Monday 24 July 2017
(Reuters (Eng) 05/18/17)
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir will attend a gathering in Saudi Arabia on Saturday but has received no indication whether he will meet U.S. President Donald Trump there, Sudan's foreign minister said on Wednesday. Bashir is wanted for war crimes by the International Criminal Court (ICC) and is shunned by Western leaders, so any direct contact would be a diplomatic bombshell, despite thawing relations between Washington and Khartoum in recent months. Trump's visit to Saudi Arabia on Saturday is the first stop on his maiden international trip as president that will also take him to Israel and Europe. "On the question of the Trump-Bashir handshake, nobody can pretend
(Xinhuanet 05/18/17)
The Humanitarian Aid Commission (HAC) in Sudan's White Nile State said on Thursday that the number of South Sudanese refugees in the state has amounted to 140,000, according to the latest statistics by Sudan's Commission of Refugees. "The White Nile State has established eight camps to accommodate the continuing influxes of refugees from South Sudan," Mohamed Idriss Al-Sheikh, HAC commissioner in White Nile State, told journalists visiting the state. He reiterated that local authorities are providing all services, including food, education, health and water, to the refugees. The official also said there were no security problems inside the refugee camps in White Nile, denying previous reports about spread of diseases such as watery diarrhoea because of the intensive presence of...
(Bloomberg 05/18/17)
Steinhoff International Holdings NV plans to list its African assets separately as the acquisitive retailer seeks a new prize for shareholders following this year’s failed merger talks with Shoprite Holdings Ltd. The company said Wednesday it will seek to list businesses including clothing retailer Pepkor and furniture chain JD Group Ltd. on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, about 18 months after moving its primary listing to Frankfurt from the South African commercial hub. The new business could be worth as much as 60 billion rand ($4.5 billion), said Evan Walker, a money manager at 36one Asset Management in Johannesburg, although the valuation could also be as low as 40 billion rand depending on how much debt Steinhoff puts into the vehicle...
(AFP (eng) 05/17/17)
Saudi Arabia has invited Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, who is wanted for alleged war crimes, to a summit with US President Donald Trump and Arab and Muslim leaders, a Saudi official said Wednesday. "He (Bashir) is invited," the official told AFP without saying whether the Sudanese leader would attend the top-level talks on Sunday. Trump is scheduled to visit Saudi Arabia, home to Islam's holiest sites, from Saturday on his first foreign trip since taking office in January. He will address the summit on his "hopes for a peaceful vision of Islam," the White House said Tuesday. Bashir has evaded arrest since his indictment by the International Criminal Court in 2009 for alleged genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/17/17)
Gay and lesbian Africans who fled abuse in their home countries face a "culture of disbelief" which makes their experience of seeking asylum in Britain traumatic, a Nigerian lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender rights (LGBT) campaigner said. Aderonke Apata, 50, who fled persecution in Nigeria, said the practice of assessing Africans' sexual orientation claims based on Western standards was problematic. "They expect an LGBT person to have used sex toys, to go to gay clubs," Apata, an asylum seeker who founded African LGBT charity, African Rainbow Family, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Apata has been trying to claim asylum in Britain for 13 years, but her case was refused several times after a judge ruled that she was pretending to be...
(Xinhuanet 05/16/17)
Sudan said on Monday that the African Union Peace and Security Council (AUPSC) has reiterated its support for Sudan's efforts to end the armed conflict in Darfur region. The comment came as an AUPSC delegation started a four-day visit to Sudan, which includes a tour in the region of Darfur which has been suffering from a civil war since 2003. "The delegation has praised the great improvement in all the situations in Darfur and the cooperation between the government and the AUPSC in addition to the great facilities provided by the government to the United Nations African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID)," Sudan's Foreign Ministry said in a press release on Monday. "The AUPSC reiterated its strong support to Sudan...
