Tuesday 19 September 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 08/16/17)
Rescue workers have recovered nearly 400 bodies from a mudslide in the outskirts of Sierra Leone's capital Freetown, the chief coroner said on Tuesday, as morgues struggled to find space for all the dead. Dozens of houses were buried when a mountainside collapsed in the town of Regent on Monday morning - one of the deadliest natural disasters in Africa in recent years. President Ernest Bai Koroma urged residents of Regent and other flooded areas around Freetown to evacuate immediately so that military personnel and other rescue workers could continue to search for survivors who might be buried underneath debris. "As the search continues, we have collected nearly 400 bodies - but we anticipate more than 500," chief coroner Seneh...
(Xinhuanet 08/16/17)
China is ready to provide assistance to mudslide-hit areas of Sierra Leone, a Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson said Tuesday. More than 300 people were killed in a mudslide and flooding in the capital Freetown Monday, according to Sierra Leone's national broadcaster. The death toll is expected to rise and more than 2,000 people have been left homeless. China expressed its sympathy to those affected by the disaster, spokesperson Hua Chunying told a press conference. Hua said the Chinese Embassy in Sierra Leone has launched emergency procedures and is closely monitoring the situation. No casualties to Chinese nationals have been reported, Hua said.
(Xinhuanet 08/16/17)
Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena on Wednesday conveyed his condolences to victims of floods in Sierra Leone. Sirisena said "as a country which suffered from a similar devastation recently, I express my deepest sympathy to the victims of the flood in Sierra Leone." Nearly 400 people are confirmed dead and at least 600 missing following a devastating mudslide and floods in Sierra Leone's capital, Freetown. The Western African country has pleaded for "urgent support," saying entire communities had been wiped out.
(AFP (eng) 08/15/17)
President Ernest Bai Koroma of Sierra Leone said Tuesday that his country needed "urgent support now" for thousands of people affected by massive flooding and mudslides in the capital of one of the world's poorest nations. Addressing the media in the Regent hilltop community of Freetown, one of the areas hit hardest by a mudslide that has destroyed homes, Koroma fought back tears as he said the devastation "was overwhelming us". "Entire communities have been wiped out," Koroma said at the disaster site, where heavy rains streaming down the hillside engulfed homes three or four stories high on Monday...
(AFP (eng) 08/14/17)
The death toll from massive flooding in the Sierra Leone capital of Freetown climbed to 312 on Monday afternoon, the local Red Cross told AFP. Red Cross spokesman Patrick Massaquoi told AFP the toll could rise further as his team continued to survey disaster areas in Freetown, where heavy rains have caused homes to disappear under water and triggered a mudslide.
(AFP (eng) 08/14/17)
At least 180 people were killed and more than 2,000 left homeless when a mudslide and heavy flooding hit Sierra Leone's capital, Freetown, on Monday, leaving hospitals struggling to cope. An AFP journalist at the scene saw bodies being carried away and houses submerged in two areas of the city, where roads were turned into churning rivers of mud and corpses washed up on the streets. Mohamed Sinneh, a morgue technician at Freetown's Connaught Hospital, said "at least" 180 bodies had been received so far, many of them children, leaving no space to lay the dead because of the "overwhelming" number of corpses at the facility. More bodies were taken to private morgues, Sinneh said. Disaster management official Candy Rogers...
(Reuters (Eng) 08/14/17)
DAKAR (Reuters) - At least 179 bodies have been brought to the central morgue in Sierra Leone's capital, Freetown, after a mudslide in the outskirts of the city on Monday morning, the Red Cross said. The death toll is expected to rise as more bodies are recovered, Red Cross spokesman Abu Bakarr Tarawallie said by telephone.
(The Guardian 08/14/17)
More than 2,000 estimated homeless as mudslide on outskirts of capital Freetown submerges houses and turns streets into churning rivers. Hundreds of people are thought to have been killed in a mudslide on the outskirts of Sierra Leone’s capital, Freetown. A hillside in Regent, a mountainous town 15 miles east of Freetown, collapsed in the early hours of Monday morning after heavy rains, leaving hundreds of people trapped. Morgues in the capital have been overwhelmed with bodies, while relatives have been left to dig through the mud in search of their loved ones’ remains. Death tolls are unconfirmed, though the International Federation of Red Cross reports that 312 have been killed, and more than 1,000 affected. Disaster officials in Sierra...
(Xinhuanet 08/14/17)
Over 200 corpses have been taken to the hospital after a heavy downpour caused mudslides in the mountain town of Regent in the western and other parts of Freetown, capital of Sierra Leone, Head of the Connaught Hospital Motuary,Sinneh Kamara, has disclosed here Monday. The military and the police are currently engaged in a rescue mission and the number of fatalities might increase because ambulances are currently taking dead bodies to the mortuary. Relatives are at the mortuary, seeking to identify family members but they have been prevented by the military because the situation is very much chaotic at the moment.
(Reuters (Eng) 08/14/17)
Hundreds of people are feared buried in a mudslide on Monday in the outskirts of Sierra Leone's capital, witnesses said. The mudslide happened in the early morning in the mountain town of Regent, where dozens of houses were submerged after a night of heavy rain. A death toll was not immediately available.
(Bloomberg 08/14/17)
The U.S. will probably maintain its current levels of aid to Africa despite President Donald Trump’s proposals to slash funding, according to Bill Gates, the world’s richest man. Trump said in May his government would no longer allocate funding for family planning, a move that has the potential to undermine aid programs in the poorest countries in the world. However, with Congress in control of the budget, it’s unlikely that all cuts proposed by the Trump administration will go ahead next year, Gates said in an interview in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s commercial capital. “It’s quite clear that they won’t make those drastic cuts,” Gates said. “I’m hopeful they won’t make any cuts at all, but that’s still subject to...
