| Africatime
Wednesday 29 March 2017
(AFP (eng) 11/02/16)
Stopping the killing of elephants for their tusks could add some $25 million (23 million euros) to Africa's annual tourism income, more than offsetting the anti-poaching spend, a study said Tuesday. While the figure pales in comparison to the estimated value of the black market ivory trade in China, it represents about a fifth of tourist income for game parks in 14 countries, where half of Africa's elephants are located, the study said. "We find that the lost economic benefits that elephants could deliver to African countries via tourism are substantial, and that these benefits exceed the costs necessary to halt elephant declines in east, southern and west Africa," the authors wrote in the journal Nature Communications. The conservation of...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/31/16)
About 220 African migrants forced their way through a barbed wire fence into Spain's North African enclave of Ceuta on Monday, clashing with Spanish police who tried to prevent them from crossing the border with Morocco. Thirty-two migrants were treated in hospital for minor injuries after pushing their way through two gates just before 2 a.m. ET, while three Spanish policemen also needed medical attention, the government said. Several migrants collapsed from exhaustion after crossing into Spanish territory, Reuters photographs showed. Their legal status in Spain has yet to be determined, and police were searching for some who fled into hills inside the territory, it said. Spain's two enclaves in Morocco, Ceuta and Melilla, have been favored entry points into...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/29/16)
By Michelle Nichols | UNITED NATIONS United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon expressed regret on Friday that South Africa, Burundi and Gambia want to leave the International Criminal Court and said it could "send a wrong message on these countries' commitment to justice." The International Criminal Court, which opened in July 2002 and has 124 member states, is the first legal body with permanent international jurisdiction to prosecute genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. South Africa and Burundi have officially notified the United Nations of their intent to withdraw from the Rome Statute, the 1998 treaty establishing The Hague-based court, which will take effect in October 2017. Gambia said this week that it also plans to withdraw from the court,...
(APA 10/28/16)
Senegalese Prime Minister, Mahammad Abdallah Boun Dionne has dismissed any idea of ​​postponement of parliamentary elections, assuring that they will be held in 2017 and on the agreed date. “The parliamentary elections will be held on the scheduled date in 2017. I want to reassure you that the President has stated that, the electoral timetable will be respected. The parliamentary elections will be held right on time”, said PM Dionne who was answering, on Thursday, MPs' questions on current issues. The mandate of the 12th Senegalese legislature elected in 2012 expires in 2017. But the idea of ​​holding the legislative and the 2019 presidential elections together which was being mooted, especially by some members
(Cnbc Africa 10/28/16)
The World Bank recently released the Doing Business 2016/17 report. The survey tracks a set of regulatory indicators related to business start-up, operation, trade, payment of taxes and closure, by measuring the time and cost associated with various government requirements. However, the index does not track variables such as macroeconomic policy, currency volatility (an extremely important factor in many emerging market countries) or crime rates, which are also important in investment decisions. According to the most recent rankings, New Zealand has the most accommodative business environment globally, having overtaken Singapore since the previous report. From an African perspective, Mauritius has maintained its title as the most accommodative business environment on the continent followed by Rwanda, Morocco, Botswana and South Africa...
(AFP (eng) 10/27/16)
Complex diverse political agendas are driving African nations to quit the International Criminal Court, with leaders seeking to cloak the move by reigniting age-old anger at the West, analysts say. Gambia's announcement that it would be the third country to withdraw from the court is all the more frustrating as it comes at a time when the tribunal is beginning to probe some of the world's most intractable conflicts, in places such as the Palestinian territories and Afghanistan, experts say. Set up in 2002, the ICC's mission is to try the world's most heinous crimes which national governments are either unable or unwilling to prosecute. And most of the ICC prosecutions, such as in the Democratic Republic of the Congo,...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/26/16)
African states unhappy with the International Criminal Court(ICC) should work to reform it from within rather than pulling out, Botswanan foreign minister Pelomoni Venson-Moitoi, a candidate to become the next African Union (AU) chief, said. With the AU increasingly divided over the ICC, South Africa announced last week that it planned to quit, but Venson-Moitoi said she believed an African war crimes court could be beefed up to work alongside its Hague-based counterpart. Although South Africa argued that the ICC's Rome Statutes were at odds with its laws granting leaders diplomatic immunity, other African countries see the tribunal purely as an instrument of colonial justice that unfairly targets the continent. "I don't see why we should be pulling out. The...