(Bloomberg 05/16/17)
When the impoverished West African nation of Niger imposed a ban on donkey exports last year, a small community of traders just over the border in Nigeria was devastated. “Before the ban, you could see thousands of donkeys here,” said Mohammed Sani, a 45-year-old trader in the Nigerian town of Jibiya, as he wiped the sweat off his brow. “Now look at them: there’s no more than 50, crippling the business.” Donkeys are being slaughtered at an alarming pace to feed a global trade in donkey hides that’s fueled by soaring demand in China, where the skins are used to manufacture a gelatin believed to have anti-ageing and libido-enhancing properties. The gelatin, known in China as e’jiao, is so popular...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/13/17)
Tackling climate change in Africa could help resolve multiple problems ravaging the continent, from drought to refugees and violence, the head of the African Union said on Friday. The mix of global warming with economic woes and political conflicts keeps peace from taking hold, said Moussa Faki Mahamat, the Union's new chairman, at Chatham House, an international think tank. "There is a link between climate change and prosperity, as well as peace, on the continent," Mahamat said in French with an interpreter. "Africa is among the least polluting continents, and yet it is the continent that suffers most," he said. Mahamat, the former foreign minister of Chad, was chosen to chair the 55-member, Addis Ababa-based organization in January. In Africa's...
(AFP (eng) 05/12/17)
Sudan's first prime minister since 1989 has named a new government and vowed to resolve insurgencies in border regions and heal the country's crisis-wracked economy. The new cabinet was unveiled late Thursday by Bakri Hassan Saleh, appointed in March as Sudan's first prime minister since the post was scrapped in an Islamist-backed coup that brought President Omar al-Bashir to power. Saleh said the government would prioritise "increasing production, improving people's living standards and achieving peace." Sudan has been rocked by years of conflict with rebels in the vast western region of Darfur and the southern Blue Nile and South Kordofan states. Bashir is wanted by the Hague-based International Criminal Court (ICC) on charges of genocide and war crimes related to...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/12/17)
Sudanese Prime Minister Hassan Saleh announced a new government on Thursday, with changes to economic ministers including the oil, investment and finance chiefs. Sudan's constitution was amended in December to introduce the position of prime minister, a demand of opposition parties that took part in a national dialogue with the government, with the aim of redistributing some of the president's extensive powers. President Omar Hassan al-Bashir's long war against various rebel groups has coincided with a severe economic downturn. This year's budget foresees a growing deficit and slower growth. The economic problems have been building since the south seceded in 2011
(The East African 05/11/17)
A deal between Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan signed in December 2015 whereby the three countries agreed to end tensions over River Nile water faces an unclear future due to ongoing tensions between Egypt and Sudan. The two downstream countries at the end of April agreed to de-escalate tensions and end counter-accusations as well as import bans and deportations had brought relations between the two countries to tipping point. As the two neighbours bicker, Ethiopia continued its quest to bring Nile Basin countries on its side as its Grand Renaissance Dam nearing completion. Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn was in Rwanda last week and during the two-day state visit signed a co-operation deal with his Rwandan counterpart Paul Kagame on the...
(Fox News 05/10/17)
After five years of no major attacks on merchant vessels, piracy around the Horn of Africa seemed to be on hiatus. Acts of piracy in those treacherous waters have fallen sharply since 2012, according to statistics released by the United States Navy. The Navy credits aggressive patrolling by international forces and increased vigilance by the commercial shipping industry for the decrease. However, in the past month, Somali pirates have intercepted five ships, raising concerns that piracy has returned to the Indian Ocean, beginning with the kidnapping of a Sri Lankan crew from the Aris 13 oil tanker on March 13th (they were later released without a ransom). Nobody thinks the problem will end until a stable government is restored in...
(Sudan Tribune 05/08/17)
Ethiopia and Sudanese police have signed an agreement to further boost peace and security cooperation between the two neighbours, the state-run Ethiopia Broadcasting Corporation reported on Sunday. The accord was signed after a Sudanese police delegation held discussions with their Ethiopian counterparts in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa. Ethiopian federal police commissioner, Asefa Abiyu said previous cooperation agreements signed between Ethiopia and Sudan were successful, stressing needs for more efforts to sustain the momentum. He underlined the need for more joint efforts to tackle human and drug trafficking, terrorism as well as other border security threats. The cooperation deal between the Sudanese and Ethiopian police institutions could be a model for the region or the continent as a whole in different...
