Monday 24 July 2017
(Xinhuanet 05/30/17)
Sudan said on Monday that it signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) on cooperation in fighting violent extremism. "The deal intends to address at-risk youth and vulnerable people potential to be affected by extremism and build national, state and civil society's capacities to prevent and address violent extremism in Sudan," Sudan's National Commission for Counter-Terrorism (SNCCT) said in a statement. The implementation period will last three years, it added. According to the MoU, the two parties will work to support the development of a national anti-extremism strategy that addresses capacity development
(BBC News Africa 05/30/17)
A surgeon, who is the only permanent doctor for 750,000 people, has been honoured for performing more than 1,000 operations a year in Sudan. Dr Tom Catena, 53, a Catholic missionary from New York, received the Aurora Prize for Awakening Humanity. He has worked in Sudan for more than 10 years, during the ongoing war between the government and rebel fighters. In his speech he urged the international community to help solve a dispute blocking humanitarian relief. Dr Catena is the only permanent doctor in the Nuba Mountains, where fighting between President Omar al-Bashir's government and rebels from the Sudanese People's Liberation Movement-North has been taking place. Listen to Dr Catena on BBC Focus on Africa. He has been praised...
(AfricaNews 05/29/17)
Sudanese foreign minister has cancelled a vital trip to Egypt following accusations by President Omar al-Bashir that Egypt is arming rebel groups to topple his government. “We told our brothers in Egypt about the postponement of the visit due to internal issues and it would take place later,” Foreign Minister Ibrahim Ghandour said in a statement on Sunday ahead of the May 31 trip that is meant to ease tensions between the neighbouring states. In a speech to Sudanese military personnel last week, Bashir said the army had seized Egyptian armoured vehicles from rebels in the country’s war-torn southern
(Reuters (Eng) 05/27/17)
Leaders of the Group of Seven wealthy nations met African heads of state on Saturday, the final day of their annual summit which has been marked by discord over climate change, but unity on tackling terrorism. Italy had hoped to make Africa the major focus of the annual G7 gathering, holding the discussions on the island of Sicily that has taken in hundreds of thousands of migrants over the past four years as they flee war and poverty back home. However, the two-day meeting got overshadowed by a suicide bombing in northern England on Monday that killed 22 people, and also got bogged down by lengthy discussions on the merit of free trade and the 2015 Paris Agreement to tackle...
(The East African 05/26/17)
South Sudanese authorities have dismissed claims of supporting rebels in Sudan, fighting to oust President Omar al-Bashir. Information minister Michael Makuei said the accusations by President Bashir against Juba and Egypt were completely false. President Bashir on Tuesday claimed that Juba and Cairo were offering military and logistical support to the Sudanese anti-government factions based in Darfur. He told the media in Khartoum that groups battling government forces, entered the Darfur region through South Sudan and Libya and were well armed with Egyptian armoured vehicles for the attacks on two states last Sunday. However, Mr Makuei said South Sudan and Egypt had not offered any support to any Sudanese rebels. "With due respect to their opinion, that is not correct...
(AFP (eng) 05/26/17)
Entertainment | France | film | festival | Cannes | Zambia | witchcraft Cannes, France | AFP | Friday 5/26/2017 - 14:01 UTC+3 | 615 words by Katy Lee Being accused of witchcraft is no laughing matter in Africa -- but movie director Rungano Nyoni decided a dose of humour was just what was needed to tackle a problem rampant in parts of the continent. Set in Zambia, the sharp satire "I Am Not A Witch" has premiered to strong reviews at the Cannes film festival, taking aim at the blatant sexism behind accusations that overwhelmingly target women. White tourists are seen gawping at women detained in a "witch camp" in the movie, taking pictures of them as if they're...
