Sunday 19 November 2017
(AFP (eng) 08/05/17)
Rwandans on Saturday celebrated the third term victory of President Paul Kagame who pledged to continue transforming the nation after winning re-election with a record 98 percent of the vote. There had been little doubt that the 59-year-old would return to the helm of the east African nation which he has ruled with an iron fist since the end of the 1994 genocide. "I am very pleased. I had hoped for this victory," said Yvette Uwineza, a 36-year-old computer scientist. "The continuity is reassuring," she said, crediting Kagame with developing the country and creating "a better life for Rwandans." Interim results published by the electoral commission on Saturday gave Kagame an unprecedented victor....
(AFP (eng) 08/05/17)
Rwandan President Paul Kagame sailed to a third term in office with a tally hovering around a whopping 98 percent of votes, partial results showed Saturday. There had been little doubt that the 59-year-old would return to the helm of the east African nation which he has ruled with an iron fist since the end of the 1994 genocide. With 80 percent of results counted, Kagame had secured some 5.4 million votes, far more than the 50 percent plus one required for him to win re-election. "We think that at this level ... it will be the same result, no change after having counted 100 percent (of votes)," said national elections commission chairman Kalisa Mbanda. Full provisional results will come...
(AFP (eng) 08/04/17)
Rwandan election officials tallied votes on Friday from a presidential poll expected to hand strongman Paul Kagame a massive victory and third term at the helm of the east African nation. "Kagame, Paul. Kagame, Paul," read out election officials from the vast majority of ballots at one polling station as counting began after a peaceful day of voting across "the Land of a Thousand Hills." The electoral commission's Charles Munyaneza said the process had seen "no major problems" and turnout had been good among the 6.9 million registered voters taking part in the third election since the end of the 1994 genocide. Kagame, 59, is running against two little-known candidates seen as unlikely to pose any threat to his Rwandan...
(AFP (eng) 08/04/17)
Rwandans began voting Friday in a presidential election widely expected to return strongman Paul Kagame to office for a third term at the helm of the small east African nation. Some 6.9 million Rwandans have registered to vote in the poll which pits Kagame, 59, against two little-known candidates seen as unlikely to pose any threat to his Rwandan Patriotic Front's tight control of the country. At a school in the capital, Rwandans waited patiently to cast their ballots, many of them praising Kagame for his leadership since he halted the 1994 genocide. "We don't lack anything with him (Kagame).
(The Associated Press 08/04/17)
KIGALI, Rwanda (AP) -- Rwandans voted in an election Friday that the country's longtime president was widely expected to win, while the foreign minister mocked the head of Human Rights Watch and asked if he was "off your medication again." President Paul Kagame, who won the 2010 election with 93 percent of the vote, told a rally in July that "the day of the presidential elections will just be a formality." Polls closed in the afternoon and provisional results were expected later in the day, according to Charles Munyaneza, executive secretary of the Rwanda Electoral Commission. More than 80 percent of Rwanda's 6.9 million registered voters cast their ballots, he said. Kagame was running against Frank Habineza of the Democratic...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/04/17)
Rwandan voters queued in long lines on Friday to cast their ballots in a presidential election that incumbent President Paul Kagame is tipped to win by a landslide after 17 years in power. Kagame has won international plaudits for presiding over a peaceful and rapid economic recovery in the tiny central African nation since the 1994 genocide, when an estimated 800,000 people Tutsis and moderate Hutus were killed. But he has also faced mounting censure for what critics and rights groups say are widespread human rights abuses, a muzzling of independent media and suppression of political opposition. Some political opponents were killed after they fled abroad, in cases that remain unsolved. The government denies any involvement and the cases appear...
(AfricaNews 08/04/17)
The South African government has wished Rwanda and Kenya well as both countries vote in elections that are four days apart. Rwandans vote on August 4 whiles Kenyans take their turn on August 8. South Africa’s state-owned SABC News Online reports that International Relations and Cooperation Minister, Maite Nkoana-Mashabane during a press briefing in Pretoria on Friday, called for peaceful and credible polls as Rwanda picks a president and Kenyans vote in general elections. Rwandans vote to pick a president Rwandans have already started voting as at Friday morning to elect a leader for the next seven years. It will be the last seven-year term as per a 2015 constitutional referendum that says in the 2024 polls and beyond, a...