(AFP (eng) 10/25/16)
A French court has ordered the release from police custody of a former legal adviser to disgraced former world athletics head Lamine Diack, his lawyers said on Monday. Habib Cisse was placed behind bars earlier this month as part of a French investigation into corruption linked to state-sponsored doping of Russian athletes. Cisse, 41, was put under investigation in November 2015 for corruption along with Diack and Gabriel Dolle, former anti-doping doctor for the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). "His provisional detention was completely unjustified," his lawyers Louis-Marie de Roux and Cedric Labrousse told AFP after successfully appealing his incarceration, insisting he was not a flight risk. Diack headed the IAAF from 1999 to 2015 but found himself at...
(AFP (eng) 10/25/16)
The International Criminal Court on Monday urged member states to seek a consensus with critical African nations, while stressing that South Africa and Burundi's announced departures would not take place for at least year. "Today more than ever, there is a huge need for universal justice," said Sidiki Kaba, president of the assembly of state parties to the ICC founding treaty, evoking "the tragedies which are happening in front of our eyes". Kaba, also Senegal's justice minister, said it was necessary "to engage in dialogue with the nations which want to leave the ICC. For that we must listen to their concerns, their recriminations and their criticism". South Africa dealt a heavy blow to the troubled international court on Friday...
(This Day Live 10/24/16)
The London Stock Exchange (LSE) has provided $26.1 billion for African companies in the last 10 years, the Chief Executive Officer of the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE), Mr. Oscar Onyema has said. Onyema disclosed this while speaking at the third “London & Lagos Capital Markets in Partnership’ conference held at the LSE at the weekend. According to him, eight Nigerian companies were among those that benefitted from the international capital raising on the LSE, noting that more African companies (112) are listed in London than any other international exchange. The 112 companies, he said, have a combined market capitalisation in excess of $200 billion, the largest concentration of African quoted companies outside of Johannesburg. Out of these companies, eight companies...
(AFP (eng) 10/21/16)
Demand for homegrown contemporary music is sweeping Africa and driving a creative boom in an industry otherwise battered by falling CD sales and rampant piracy. A recent study of the entertainment sector by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) accountants showed rapid earnings growth in many African countries, fuelled largely by live performances by local artists. "Consumers are increasingly wanting local content," Vicki Myburgh, a PwC director who conducted the study released last month, told AFP. "The Nigerian music market... will (soon) grow at nearly 13 percent annually, which is a fantastic rate." This weekend, African talent will be celebrated in Johannesburg at the annual MTV Africa awards set up in 2008 to recognise those "who have made the most impact on African music...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/20/16)
Encouraged by their success in halting a mass influx of refugees by closing Greek borders and cutting a controversial deal with Turkey, EU leaders are getting tough on African migrants too. A Brussels summit on Thursday will endorse pilot projects to pressure African governments via aid budgets to slow an exodus of people north across the Sahara and Mediterranean. It also wants swift results from an EU campaign to deport large numbers who reach Italy. "By the end of the year, we need to see results," one senior EU diplomat said on Wednesday. Arrivals in Italy so far this year are nearly six percent higher than the same period of 2015. Italy received 154,000 migrants last year and this year's...
(AFP (eng) 10/19/16)
Senegalese prosecutors requested a six-month sentence Wednesday for an imam accused of insulting the country's most powerful Muslim brotherhood, in a case that has underlined the group's outsized influence. The Mourides are one of four important Sufi brotherhoods followed by Senegal's Muslims, who overwhelmingly practise a moderate version of Islam while following the teachings of local spiritual guides. The case relates to a video posted in September by imam Cheikh Mbacke Sakho in which he accused Mouride elders of taking money from Muslims to further their own business interests, and of "swindling" followers.