(Egypt Independent 05/24/17)
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has resumed his allegations against Egypt, saying that his armed forces seized Egyptian armored vehicles during recent clashes in Darfur that took place last week. On Tuesday, Bashir renewed his accusations against Cairo over backing the rebels there. “We fought along with Egyptians in 1976. We fought for twenty years without being supported with a bullet. The ammunition we bought from them was not working,” Bashir told the army command in Khartoum. However, Egypt denied all the Sudanese accusations through the Foreign Ministry spokesperson who stressed
(Ahram Online 05/24/17)
The statement from Egypt's foreign ministry comes in response to 'Sudanese statements accusing Egypt of supporting Darfur rebel groups'. Egypt respects the sovereignty of Sudan and would not interfere to destabilise it or harm its people, the country’s foreign ministry said in a statement Tuesday in response to “Sudanese statements accusing Egypt of supporting Darfur rebel groups.” Egypt’s foreign policy, according to the statement, is based on respecting international law and principles of good neighbourliness, especially when it comes to countries that have a special brotherly bond with Egypt such as Sudan. “[Everyone] knows that Egypt was a major supporter of the unification of the north and south of Sudan, and that it made every effort to make unity the...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/24/17)
When U.S. President Donald Trump and other leaders of the world's seven major industrialized nations gather in Sicily on Friday, they will enjoy a spectacular view of the Mediterranean Sea, but won't get any glimpse of boats full of migrants. A common sight off Sicily in recent years, the authorities have banned all migrant landings on the island during the Group of Seven Summit for security reasons, telling rescue vessels that pick them up at sea to take them to the mainland during the two-day meeting. Out of sight does not mean out of mind. Italy chose to host the summit in Taormina, on the cliffs of eastern Sicily, to concentrate minds on Europe's migrant crisis and to seek ways...
(Bloomberg 05/23/17)
A rebel group that’s waged a six-year war against Sudan’s government will ask the U.S. to postpone a sanctions review on the African country beyond a July deadline as it accuses President Umar al-Bashir’s forces of breaching a cease-fire and blocking aid to civilians. The Obama administration in January ordered the reversal of some of the economic sanctions the U.S. imposed on Sudan in 1997, four years after it was listed as a state sponsor of terrorism. The leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North, which has fought in the country’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile provinces since 2011
(Andalou Agency 05/23/17)
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir on Tuesday accused Egypt of arming rebel groups in the troubled Darfur region. In an address to top army brass, Bashir said Sudanese forces have captured Egyptian weapons during clashes with rebels in the East Darfur state. He said Sudanese forces had intercepted two rebel convoys coming from Libya and South Sudan. "We defeated them, destroying 59 military vehicles," Bashir said. "Unfortunately we captured Egyptian tanks and armors in the hands of the rebels," he claimed. Tension has grown between Sudan and Egypt in recent months. Last month, Sudanese Foreign Minister Ibrahim Ghandour accused Egypt's UN representative of supporting calls to extend international sanctions -- in place since 2006 -- on Sudan, a claim denied by...
(Xinhuanet 05/23/17)
The tripartite mechanism of Sudan's government, the United Nations and the African Union on Monday approved a joint work plan stipulating gradual withdrawal of the United Nations-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) from many areas in the region. The tripartite mechanism on Monday held a meeting in Khartoum and reviewed the situations in Darfur with the focus on UNAMID's exit strategy from the region. "At the end of the meeting the heads of the three delegations signed a joint communique," said Sudan's Foreign Ministry in a statement. "The communique reiterated full improvement of the security and humanitarian conditions in all Darfur states, and approved the recommendations earlier agreed upon which stipulate gradual exit of UNAMID from many areas and restructuring...
(APA 05/23/17)
The United Nations-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) has put its troops on high alert in fighting zones recently erupted between government forces and armed movements. "Clashes between Sudanese government forces and non-signatory armed forces have occurred in the past few days in eastern and northern Darfur, resulting in multiple casualties," UNAMSIL's joint UNAMIR Special Representative Jermaya Mamabolo said in a statement on Tuesday. He stressed that "The mission is very concerned about these developments," "There has been significant progress towards peace and security in Darfur, and it would be a terrible setback to see such gains being jeopardized," Mamabolo added. UNAMID called on all parties concerned in the recent fighting to exercise restraint and take the peace process as...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/23/17)
Fossils from Greece and Bulgaria of an ape-like creature that lived 7.2 million years ago may fundamentally alter the understanding of human origins, casting doubt on the view that the evolutionary lineage that led to people arose in Africa. Scientists said on Monday the creature, known as Graecopithecus freybergi and known only from a lower jawbone and an isolated tooth, may be the oldest-known member of the human lineage that began after an evolutionary split from the line that led to chimpanzees, our closest cousins. The jawbone, which included teeth, was unearthed in 1944 in Athens. The premolar was found in south-central Bulgaria in 2009. The researchers examined them using sophisticated new techniques including CT scans and established their age...