(Bloomberg 08/04/17)
Rwandans began voting Friday in a presidential election that’s all but certain to extend Paul Kagame’s 17-year rule of the East African nation. Polling stations opened at 7 a.m. and will close at 3 p.m., with about 6.8 million people in the country of 12 million registered to vote. Electoral officials say the winner will be announced later Friday, after at least 80 percent of ballots have been counted. Kagame is competing against the Democratic Green Party of Rwanda’s Frank Habineza and Mpayimana Philippe, an independent. “He is the only candidate with a vision and he will move the country forward,” said Monique Mucyeshimana, who’d just cast her vote for Kagame in the Kicukiro district of the capital, Kigali. “No...
(AfricaNews 08/03/17)
Rwandans back home will cast their votes in presidential polls on Friday, August 4. But before they do, nationals across the world are casting their ballots. Rwanda is one of few countries that allows citizens in the diaspora to play a role in electing the president. Local media portal, the New Times Rwanda reports that polling stations have been open in African countries like Kenya, Uganda, Djibouti and South Africa. Registered voters who are overseas are also not left out as election officials are seen serving those in Belgium, the United States, Sweden and other countries. The elections are the third post the 1994 genocide and return to multi-party politics. Three candidates were passed by the National Electoral Commission (NEC)...
(Bloomberg 08/03/17)
Paul Kagame has held an iron-clad grip on power in Rwanda since taking office 17 years ago and that’s set to remain after Friday’s presidential elections, with his victory an almost foregone conclusion. The 59-year-old led a rebel army that ended the East African country’s 1994 genocide in which about 800,000 people died, and he’s been credited with turning Rwanda’s economy into one of the continent’s top performers by cutting red tape, improving internet access, roads and electricity supplies. Yet his detractors, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, say civil liberties have fallen by the wayside and the credibility of the vote has been compromised by a violent crackdown on his opponents...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/03/17)
Rwanda's Frank Habineza, the only registered opposition leader competing against President Paul Kagame in Friday's elections, pledged on Wednesday to retry political prisoners if he's elected. Appearing in the last day of campaigning, Habineza told supporters that he would take up the cause of many jailed Rwandan dissidents he said were "unfairly treated" in their sentencing. "What we have decided is that we are going to put up a special tribunal to retry those political prisoners," he told a gathering of his supporters in the capital Kigali. Rwandans vote two days from now in an election that analysts the 59-year-old Kagame will win.
(AfricaNews 08/03/17)
Rwandans will be casting ballots to elect the country’s president for the next seven years. The process has a local and global component to it. Overseas voting takes place today, August 3, whiles back home eligible voters will cast their ballots on Friday, August 4. Campaigning over the past weeks have been held in different parts of the country as the three aspirants cleared by the National Electoral Commission (NEC) canvassed for votes. The process has largely been peaceful. The incumbent, Paul Kagame, leads the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) and is up against two other contenders. Frank Habineza of the main opposition Democratic Orange party and an independent candidate, Phillippe Mpayimana. Here are some key facts about the voting process:...
(Xinhuanet 08/03/17)
Trade between China and Africa reached 85.3 billion U.S. dollars in H1, surging 19 percent year on year as the two sides strengthened cooperation in a wide range of areas, official data showed Thursday. The data reversed the negative growth trend since 2015, according to Gao Feng, spokesperson with the Ministry of Commerce. During January-June, Chinese imports from Africa, including minerals, agricultural products and fruits, amounted to 38.4 billion U.S. dollars, jumping 46 percent from the same period last year, while exports gained 3 percent to 47 billion U.S. dollars. Transport equipment has become a bright spot in China's exports to African countries, with that of ships, trains and aerospace equipment up 200 percent, 161 percent and 252 percent respectively,...