(Bloomberg 10/19/16)
Fifteen years ago, a South African media company invested $34 million in an obscure Chinese Internet developer. Today that stake is worth $88 billion. All Naspers Ltd., now Africa’s most valuable company, has to do is figure out how to make money from its other properties: The whole company is worth only $72 billion, less than its stake in Shenzhen-based Tencent Holdings Ltd. Investors aren’t impressed with Naspers’s operations in pay-TV, newspapers and e-commerce in such countries as South Africa, Russia and India. To win them over, Chief Executive Officer Bob Van Dijk has launched an aggressive push to sell some assets, invest in others and expand operations such as classified advertising into new markets. If it pays off, comparisons...
(AFP (eng) 10/18/16)
A Senegalese court has doubled the sentence of a geography teacher turned radical preacher convicted for condoning terrorism, its chief justice told AFP Tuesday, as the west African country tightens restrictions on Islamists. In the first interview with international media on the highly sensitive case, President of the Court of Appeal Demba Kandji confirmed imam Ibrahima Seye had been "sentenced to 30 months in prison, 24 without parole," on October 11. Prosecutors had appealed for a harsher punishment after Seye, 38, was given a year for espousing "proven sympathies for (extremist groups) Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) and Islamic State" while delivering sermons in southern Senegal.
(AFP (eng) 10/18/16)
Habib Cisse, the former legal advisor to disgraced former world athletics head Lamine Diack, has been placed in custody as part of the French investigation into corruption linked to state-sponsored doping of Russian athletes, sources said Tuesday. Cisse, 41, was put under investigation in November 2015 for corruption along with Diack and Gabriel Dolle, former anti-doping doctor for the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). Cisse's lawyers, Louis-Marie de Roux and Cedric Labrousse, told AFP the decision was "unbelievable and unjustified" and immediately appealed it. Eliane Houlette, head of France's financial prosecution department, said in January that all three men had admitted covering up positive Russian
(AFP (eng) 10/18/16)
Senegal paid tribute Tuesday to retiring wrestling champion Yakhya "Yekini" Diop, celebrating a quarter-century of mesmerising bouts that saw his sport shift from village amateurs to big-money stars grappling in sold-out stadiums. Yekini's exceptionally long career and unbeaten record from 1997 to 2012 made him the face of Senegal's national sport. The much-loved 42-year-old star was finally beaten by rival Lac de Guiers 2 on July 24 after a long absence from competition. "Yekini throws in the loincloth" proclaimed the front page of several Senegalese newspapers on Tuesday, while a more sober take from l'Obs daily read: "The curtain falls on Yekini". The most popular form of wrestling in Senegal unusually allows punches to an opponent's head, and is known...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/18/16)
Dubai - Emirates airline could reduce the frequency of its flights to African cities or cut routes completely if current economic and financial challenges on the continent continue, President Tim Clark told reporters. Foreign airlines flying to Nigeria have started to refuel abroad because jet fuel supplies there have become more expensive and scarce as the country battles a hard currency shortage. Emirates has started a detour to Accra, Ghana to refuel its daily Abuja-bound flight, a spokesperson said last month; the airline had already cut its twice-daily flights to Lagos and Abuja to just one. “In certain African countries, the currencies have really gone down, so we're reflecting on a number of these to look at where it's just...
(Voice of America 10/17/16)
Telecom workers in Burkina Faso were on strike again this month, leading to phone and internet interruptions. The country has only one internet service provider, Onatel, but the days of the telecom monopoly in Africa may ending. The Burkina Faso telecommunications authority fined Onatel 5 billion CFA francs ($8.5 million U.S.) in response to the strike, which cut internet access across the country for more than a week. Arouna Ouédraogo, an information technology specialist, said people without access to the internet become desperate. He said he businesspeople rushing to his internet cafe with contracts to sign and documents to send, but he couldn't help them. "People outside this country just cannot imagine that there is no internet" for such an...
(AFP (eng) 10/15/16)
Stemming the astronomical losses caused by crime in the oceans surrounding Africa is the focus of a major continental summit on Saturday in the Togolese capital, Lome. "Over recent decades, the accumulated revenue losses resulting directly from illegal activities in the African maritime sector add up to hundreds of billions of US dollars, without counting the loss of human lives," the African Union (AU) said in an online statement about its Protect Our Oceans meeting. Up to 30 African heads of state and government are expected to attend the gathering, whose full title is the AU Extraordinary Summit on Maritime Security and Safety and Development in Africa. The long-term aim, according to the AU, is to "make maritime space the...

Pages