Saturday 19 August 2017
(Sudan Tribune 06/11/13)
(KHARTOUM) – Sudan’s National Assembly has expressed support to president Omer Hassan al-Bashir’s decision to halt oil flow from South Sudan with only one MP dissenting. On Saturday Bashir ordered the closure of all pipelines carrying oil from South Sudan. He told a public rally in the capital Khartoum that the move was in response to South Sudan’s funding of rebels fighting his government. Bashir had warned last month that he would block the oil flow if Juba continues providing assistance to insurgents fighting in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states or in the Darfur region. Juba routinely denies the allegations. The head of the parliamentary subcommittee for economic affairs Omar Ali Al-Amin, said that the president’s decision was "absolutely...
(Sudan Tribune 06/11/13)
(KHARTOUM) – The spokesman of the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) Colonel Al-Sawarmi Khalid Saad dismissed accusations made by South Sudan of incursions into its territory calling it "baseless". The army spokesman speaking to state media stressed that Khartoum is fully committed to the international borders in accordance with the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA). Col. Sawarmi also reiterated Khartoum’s assertions of an "occupation" by Juba of six Sudanese border areas. On Sunday, South Sudan army spokesman Philip Aguer claimed that SAF troops invaded Kuek, an area located about 10km North West of Renk county in Upper Nile state forcing SPLA to retreat. “The Sudan Armed Forces violated the security arrangement and crossed into Kuek. They have remained there. They are...
(BBC News Africa 06/11/13)
Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir has ordered the stoppage of oil transfers through its territory from South Sudan from Sunday, state media report. State radio gave no further details in a text alert that it sent to subscribers. Oil only started flowing again in April after the two sides struck a deal. President Bashir said in May that Sudan would stop the flow of oil if South Sudan continued to support rebels operating on Sudanese soil. The Sudanese army is fighting a rebel insurgency in at least three regions. Despite the South's independence in 2011, tensions over oil and land disputes have continued. An umbrella rebel group called the Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) has launched attacks on several towns, briefly occupying...
(Voice of America 06/11/13)
JUBA — South Sudan continues to pump oil to Sudan despite a threat from its neighbor to stop cross-border flows in a row over alleged support for rebels, its oil minister said on Monday. The landlocked African country, which has to use Sudan's export facilities, has piped around 7 million barrels of crude to its neighbor since resuming production in April, Stephen Dhieu Dau told reporters. "This is increasing every day," he said in the capital Juba. "This is not the final figure because producing is still on, we have not received any official communication from the government of Sudan so we are still producing." He gave no production figure but officials said last month the country was pumping around...
(The Africa Report 06/10/13)
Local governments in South Sudan have begun enforcing forceful disarmament to eliminate cattle rustling and clashes between communities. Officials in the East African country have long decried armed cattle rustling, which has often caused bloody tribal clashes among communities. Awash with arms, after over two decades of civil war, South Sudan still suffers from communal rivalry. "The initiative is aimed at restoring peace and security in the state that has been affected by cattle raids. At any time we will stage a forceful disarmament, we will deploy a large number of security force at county and village levels to carry out the exercise," said Unity State Security Advisor, Manyiew Dak. With a long tradition in livestock farming, South Sudan has...
( 06/10/13)
Sudan's opposition alliance announced on Saturday a 100-day plan for the peaceful overthrow of President Omar al-Bashir, who has been in power for more than two decades. "I expect the regime will fall before the 100 days finish," said Farouk Abu Issa, who represents more than 20 opposition parties. He said the first month of the plan includes public forums, including at universities. They would also ask the state security service for permission to hold a mass rally. "If we don't get it, then there is another step we can take but we will not announce it now," he told a press conference. Over the past year, the opposition alliance has pledged to mobilise its members for peaceful protests to...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/10/13)
KHARTOUM (Reuters) - Sudan's president ordered a stoppage of all South Sudan's oil exports from Sunday, accusing his neighbour of backing rebels on his territory, and bringing the foes back to the brink of confrontation after months of relative peace. President Omar Hassan al-Bashir urged youths to join the army and prepare for "holy war". He did not name the enemy but the head of Sudan's paramilitary forces said his men were ready to confront Khartoum's long-time opponent South Sudan. The order to shut pipelines carrying oil from landlocked South Sudan through Sudan to a port on the Red Sea - the South's only route to market - came just three months after the countries ended a bitter dispute over...
