Sunday 25 February 2018
(Google News 02/26/13)
Swaziland's three national security chiefs are to join a growing number of ruling elite in the undemocratic kingdom to receive bullet-proof cars. Umbutfo Swaziland Defence Force (USDF) Commander Lieutenant Sobantu Dlamini, Royal Swaziland Police (RSP) Commissioner Isaac Magagula and His Majesty's Correctional Services (HMCS) Commissioner Isaiah Mzuthini Ntshangase are each to receive BMW 2013 X5 cars at a total cost of E4 million. They join about 20 members of the Swazi Royal family, headed by King Mswati III, who already have top-of-the-range Mercedes S600 Pullman Guard cars that can withstand an armoured missile assault. Local media in Swaziland have been reporting that the latest three cars are ready to be delivered from Germany next month (March 2013). But, nobody is...
(Yahoo 02/26/13)
Information just released by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) confirms that Swaziland's Finance Minister Majozi Sithole lied when he said the kingdom's economy had recovered. Last month (January 2013), Sithole said that receipts of E12.2 billion (US$1.1 billion) due this year to Swaziland, mostly from the Southern African Customs Union (SACU), meant, 'I can safely say the economy is now under control. We have survived the worst economic challenges ever.' Then, earlier this month, the Times of Swaziland newspaper falsely reported in a headline, 'Financial crisis in Swaziland is over - IMF'. It said, 'It is now official; Swaziland is out of the financial crisis it had plunged into since 2010, the IMF has declared.' The paper then allowed Sithole...
(Google News 02/19/13)
Mbabane — As the Swazi government struggles to guarantee a no-cost nationwide primary school system, it finds itself sparring against school principals over the question if it is a lack of funds or an abundance of corruption that is standing in the way of its success. Most recently, the government has asked principals of public primary schools to return an annual top-up fee they have been charging their pupils, without government authority, since the Free Primary Education Programme (FPEP) was introduced here in 2009. It is a request that some principals have refused, saying it could bankrupt many schools in this southern African nation. One principal, who asked for anonymity, told IPS that it was not feasible to refund parents...

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