Sunday 22 October 2017
(Voice of America 09/09/13)
The global community came tantalizingly close earlier this year to ridding the world of polio. But then in May, the eradication effort took a powerful blow. The virus turned up again in the Horn of Africa, first in Somalia. The Banadir region of Somalia, which includes a Mogadishu refugee camp, is thought to be the so-called “engine” of the Horn of Africa polio outbreak. In June, three-year-old Mohamed Naasir became ill. His mother, Khadija Abdullahi Adam, said soon after one leg became permanently disabled. “My son was fine, but he started having a high fever which lasted for almost four days," she explained. "I gave him medicine, but there was no change. The following morning he said to me ‘Mom,...
(Voice of America 09/09/13)
The Italian coast guard has rescued more than 700 people in the last two days from boats carrying migrants and refugees. Italian officials say four vessels got into difficulty in waters near Sicily. People from Syria, Egypt, Eritrea, Nigeria and Ghana were rescued. The Italian news agency ANSA reported Saturday that more than 207 people were taken to the island of Lampedusa after their rescue by the coast guard and navy. Among them were two women in the late stages of pregnancy. Another boat with 212 people aboard was being towed to Lampedusa. Two other broken-down boats carrying 293 people were taken to Augusta on Sicily's eastern coast. Violence in Syria and Egypt this year has spurred an increased number...
(AL Jazeera 09/07/13)
As Kenya votes to withdraw from this 'court of last resort', we ask if other African nations will follow suit. Kenya's parliament has voted to withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC), sending another strong message from the continent against what is perceived to be interference from the West. The motion was passed after an emergency session of parliament was convened - and the timing could not have been more telling. William Ruto, Kenya's deputy president, is due to appear before the ICC on September 10, on charges of crimes against humanity, while Uhuru Kenyatta, the Kenyan president, is scheduled to face similar charges in November. They stem from violence that broke out after disputed elections at the end of...
( 09/06/13)
Rwandan President Paul Kagame and his Tanzanian counterpart Jakaya Kikwete yesterday held closed door talks in Kampala, Uganda. The two leaders met on the sidelines of the seventh extraordinary summit of the Heads of State and Government of the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR) on the DRC crisis. Their meeting followed months of brewing tension between Rwanda and Tanzania after the suggestion by Kikwete that Kigali hold talks with the FDLR militia, which is responsible for the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. Yolande Makolo, communications director, Office of the President, described the meeting as "productive". "President Kagame and President Kikwete had a productive meeting today and are both pleased to be moving forward positively," she wrote on...
(New Vision 09/06/13)
Five regional Heads of State of Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda are meeting in Kampala today (Thursday) in an emergency meeting to find solutions to the fighting in eastern DR Congo. The foreign affairs ministry spokesperson, Elly Kamahungye, confirmed the arrival of Presidents Joseph Kabila (DR Congo), Salva Kiir (South Sudan), Paul Kagame (Rwanda) and Jakaya Kikwete (Tanzania). The emergency meeting comes a month after the Heads of State met in Nairobi to discuss the situation in eastern DRC following renewed fighting that has resulted in the death of UN soldiers serving under the intervention brigade. In his opening remarks during a closed meeting for ministers, Foreign Affairs minister Sam Kutesa said that the renewed...
(The Observer 09/06/13)
Presidents Museveni (Uganda), Uhuru Kenyatta (Kenya), and Paul Kagame (Rwanda) have strengthened their resolve to fast-track the East African political federation without two principals Burundi and Tanzania, emerging details from last week’s summit in Mombasa show. The meeting had been called to discuss infrastructure projects among the three countries, but at the sidelines of the meeting, the three leaders resolved to leave out their more cautious neighbours Tanzania and Burundi. But the state minister for East African Community Affairs, Shem Bageine, downplayed fears that the exclusion of Burundi and Tanzania would cause a diplomatic row in the region. “That was a consultation. It is not true that the member states agreed to move leaving out others,” he said of the...