(Sudan Tribune 06/10/13)
June 9, 2013 (KHARTOUM) – The director of Sudan’s National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) Mohamed Atta al-Moula Abbas denied reports that Sudanese officers made an attempt on the life of a rebel leader. According to the reports, Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) chairman Malik Agar survived an assassination attempt in Uganda’s capital killing one of his bodyguards and several of the assailants.SRF has not commented on these reports. In his response to a question on the alleged incident, Abbas denied Agar presence in Uganda and said that he has been in Albonj in South Sudan near the borders of the Blue Nile state for some time. The NISS director claimed that the SRF held a meeting recently but that Agar...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/10/13)
KHARTOUM — Sudan may reverse its decision to close cross-border oil flows from South Sudan if its neighbor stops its alleged support for rebels, Sudan's Information Minister said on Sunday. "We plan to close the oil pipelines within 60 days... but we might reverse the decision," Ahmed Belal Osman told reporters, without elaborating. "The door is open for rational thinking... but we won't allow the support of rebels." Sudan's President Omar Hassan al-Bashir said on Saturday it would halt the south's oil exports through northern facilities because of its alleged backing of rebels operating on Sudanese soil. South Sudan denies it offers any such support. The order to shut pipelines from landlocked South Sudan through Sudan to a port on...
(Voice of America 06/10/13)
South Sudan’s Minister of Information Barnaba Marial Benjamin has accused Sudan of using “blackmail” and “hostage taking” to talk about unilaterally abrogating internationally-sponsored agreements between the two countries. He was reacting to reports that Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has ordered the closure of all pipelines carrying oil from South Sudan beginning Sunday (June 9). Bashir told a public rally in the capital, Khartoum, Saturday that the move was in response to South Sudan's support of rebels fighting the Khartoum regime in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile. Benjamin denies South Sudan is supporting SPLM-N rebels. Instead, he said it is Khartoum which has been supporting South Sudan militias like the rebel group headed by David Yau Yau. Benjamin said, while South...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/10/13)
KHARTOUM/JUBA (Reuters) - Sudan edged back from a day-old order to block all oil exports from South Sudan on Sunday, saying it could reverse its decision if its neighbor stopped backing rebels, and bringing the countries back from the brink of confrontation. The standoff, even if it is eventually resolved, is a stark reminder of the unpredictability of this small but, for China and other Asian buyers and producers, still significant corner of the crude industry. Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir on Saturday accused South Sudan of arming insurgents in his territory and ordered the closure of pipelines carrying oil from the landlocked South through his country to Port Sudan on the Red Sea - currently the South's only export...
(AFP (eng) 06/10/13)
Sudan on Sunday prepared to stop the oil flow from South Sudan on the orders of President Omar al-Bashir but an expert said the process could take weeks. Bashir said petroleum companies working in South Sudan will be informed about "shutting down the pipeline" from Sunday, the official SUNA news agency reported. The order came after Sudan's leader warned the South over backing rebels, who analysts say humiliated the authorities with recent attacks. South Sudan's government in Juba denies supporting insurgents in the north. "I think if you do it properly it would take 45 days," to stop the oil without causing damage, said the independent expert who asked not to be further identified. "It's not like opening and closing...
(Voice of America 06/10/13)
Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir has ordered the closure of all pipelines carrying oil from South Sudan. Bashir told public rally in the capital Khartoum on Saturday that the move was in response to South Sudan's funding of rebels fighting his regime. He ordered the stoppages to begin Sunday. Bashir had warned last month that he would block the oil if the South Sudan's government provides assistance to rebels fighting in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states, or in the Darfur region. Juba has denied supporting rebels. Land locked South Sudan must export its oil to international markets through pipelines owned by Sudan that run through its territory.
