel Market. The event, which is billed for October 27 to 29 in Lagos, will be a platform for Rwanda, recently rated as the most improved tourism destination in Africa, to reach the Nigerian audience. With its resurgent airline, Rwandair, positioning itself as one of the preferred Airlines in Africa, the country is blessed with a wonderful environment. Meanwhile, Namibia, one of Africa's most unique destinations, is set to expand its appeal to more West African travellers. The Namibian Ministry of Tourism and Environment and the Namibian Film commission will also be showcasing at Akwaaba. Air Namibia flies to Ghana and...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/16/13)
JERUSALEM | Mon Sep 16, 2013 (Reuters) - Israel's supreme court on Monday struck down a year-old law that meant African migrants could be held in detention for up three years without charge. The law, that came into force in June last year, was meant to deter illegal immigration but was condemned by human rights campaigners as a harsh and illegal way of treating people, especially those fleeing persecution and seeking asylum. A right-wing lawmaker said the court's ruling risked damaging the character of Israel - a state built on Jewish immigration - by opening the door to more Africans. Chief Justice Asher Grunis said the law contradicted Israel's legal guarantees of basic democratic freedoms, and "therefore, it ought to...
(Financial Times 09/15/13)
Future unrest is likely in sub-Saharan Africa if jobs cannot be created for the continent’s growing numbers of young people, the EU’s development chief has warned. Andris Piebalgs, European Commissioner for Development, said Africa contained the world’s greatest social problems. “The magnitude of the problem is immense and the challenges facing sub-Saharan African countries are huge,” he said in an interview with the Financial Times, adding that the region’s population is growing rapidly and half were under 25 years old. Mr Piebalgs, who spoke last week at an international youth job creation summit in London, said sub-Saharan Africa’s relatively low youth unemployment rate of 3 per cent, compared with the 50 per cent in some European countries, disguised the scale...
(The Globe and Mail 09/14/13)
When one of South Africa’s biggest newspaper chains was sold last month, an odd name was buried in the list of new owners: China International Television Corp. A major stake in a South African newspaper group might seem an unusual acquisition for Chinese state television, but it was no mystery to anyone who has watched the rapid expansion of China’s media empire across Africa. From newspapers and magazines to satellite television and radio stations, China is investing heavily in African media. It’s part of a long-term campaign to bolster Beijing’s “soft power” – not just through diplomacy, but also through foreign aid, business links, scholarships, training programs, academic institutes and the media. Its investments have allowed China to promote its...
(National Post 09/14/13)
Africa’s population will more than double to 2.4 billion within 40 years, thanks in large part to better health care, according to a major study. Sub-Saharan Africa’s population is rising faster than the rest of the world because modern medicine and health care on the continent means more babies are surviving birth complications, and fewer adults are dying from preventable diseases. But the number of children being conceived is not dropping, or is doing so very slowly. “This means that population growth rates would naturally rise if birth rates stay as they are,” said Carl Haub, the co-author of the report by the U.S.-based Population Reference Bureau. African mothers currently give birth to an average of 5.2 children, rising to...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/13/13)
( Reuters) - They are often compared to Serge and Beate Klarsfeld, the activist couple who came to fame in 1960s tracking down Nazis from France. But Alain and Dafroza Gauthier have their sights on Rwanda's 1994 genocide. The pair have spent a decade searching for dozens of suspected accomplices of the massacre in the east African country who have since been living quietly in France. France has now agreed to stage the first trial of a 53-year-old former soldier accused of arming and guiding the killers. It is a victory for the Gauthiers and could help relations between the two countries as they try to strengthen economic and diplomatic ties although it could complicate them if the outcome does...
(Voice of America 09/13/13)
GENEVA — A new report says the number of global deaths among children under age five is almost half what it was 22 years ago. A joint report by the United Nations Children’s Fund, the World Health Organization,and World Bank finds about 6.6 million children died before reaching their fifth birthday in 2012 compared to 12 million children who died in 1990. The report calls the progress being made in cutting child deaths remarkable. However, it says this is still not good enough. It says most child deaths are preventable, and that by applying a number of simple, affordable measures, more children’s lives can be saved. Elizabeth Mason, director of the World Health Organization's department of maternal, newborn, child and...