(Business Day 09/06/13)
Multinational companies operating in Africa are hitting back at claims that government coffers are being eroded by deliberate intragroup mispricing and shifting of profits across borders to pay significantly less tax. Apart from a lack of clarity on what guidelines to use, reports of bribes to resolve tax disputes, poorly educated tax officials focusing only on their bonuses, and a lack of will to follow global guidelines are emerging. Governments are concerned that money they should be receiving is being diverted to other countries, which then receive the tax revenue. This is leading to major moves by tax authorities to ensure transactions between related companies or parties, such as employers and employees, are done at arm’s length. This means these...
(The Guardian 09/06/13)
Scheme could herald a 'green gold' revolution as mines commit to ban child labour, enforce safety rules and prevent toxic run off. In a bustling area of Nyarugusu, in the heart of Tanzania's gold lands, a stocky man is fanning a dustbin lid of smouldering charcoal, gold ore and mercury on the pavement. Each waft sends a cloud of toxic vapour into the faces of children and adults as they gather to watch. The burning of mercury is a common sight in the streets, homes and cottage-industry mines throughout east Africa. The liquid metal is used to extract the gold and then vaporised to leave behind flakes of the precious metal. But in this dangerous industry, seeds of a gold...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/05/13)
KIGALI | Thu Sep 5, 2013 (Reuters) - The deployment of a U.N. force of African troops in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo threatens to draw Rwanda into a damaging conflict with African powers and derail its economic "miracle" if donors again cut aid over Kigali's involvement there. President Paul Kagame has twice marched his troops over the border since Rwanda's 1994 genocide. One of the justifications he cited was his country's national security, the need to counter a threat Kigali said was posed by those behind the genocide who had found haven in eastern Congo. Rwanda, though, has usually managed to fend off criticism from Western allies who accuse Kigali of backing the M23 rebel group they say has...
(AFP (eng) 09/05/13)
KAMPALA, September 5, 2013 (AFP) - Presidents from Africa's Great Lakes region gathered Thursday in Uganda for a fresh bid to broker a deal to end fighting in resource-rich eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Meetings first took place between DR Congo leader Joseph Kabila and his rival Rwandan counterpart Paul Kagame -- who rejects accusations of backing rebel forces in Congo -- Ugandan foreign ministry spokesman Elly Kamahungye told AFP. The meeting of the 11-member International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR) -- the seventh such summit held to try to find a lasting solution -- comes amid a recent upsurge in violence. Congolese troops, backed by a special United Nations force, launched a fresh assault against the M23...
(New Vision 09/05/13)
Kampala — Foreign and defence ministers from the region are today meeting in Kampala ahead of the emergency meeting by regional heads of state to discuss the situation in Eastern DR Congo. The heads of state are set to meet at the Commonwealth Resort Munyonyo on Friday September 6, under the auspices of the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR). This follows the launch of an offensive by the UN intervention brigade against positions of the M23 rebels. Elly Kamahungye, the spokesperson of the Ugandan foreign affairs ministry said in a statement on Tuesday that Uganda, as chair of the ICGLR, felt it urgent to convene an extraordinary Summit for the member states. "This coming extraordinary summit should...
(Sabahi 09/05/13)
Tanzania and Rwanda have reached a temporary agreement to reinstate previous road toll rates after the Rwandan government significantly increased entry charges on Tanzanian vehicles, Tanzania's The Citizen reported Tuesday (September 3rd). On Sunday, Rwanda increased tolls on vehicles from Tanzania from 246,000 shillings ($152) to 809,000 shillings ($500). The price hike caused a huge backup at the border, as drivers affected by the increase protested. By Monday morning 250 lorries were stuck in a queue stretching 20 kilometres from the border. Tanzania's Deputy Minister for Transport Charles Tizeba said he was in negotiations with Rwandan Minister of Infrastructure Silas Lwakabamba, and the two leaders agreed to put the price hike on hold for a week while a new pay...
(Voice of America 09/05/13)
Heads of state and government in the Great Lakes region of Africa plan to meet in Uganda on Thursday to discuss the security crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) following renewed clashes between the national army and the M23 rebels. Uganda President Yoweri Museveni, the head of the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region, will open the meeting in Uganda’s capital, Kampala, according to Ambassador James Mugume, the permanent secretary at Uganda’s Foreign Affairs Ministry. The heads of state, Mugume says, will focus on addressing concerns of the recent DRC conflict, which threatens regional peace and security. “We would hope that the fighting would stop. We would go back to dialogue and we would have harmonization of...