(Bloomberg 05/22/17)
A rebel group that’s waged a six-year war against Sudan’s government will ask the U.S. to postpone a sanctions review on the African country beyond a July deadline as it accuses President Umar al-Bashir’s forces of breaching a cease-fire and blocking aid to civilians. The Obama administration in January ordered the reversal of some of the economic sanctions the U.S. imposed on Sudan in 1997, four years after it was listed as a state sponsor of terrorism. The leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/22/17)
Countries in sub-Saharan Africa need to get their budgets in order, diversify their economies and look after their poorest people. If they do that, there is no reason why the region cannot have the strong growth needed to meet the aspirations of a young and growing population. That, at least, is the three-pillared prescription from the International Monetary Fund as expressed by one of its top Africa researchers, Celine Allard, in an official IMF blog post and podcast. Allard co-authored the Fund's regional economic outlook, released earlier this month. It found that sub-Saharan economic growth hit only 1.4 percent last year, the lowest level in two decades and well off the 5-6 percent rates normally reached. It was also well...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/20/17)
France will step up the fight against resurgent Islamist militants in north and west Africa and will work more closely with Germany to help the tinderbox region, President Emmanuel Macron said on his first trip outside Europe on Friday. Visiting Mali days after taking office, Macron vowed to keep French troops in the Sahel region until there was "no more Islamist terrorism" there. He said operations would be escalated in response to signs that militant groups were regrouping and uniting. "It is vital today that we speed up. Our armed forces are giving their all, but we must speed up" efforts to secure the Sahel, he told a news conference in Gao, Mali, where he held talks with President Ibrahim...
(AFP (eng) 05/19/17)
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, who is wanted by the International Criminal Court, will not join an Islamic summit in Saudi Arabia with US President Donald Trump, his office said Friday. "President Omar al-Bashir has apologised to King Salman of Saudi Arabia for being unable to attend the Riyadh summit," a statement from his office carried by the official SUNA news agency said. It said he had been unable to accept the king's invitation for "personal reasons." Bashir has evaded arrest since his indictment by the ICC for alleged genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity related to the 14-year-old conflict in Darfur that has killed tens of thousands of people. His planned attendance at Sunday's summit of Arab and Muslim...
(Xinhuanet 05/19/17)
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir apologized on Friday for not being able to attend the upcoming Arab Islamic American Summit in the Saudi capital Riyadh, official SUNA news agency reported. "The President of the Republic has apologized for not attending the summit for special reasons and tasked the State Minister at the Presidency and Director of his offices Gen. Taha Al-Hussein to represent him at the summit and participate in all its activities," SUNA said. Al-Bashir wished the leaders participating in the summit all success, expressing hope that the summit would serve the interests of humanity and achieve its objectives. He also expressed hope that the summit would achieve international peace and security, form a new partnership to confront extremism and...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/19/17)
When rich countries wrote off billions of dollars of African debt in 2005, they hoped governments would think twice about borrowing again in costly foreign currencies. Over a decade later, most sub-Saharan African countries still rely on U.S. dollar-denominated debt to finance their economies. Some investors say this is sowing the seeds of future debt crises if local currencies devalue and make dollar debt repayments more expensive. Aside from South Africa and Nigeria, governments have not yet done enough to develop capital markets that would have allowed them to raise more money in their own currencies, investors say. United Nations trade body UNCTAD estimates that Africa's external debt stock rapidly grew to $443 billion by 2013 through bilateral borrowing, syndicated...

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