(Voice of America 09/13/13)
NAIROBI, KENYA — In Africa, demand for the cassava plant has grown significantly over the years. The continent produces 60 percent of the crop in the world. But the crop is drastically declining in East and Central Africa due to diseases that reduce production. More than 160 million people in east, central and southern Africa depend on cassava as a stable food and a source of income. Production of the crop has significantly dropped due to the cassava mosaic and cassava brown streak diseases. According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO], the brown streak disease is worse since it affects the root of the crop. These two diseases are creating havoc in Africa’s agricultural lands.Improvements necessary. The acting...
(AFP (eng) 09/12/13)
DOUAI, September 12, 2013 (AFP) - A court in France on Thursday rejected a request from Rwanda for the extradition of an ex-colonel wanted in connection with the country's 1994 genocide and ordered his release. Laurent Serubuga, around 75 years old, was arrested near the northern French city of Cambrai in July under an international arrest warrant issued by Rwanda. Serubuga was the Rwandan army's deputy chief of staff during the April-July genocide in 1994 in which an estimated 800,000 people, mostly minority Tutsis, were killed by the ethnic majority Hutus. In rejecting the extradition request, the court in Douai in northern France said Serubuga cannot be prosecuted for genocide when the crime did not exist in the Rwandan criminal...
(Tanzania Daily News 09/12/13)
At clast, Tanzania and Rwanda have agreed on a harmonised user transit charge (road toll) of 152 USD per trucks plying between the two countries down from 500 USD. Finance Minister, Dr William Mgimwa, told the 'Daily News' that Tanzania agreed to the new rates to save the country from losses it was to incur from the lucrative transit trade. "Between 200 and 300 trucks cross to Rwanda while just 20 to 30 trucks enter Tanzania from Rwanda. Our traders were set to suffer most," Dr Mgimwa said in a telephone interview from Kampala, Uganda. Dr Mgimwa and Rwandan Minister for Finance and Planning, Ambassador Claver Gatete met in Kampala yesterday and reached the agreement. Amb. Gatete could not be...
(Sabahi 09/12/13)
Tanzania and Rwanda have agreed to lower toll rates for trucks crossing the Rusumo border between the two countries, Tanzania's The Citizen reported Wednesday (September 11th). Following negotiations between Tanzanian Finance Minister William Mgimwa and his Rwandan counterpart Claver Gatete in Kampala Tuesday, Tanzania lowered the rates from 809,000 shillings ($500) to 246,000 shillings ($152). "We finally realised that if we stuck to our guns, Tanzania was likely to suffer because our colleagues have fewer vehicles entering our country compared to our trucks headed to Rwanda," Mgimwa said. The Rwanda Revenue Authority has also agreed to return to its old rates, repealing the 809,000-shilling ($500) charge announced September 1st. The resolution is expected to alleviate the pile-up of traffic as...
(Voice of America 09/12/13)
Rwanda has asked the International Criminal Court to let it address the court in the trial of Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta and Deputy President William Ruto. “What we have done basically is to request the court to allow [us] to address it as a non-member of the Rome Statute, because we are not members of the Rome Statute,” said Rwanda’s Attorney General and minister of Justice, Busingye Johnston. “We think we can be of use to the court in terms of the interpretation of certain aspects regarding scheduling and the approach of the court to the planning and scheduling of matters.” Judges at the ICC have yet to decide on Rwanda’s petition. Rwanda is not a signatory to the Rome...
(Dw-World 09/12/13)
If German Chancellor Angela Merkel were standing for election in Africa in September, she would have a good chance of winning. But it's not all praise for Merkel and the German government. If it were up to the Mozambicans who were once contract workers in the former East Germany or "GDR", Chancellor Angela Merkel and her Christian Democratic Union (CDU) would win the upcoming elections. Germany goes to the polls on September 22, 2013. The Mozambican returnees, known as "Madgermanes", are convinced Merkel strengthened the German economy and successfully steered her country through the turmoil of the financial crisis. "Germany has remained Europe's largest economy under the Merkel government, even the global financial crisis did not affect it that badly,"...

Pages