(AFP (eng) 08/02/17)
Rwandans go the polls Friday in a presidential election in which strongman Paul Kagame is widely expected to cruise to a third term in office. The 59-year-old leader faces two little-known candidates who were given only three weeks to campaign against the incumbent, who has kept a tight hold on power since his rebel army ended the 1994 genocide. Observers say Frank Habineza of the Democratic Green Party -- the only permitted critical opposition party -- and independent candidate Philippe Mpayimana face an unwinnable battle. Even Kagame has said the result is a foregone conclusion. While the nation has been colourfully covered with the red, white and blue of the ruling Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) and posters of Kagame, there...
(AFP (eng) 08/02/17)
Here are key dates since President Paul Kagame's ruling Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) took control of Rwanda in 1994. - 1994: Genocide and takeover in Kigali - On July 4, 1994, the armed wing of the RPF -- which launched a civil war four years earlier from Uganda where its founding Tutsi members were exiled -- captures Kigali. The seizure of the capital halts 100 days of genocide in which extremist Hutus killed 800,000 people, primarily minority Tutsis. A million Hutus, including those held responsible for the worst massacres, flee across the western border to Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Pasteur Bizimungu, a Hutu allied with the RPF, is named president, and RPF leader Paul Kagame becomes...
(AfricaNews 08/02/17)
Three young technology entrepreneurs in Rwanda have decided to take on the job of providing free app development skills and training to the youth in the country. The trio – Ildephonse Mungwarakarama, Theogene Niyonsenga and Jerome Habimana – started a company in 2014 called House of Technology. Their aim is to bring technology to the youth all over the country so as to improve academic outcomes and prepare the future workforce. They launched a programme last week called Code for Good. This programme is open to the public who want to be trained in app development, help to train others, or offer support for future projects. On their website – code.rw – the trio said they are not only focusing...
(Voice of America 08/02/17)
Three days before the presidential election in Rwanda, the country's electoral commission says it is not bothered by people who suggest the outcome is a fait accompli. "It is not a foregone conclusion and we are not wasting money," said the commission's executive secretary, Charles Munyaneza, in an exclusive interview with VOA's Central Africa service. "We are not bothered as a commission and I also think Rwandans are also not bothered," he said. "... We are running elections, we are spending money because we want to build a system we have started as Rwandans." At campaign stops, President Paul Kagame's supporters have been heard saying the election is over and they are simply waiting to show their approval on Election...
(Bloomberg 08/02/17)
Julien Ochala can’t live without his morning cup of Joe. But not just any coffee will do. For the past five years, the 37-year-old physiology lecturer at King’s College London has visited the same store every week to grab a pack of his beloved Kenyan brew. And he’s not put off by the cost: at 37 pounds a kilogram ($22 a pound), it’s more than double a similar supermarket product. "I take Kenyan coffee every morning," said Ochala, who buys his beans from Monmouth Coffee Company in Borough Market. "I love it because of the relatively higher acidity level. It keeps me active in the afternoons." Customers willing to pay a premium for African brews, known for their floral, fruity...
(AFP (eng) 08/01/17)
Paul Kagame is revered for stopping Rwanda's genocide and engineering what admirers call an economic miracle, but his critics see a despot who crushes all opposition and rules through fear. The 59-year-old former guerrilla fighter is seeking a third term in office in August 4 polls after voters massively approved a constitutional amendment allowing him to run again and potentially stay in office for another two decades. Kagame frames his run as a duty to his country, however the move angered international allies whose patience has worn thin with a man once held up as a shining example of successful post-colonial leadership in Africa. Yet the president of the tiny central African nation has become one of Africa's most powerful...
(AFP (eng) 08/01/17)
Frank Habineza is an environmentalist running to become Rwanda's president for the first time after an eight-year struggle to register his party and obtain a spot on the ballot paper. The 40-year-old leader of the Democratic Green Party has faced death threats and seen supporters beaten up, imprisoned and forced into exile during his bid to enter Rwanda's tightly controlled political space. "It has been a very difficult journey, and also a very dangerous journey," he told AFP at an interview in his stark office in the capital Kigali, where a bodyguard keeps watch on the balcony. Born to a Hutu father and a Tutsi mother in exile in Uganda, he returned to Rwanda to study public administration. He also...

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