(Voice of America 06/10/13)
Decades of drought in central Africa may have had a surprising cause, according to new research that challenges the notion that the severe dry weather was triggered mainly by bad agricultural practices and overgrazing. The research, done at the University of Washington, shows that the drought was at least partially caused by pollution in the Northern Hemisphere. The researchers said that sulfate-laden aerosols coming from coal-burning factories from the 1960s through the 1980s actually slowed warming in the Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern Hemisphere. This shifted tropical rain bands south, away from the Sahel region, and led ultimately to the near drying up of Lake Chad, which is used to water crops in surrounding areas. Africa's Sahel regionAfrica's Sahel...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/09/13)
(Reuters) - South Africans prayed for Nelson Mandela's recovery on Sunday as the 94-year-old former president spent a second day in hospital with a recurring lung infection. Mandela, who became a global symbol of triumph over adversity and South Africa's first black leader in 1994 after the defeat of apartheid, was hospitalized early on Saturday after his already frail health worsened. It is his fourth hospital stay since December and the government said on Saturday his condition was "serious". During previous hospital visits it had highlighted his "good spirits". His health is a cause for concern to the millions of South Africans who revere Mandela for his decades of struggle against white-minority rule and steering the continent's biggest economy to...
(AFP (eng) 06/08/13)
Sudanese police on Friday fired tear gas after about 200 protesters gathered near a mosque which became a focus of Arab Spring-style protests one year ago, witnesses said. "The people want the fall of the regime," protesters shouted, according to the witnesses who said demonstrators also denounced high food prices. Witnesses said the protest occurred after prayers at the mosque linked to an opposition party, Umma, in Khartoum's twin city of Omdurman. Demonstrators made the same calls in June and July last year when when scattered anti-regime protests sparked by inflation spread around the country. They later petered out following a security clampdown. A separate spurt of anti-government rallies occurred in December when hundreds marched in Khartoum's streets after the...
(BBC News Africa 06/08/13)
Nelson Mandela has been admitted to hospital with a lung infection. The former South African president is in a "serious but stable condition", a spokesman for the current President, Jacob Zuma, says. Mr Mandela, 94, has been ill for some days but deteriorated overnight and was transferred to a hospital in Pretoria. Mr Mandela led the fight against apartheid, became South Africa's first black president, and is widely regarded as father of the nation. He has recently suffered a series of health problems and this is his fifth visit to hospital in two years. In April he was released from hospital after a 10-day stay caused by pneumonia. His illness was described on Saturday as a recurrence of a lung...
(AL Jazeera 06/07/13)
"The Regime Wants" is a new play poking fun at dictators in the fictional state of Majamrata with obvious implications. The dictator aims to change the people, so the people don't change his regime [Isma'il Kushkush/Al Jazeera]. Khartoum, Sudan - Not far from the junction of the White and Blue Niles in Khartoum, a large billboard outside the Chinese-built Friendship Hall grabs the attention of passers-by. It is an advertisement for a comedic play: “The Regime Wants.” No, it is not a typo. It is the title of a play that is meant to take a satiric jab at the Arab Spring’s popular chant. In 2011, in Cairo’s Tahrir Square during the height of The Egyptian Revolution, protesters came up...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/07/13)
Khartoum - More than 60 000 people have fled a town in Sudan's main oil region since it was attacked by insurgents in April, the United Nations said in a report on Thursday. Rebels said later they had shot down a second military helicopter within one week. Government forces retook the town of Abu Kershola two weeks ago from fighters belonging to the Sudanese Revolutionary Front (SRF), a rebel alliance seeking to topple President Omar Hassan al-Bashir. Abu Kershola lies in the northeastern tip of the South Kordofan state, home to most Sudanese oil production. But the SRF struck back, attacking a convoy of Sudan's army chief of staff during a visit last week. The fighting in Abu Kershola has...
(Sudan Tribune 06/07/13)
Former South Sudanese rebel leader Johnson Uliny admitted receiving support from Sudan as his forces accepted a presidential amnesty and were met by senior military officials on Thursday. South Sudan has used Uliny’s admission and the testimony of other former rebels as evidence of its long held claim that Khartoum has been supporting rebel groups to fight a proxy war against the young oil-rich nation, which split from Sudan in 2011. “It is true I was in Sudan. The [Khartoum government cooperated with us in all areas. They provided any support we need including logistics and training when we were with them", Uliny said in an address broadcast on state media. He however said it was now time to work...

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