(Voice of America 09/05/13)
GOMA — Leaders of Africa’s Great Lakes region are meeting in Kampala Thursday, seeking a solution to the crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo during a lull in fighting between the armed forces and the M23 rebels. But, accusations that Rwanda continues to support the rebels are complicating efforts for peace. On a cloudy morning in Goma this week, the Congolese army paraded alleged M23 defectors and children who had been forcibly recruited by the rebels in front of a group of visiting journalists. A 14-year-old boy named Joseph tells his story of being abducted by M23 from his home in Rwanda, being brought across the border to the DRC and forced to carry supplies and weapons for the...
(Reuters (Eng) 09/05/13)
NEW YORK | (Reuters Health) - Despite concerns that iron supplements may increase children's risk of malaria in regions where it is common, a new study found kids in Ghana who received nutrient powder with iron were no more likely to get the disease than their peers. According the World Health Organization (WHO), there were approximately 660,000 deaths from malaria in 2010. About 90 percent of those occurred in Africa, most in children under five years old. Some studies have suggested giving children iron might increase their risk of malaria - including one trial that was halted early due to more hospitalizations for malaria and other infections among children receiving iron. The theory is that malaria-causing parasites can take up...
(Business Daily 09/04/13)
When the East African Market Protocol came in force in May 2010, we expected to experience a dramatic increase in regional economic integration and trade. This has not visibly happened, and there is no evidence that integrated regional trade will happen any time soon. When this protocol was signed, the Arusha bureaucrats did not go out to market it to the citizens of East Africa who remain mostly ignorant of objectives and mandates of East African Community (EAC). It is evident that since 2010, individual EAC member-states have been preoccupied with pressing national priorities inevitably reducing focus on the wider EAC agenda. Kenya had a new constitution to implement. Elections were in the offing. Subsequently, devolution has pre-occupied the entire...
(Haaretz 09/03/13)
Last week’s announcement that an agreement had been reached with an African country, later identified as Uganda, to accept African migrants from Israel was not only premature but far too optimistic in terms of the number of people likely to be involved, a senior government official said Monday. Haaretz has learned that the contacts with Uganda relate to the absorption of only a few hundred migrants, so even if an agreement is successfully concluded, its influence will be limited. According to the Population, Immigration and Border Authority, some 54,000 African migrants are now living in Israel, more than 90 percent of them Eritrean and Sudanese nationals. The initial announcement about an agreement with Uganda was made last week by Interior...
(BBC News Africa 09/03/13)
Thousands of Rwandans who have been living in Tanzania for most, if not all their lives, are being forced to flee their homes. A month ago Tanzania's President Jakaya Kikwete ordered the expulsion of "illegal immigrants" and "criminals", amid heightening diplomatic tension with the Rwandan government over the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Many are now living in camps and say they were unfairly targeted because of a diplomatic row between the neighbouring countries. Catherine Byaruhanga
(BBC News Africa 09/03/13)
Several thousand "illegal immigrants" have been expelled from Tanzania to Rwanda in the past month, which some are linking to a recent row between the two governments, as the BBC's Prudent Nsengiyumva reports. With a football made from banana leaves, dozens of children are playing a match in a dusty field at the Kiyanzi camp in eastern Rwanda. Not far away, women are cooking beans and cassava in make-shift homes built with trees and iron sheets. They are among around 6,600 people who have crossed the border over the past month after Tanzania's President Jakaya Kikwete ordered the expulsion of "illegal immigrants" and "criminals", amid heightening diplomatic tension with the Rwandan government over the conflict in the Democratic Republic of...
(Voice of America 09/03/13)
JOHANNESBURG — Journalists and South Africans have flocked to former South African president Nelson Mandela’s home in Johannesburg following his release Sunday from a Pretoria hospital. Mandela spent 85 days there after being admitted on June 8 for a recurring lung infection. While many South Africans are breathing a sigh of relief, some have questioned why the world icon was released despite the fact that his condition remains critical and at times unstable. Since Sundays’ announcement that the 95-year-old former president was allowed to return home from the Medi-Clinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, social media have been flooded with congratulatory messages, and the story has made international headlines. The media that was entrenched for months outside the hospital now has...

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