Sunday 10 December 2017
(AFP (eng) 11/17/17)
Africa is making only faltering progress towards food and nutrition security, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has warned. "Multiple forms of malnutrition coexist, with countries experiencing simultaneously high rates of child undernutrition or anaemia as well as high rates of obesity," it says in a new report, Regional Overview of Food Security and Nutrition. In sub-Saharan Africa, "progress towards the World Health Assembly global nutrition targets has been generally poor," the Rome-based agency says, referring to goals to end hunger by 2025. The annual document came out Thursday at the start of a two-day food and health seminar in Ivory Coast's economic capital, Abidjan. Around 200 people from 47 African nations are gathered to discuss "sustainable food systems...
(AFP (eng) 11/15/17)
Eleven people have died after a plane belonging to a safari company crashed in northern Tanzania, according to the aircraft's owners, Coastal Aviation. "We are deeply saddened to report that eleven people have died after a single-plane accident this morning in Northern Tanzania," the company said in a statement published on its website. Coastal Aviation, which conducts flying safaris in East Africa, said the Cessna Caravan, carrying a pilot and 10 passengers, had crashed in the Empakaai crater area. The names of passengers and crew were being withheld so their families could be informed. "Obviously, we are in shock. This is devastating," said Coastal Aviation managing director Julian Edmunds. "I fly our planes regularly. I have the utmost faith in...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/14/17)
DAR ES SALAAM (Reuters) - Tanzania’s tourism minister ordered a corruption investigation into his predecessor on Monday, just two weeks after the former post-holder quit the ruling party and joined the opposition. Hamisi Kigwangalla, in charge of regulating one of Tanzania’s most lucrative sectors, told parliament he had asked the anti-corruption watchdog to look into allegations of abuse of office by Lazaro Nyalandu. Nyalandu took to Twitter to deny any wrongdoing and called the announcement a smear campaign meant to stop anyone else jumping ship. He quit the ruling Chama Cha Mapinduzi party on Oct 30 and joined the main opposition CHADEMA, citing rights abuses and a weakening...
(AFP (eng) 11/14/17)
Female domestic workers from Tanzania are being physically and sexually abused and exploited by employers in the Gulf, a rights group said Tuesday. In a 100-page report on treatment of East African female domestic workers in Oman and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Human Rights Watch (HRW) said workers "face excessive working hours, unpaid salaries, and physical and sexual abuse." "Many Tanzanian domestic workers in Oman and the UAE are overworked, underpaid, and abused behind closed doors," said Rothna Begum, a women's rights researcher with the New York-based watchdog. "Workers who fled abusive employers or agents told us the police or their own embassy officials forced them to go back, or they had to relinquish their salaries and spend months...
(APA 11/14/17)
Tanzania’s government has lifted ban on maize export following mammoth harvests, which the National Food Reserve Agency (NFRA) can hardly exhaust. This was announced Tuesday by the Minister for Agriculture, Food Security and Cooperatives, Charles Tizeba, in Dodoma at the ongoing National Assembly session, which has been debating the 2018 draft fiscal budget and proposed National Development Plan. According to Tizeba, the move comes after an assessment of the current food stock against the NFRA’s budget for maize purchases. The bumper maize harvests cannot all be bought by the government, which has now opened the door to exports to allow next farming circle to move on smoothly. In June 2017, Prime Minister Kassim Majaliwa announced a ban on maize exports,...
(Xinhuanet 11/14/17)
The Tanzanian government said Monday it had lifted a ban on maize exports to the East African Community (EAC) and other African countries following an outcry from farmers amid surplus harvests. Charles Tizeba, Minister for Agriculture, directed regional and district executives to put in place proper mechanisms to ensure the exports were done legally. "Let farmers sell maize to markets of their choices, but they will have to seek permits from the ministry and approval from regional leaders," he told the National Assembly in Dodoma. He said Members of Parliament have since the beginning of the ongoing parliamentary meetings complained about the huge grain stocks following bumper harvests. The government has for a long period sustained the ban on export...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/14/17)
KIGALI (Reuters) - The global airline industry has $1.2 billion blocked in nine dollar-strapped African countries, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) said on Monday. The global commodities price crash that began in 2014 hit economies across Africa hard, particularly big resource exporters such as Angola and Nigeria. Low oil and mineral prices have reduced government revenue and caused chronic dollar shortages and immense pressure on local currencies. The fiscal slump has meant governments have not allowed foreign airlines to repatriate their dollar profits in full. At an aviation meeting in the Rwandan capital, IATA’s Vice President for Africa, Raphale Kuuchi, said that airlines were in talks with “a few governments to unblock airline funds”. He did not specify the...
(AFP (eng) 11/13/17)
A Tanzanian movie actress was on Monday sentenced to two years in prison for involuntary manslaughter, over the 2012 death of her lover, who was one of the country's most adored stars. Elizabeth Michael, 22, who goes by the stage name "Lulu", admitted to pushing her partner Steven Kanumba during an argument in their home, which resulted in his death. According to the judgement, the court found that "evidence provided during the trial proved the accused involuntarily caused the death" of Kanumba, a rising young star in the country at the time. Michael had said Kanumba, 28, was drunk and beating her at the time of the incident. An investigation found that he died of a head injury. Judge Sam...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/13/17)
DAR ES SALAAM (Reuters) - Two East African presidents on Saturday condemned a decision by the International Criminal Court to open a war crimes investigation into Burundi, saying it undermined regional peace initiatives. The court ordered a formal investigation on Thursday into crimes committed in Burundi from April 2015 to October 2017. “Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has condemned the decision of the International Criminal Court (ICC), which ordered its prosecutor to launch an investigation into the Burundi conflict,” Tanzania’s presidency said in a statement on Saturday. Museveni is the current chairman of the East African Community (EAC) regional...