(Reuters (Eng) 05/08/17)
A Frenchman who was kidnapped in Chad in March and taken to the Darfur area of Sudan has been rescued in a raid organised by France, Chad and Sudan and was handed over to French authorities on Sunday, Sudanese officials said. They said the kidnappers had demanded an undisclosed ransom for Thierry Frezier, an employee of a French mining company operating in Chad. He was abducted south of Abeche, a mining area about 800 km (500 miles) east of Chad's capital, N'Djamena, and 150 km from the border with Sudan. Frezier arrived on Sunday morning in the Sudanese capital Khartoum, where he was handed over to French embassy officials at the airport. "I was treated well during my kidnapping .....
(AFP (eng) 05/07/17)
A French mineworker who was kidnapped in Chad and taken to neighbouring Sudan has been freed after more than six weeks in captivity, the French president's office said Sunday. President Francois Hollande feels "great pleasure" over the release, his office said in a statement. Sudanese security agents launched a search for the man, whose identity has not been revealed, in late March after a Chadian minister said he was being held there. The man was kidnapped near Goz Beida, in southeastern Chad, on March 23. Several French and other Western nationals have been kidnapped by jihadist groups in west and central Africa in recent years.
(Radio Dabanga 05/05/17)
Sudan's Popular Congress Party says its participation in the new National Reconciliation Government to be announced today is expected to include two ministers, a state minister, five seats in the Parliament and two seats in the States Council. PCP head Dr Ali El Haj told a news conference on Wednesday that his list of representatives in the government included Musa Mohammed Karama, Minister of Industry, Idris Suleiman, Minister of International Cooperation and Saaduldin Hussein El Bushra, State Minister of the Ministry of Communications, Information and Technology. In the Parliament, Ali El Haj said that the party has five seats including the head of a committee for which Dr Bashir Adam Rahma
(Radio Dabanga 05/05/17)
The Sudanese Journalists Network says that the Sudanese press is still facing real problems, most importantly by the state's prior and pre-censorship of newspapers and violations of journalists' rights. Speaking on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day yesterday, the network confirmed the rise in the violations against the press in 2016 and predicted a rise during the last half of this year. Hassan Barkiya, the member of the Journalists' Network told Radio Dabanga that the Sudanese press is facing real problems, including authoritarian interventions by the state and structural problems related to the press institutions themselves and the press industry. He said that the press is working in an unfavourable legal and political environment that restricts press freedom, hinders...
(Radio Dabanga 05/05/17)
Hundreds of South Sudanese refugees have been pouring into a new administrative camp on the border with South Kordofan - latest counts reflect 20,000 people. Gadim Babakir Adam, the Commissioner of Abu Jubeiha locality in South Kordofan gave reporters this figure yesterday, and described the humanitarian situation of refugees fleeing famine from South Sudan as difficult. He called for urgent and emergency humanitarian interventions. He urged the international and national organisations working in the field of voluntary and humanitarian work, HAC and UNHCR to play their full role towards the refugees. Commissioner Adam praised their good reception and hosting of the new refugees. Last week, the United Nations Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in Sudan, Marta Ruedas, welcomed the decision by...
(Voice of America 05/05/17)
As Africa grapples with a severe drought, and famine threatens millions of people, experts at the World Economic Forum on Africa this week in the South African city of Durban say food security needs to be a major part of discussions on advancing the continent economically. The annual World Economic Forum in Switzerland is usually a high-powered event, but at this week’s Africa meeting of the international organization, the continent’s big players are welcoming the humble farmer, now known as the “agripreneur.” Agricultural economist Paul Makube, with South Africa’s First National Bank, told VOA it makes sense to talk about farming when discussing building competitive markets, and boosting innovation and technology. “For business to prosper, you need a situation where...
(Xinhuanet 05/04/17)
The World Economic Forum (WEF) Africa Competitiveness Report 2017 released in Durban Thursday called for urgent policy reforms if the continent intends to create more jobs for its growing young population. According to the report issued at the 27th WEF on Africa, fewer than one-quarter of the 450 million new jobs required in the next 20 years will be created if current policies remain unchanged. The report called for structural reforms in the economies to create more jobs for the youth entering the market. African countries have to prioritize improving infrastructure, skills and adoption of new technology and quality of institutions. To improve competitiveness in the short term Africa needs to increase housing construction through investment, better urban planning and...

Pages