(AFP (eng) 08/10/17)
The skull of an infant ape buried by a volcano 13 million years ago has preserved intriguing clues about the ancestor humans shared with apes -- including a likely African origin, scientists said Wednesday. A previously-unknown creature that shared an extended family with the human forefather, had a flat face like that of our far-flung cousin the gibbon, but did not move like one, its discoverers wrote in the journal Nature. They named it Nyanzapithecus alesi after "ales" -- the word for "ancestor" in the Turkana language of Kenya, where the lemon-sized skull was unearthed. The sole specimen is that of an infant that would have grown to weigh about 11 kilogrammes (24 pounds) in adulthood. It had a brain...
(Xinhuanet 08/09/17)
The United States Trade Representative (USTR) on Wednesday affirmed the commitment of his country to Africa and saw "great potential to grow and deepen trade relationship." Robert E. Lighthizer expressed this in opening speech of the ministerial plenary as part of the 16th Forum of the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), on Wednesday here in Togolese capital Lome. "The United States is committed to Africa. We see great potential to grow and deepen our trade relationship, with the goal of establishing a true partnership for the future", Lighthizer said. "By lowering barriers and tackling other constraints that impede trade and investment, we are poised to see U.S.-Africa trade flourish", he said, underscoring that "much more work needs to be...
(APA 08/08/17)
The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the implications for human rights of environmentally-sound management and disposal of hazardous substances and wastes is due in Sierra Leone next week. The government has announced that Baskut Tuncak is to embark on a week-long visit to enable him gain first-hand understanding of human rights and their connection with the issue of the handling and disposal of toxic and other hazardous substances. Mr Tuncak is scheduled to arrive in Freetown on Monday 14 August and depart Friday 25 August, a statement from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation said.
(Reuters (Eng) 08/08/17)
Tuesday's action at the World Athletics Championships sees two of the most intriguing races of the program as South Africa's Wayde van Niekerk bids for the first half of his 400/200 meters double and Nigel Amos goes for gold in the men's 800m. World record holder and defending champion Van Niekerk should be unbeatable in the 400m but faces a stiff challenge, not least from Botswanan duo Isaac Makwala and Thebe Baboloki. Another Botswanan, Amos, will also have to be at his best in the 800m, where a clutch of athletes are suddenly dreaming of glory in the absence of Kenya's injured champion David Rudisha. Kenya is expected to continue its dominance of the men's 3,000m steeplechase - though American...
(Xinhuanet 08/03/17)
Trade between China and Africa reached 85.3 billion U.S. dollars in H1, surging 19 percent year on year as the two sides strengthened cooperation in a wide range of areas, official data showed Thursday. The data reversed the negative growth trend since 2015, according to Gao Feng, spokesperson with the Ministry of Commerce. During January-June, Chinese imports from Africa, including minerals, agricultural products and fruits, amounted to 38.4 billion U.S. dollars, jumping 46 percent from the same period last year, while exports gained 3 percent to 47 billion U.S. dollars. Transport equipment has become a bright spot in China's exports to African countries, with that of ships, trains and aerospace equipment up 200 percent, 161 percent and 252 percent respectively,...
(Bloomberg 08/02/17)
Julien Ochala can’t live without his morning cup of Joe. But not just any coffee will do. For the past five years, the 37-year-old physiology lecturer at King’s College London has visited the same store every week to grab a pack of his beloved Kenyan brew. And he’s not put off by the cost: at 37 pounds a kilogram ($22 a pound), it’s more than double a similar supermarket product. "I take Kenyan coffee every morning," said Ochala, who buys his beans from Monmouth Coffee Company in Borough Market. "I love it because of the relatively higher acidity level. It keeps me active in the afternoons." Customers willing to pay a premium for African brews, known for their floral, fruity...
(Bloomberg 08/01/17)
British American Tobacco Plc faces a formal probe by the U.K.’s Serious Fraud Office following reports that the maker of Dunhill cigarettes bribed African government officials to influence tobacco legislation. BAT said Tuesday it is running its own investigations, via external legal advisers, into allegations of misconduct and is cooperating with the U.K. prosecutor. A BBC report two years ago said BAT had a lobbyist arrange bribes totaling $26,000 for three public officials in Rwanda, Burundi and the Comoros Islands in 2015. The British broadcaster said the bribery was revealed by a former employee, Paul Hopkins. At the time, BAT said “we do not tolerate corruption in our business, no matter where it takes place.” The SFO investigation adds to...
(AFP (eng) 07/31/17)
Street jogging with your chums is a sport enjoyed by millions around the world -- but not by police in Sierra Leone, who have just outlawed the practice. To the dismay of fun-runners, police in the west African state have banned group jogging in the street on the grounds that it encourages disruptive behaviour. "Police headquarters has observed with dismay that people are in the habit of jogging in large numbers along the streets with a hint of menace, raining insults, obstructing traffic, pounding on vehicles, playing loud music, and snatching property from other members of the public," the police announced. Their letter, dated July 27, said an "immediate ban on such activities" was being enforced "in line with the...
(The Guardian 07/28/17)
Abortion is illegal in Sierra Leone, with one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy in the world. Attitudes need to change to save the lives of young girls. I recently saw a girl in clinic with terrible complications following a caesarean section. The operation had been botched and she had an infection around her uterus. She was in terrible pain and critically unwell. This was in the children’s clinic; the girl was 14 years old. This scenario is all too common. She is just one of the thousands of adolescent girls estimated to have become pregnant this year in Sierra Leone. In 2013 the country had the 7th highest teenage pregnancy rate in the world, 38% of women aged...

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