(AFP (eng) 11/13/17)
Ministers from 13 European and African countries on Monday pledged steps to ease the migrant crisis around the Mediterranean, vowing especially to improve conditions for migrants held in Libya. Interior ministers and other representatives from countries impacted by the ongoing wave of migration up through Africa towards Europe, including Libya, voiced deep concern over the "ongoing human tragedy" along the so-called Central Mediterranean route. "The participants intend to address the challenges posed by the alarming situation along the migration route to North Africa," Switzerland, which hosted the third meeting of the so-called contact group on the crisis, said in a statement. Thousands of migrants and refugees who attempt to travel along this route "find themselves in catastrophic situations," it said,...
(AFP (eng) 11/11/17)
Tanzanian President John Magufuli and his Ugandan counterpart Yoweri Museveni on Saturday criticised the International Criminal Court (ICC) for launching a probe into alleged crimes committed during Burundi's political crisis. A statement from the Tanzanian presidency said the two leaders had condemned the move, during a meeting in western Uganda. "President Magufuli said this decision compromised efforts by the East African Community, which has put in place a committee charged with seeking a resolution to the Burundi conflict, led by President Yoweri Museveni and former Tanzanian president Benjamin Mkapa," said the statement.
(AFP (eng) 11/09/17)
A diplomatic spat over cows and chickens has worsened already frosty ties between Kenya and Tanzania, with Nairobi lodging a formal protest against its neighbour, the foreign minister said Wednesday. The latest impasse between the two east African nations began last month when Tanzania seized and auctioned off 1,300 cattle which had wandered across the border to graze in a region where herders typically pay little heed to frontiers. Then, last week, Tanzania seized and burnt alive 6,500 chicks that had been brought into the country by a trader, fearing they would spread disease. Kenyan Foreign Minister Amina Mohamed said the country's representative at the East African Community (EAC)...
(AFP (eng) 11/08/17)
At least five children were killed Wednesday while playing with a grenade at a school in northern Tanzania, a local official told AFP. "We regret the death of five children, there are 23 others injured," said Adroniz Rurindoli, a local government official in the Ngara region, where the school is located. "The accident happened this morning (Wednesday). The children were playing with this grenade which they thought was just a simple metallic object," he said. Rurindoli said the victims were all aged between seven and nine years old. str-fb/tmc/dl
(AFP (eng) 11/08/17)
Tanzanian police carried out a raid Tuesday night on the headquarters of an opposition party which recently criticised the state of the economy under President John Magufuli. "The police have just ended a raid on the headquarters of the Alliance for Change and Transparency (ACT) Wazalendo," read a statement from the party. The party, whose leader Zitto Kabwe is fiercely critical of the government and has been arrested three times since main opposition chief Tundu Lissu of the Chadema party was shot and wounded in September, said police had seized a laptop, a flashdrive and a recent press statement. The statement, issued on October 12, had criticised "the bad state of the economy, the deterioration of security and the narrowing...
(AfricaNews 11/08/17)
Tanzania president John Pombe Magufuli has fired two municipal council heads after they failed to recall government allocations for road projects under their districts. A statement from the presidency said the duo – director of the Bukoba Municipal Council, Erasto Aron Mfugale, and the director of the Bukoba Rural Municipal Council, Mwantum Kitwana Dau – were to be reassigned roles. Their dismissal is, however, linked to a public event in the lakeside town of Bukoba where Magufuli had gone to launch a new airport. They were summoned to give figures on government allocations but failed. A displeased Magufuli is quoted at saying, “You can’t talk to me like that,” after Dau said her failure to recall the figures was because...
(AFP (eng) 11/08/17)
A dozen other students look on as Umar Amadu uses a glass pipette to draw a solution from a conical flask as part of a chemistry experiment. It could be a scene from any school laboratory around the world, but until two months ago Amadu and his fellow students had no access to any science equipment. Science subjects at his rural secondary school outside the city of Katsina in northern Nigeria were taught using theory only. But now they have all the kit they need to put theory into practice, thanks to a mobile science lab that tours selected state schools. "It's an exciting experience. We were being taught only the theoretical aspect of science subjects," Amadu, who wants to...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/07/17)
CAPE TOWN (Reuters) - Ride-hailing service Uber Technologies Inc. [UBER.UL] is growing rapidly in sub-Saharan Africa and considering moves into more markets, despite sometimes violent opposition from metered taxi drivers, a senior executive said on Tuesday. Uber’s service has triggered protests by rivals from London to New Delhi as it up-ends traditional business models that require professional drivers to pay steep licensing fees to do business. “We are bullish on Africa. The growth here is still substantial and we think that given the right regulatory environment, the growth could be even better,” Justin Spratt, head of business development for the sub-Saharan region, told Reuters. “Africa’s growth thus far has been faster than America and a large part of that is...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/06/17)
JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Africa’s mobile internet connections are set to double in the next five years, a study showed on Monday, thanks to affordable smartphones and the roll-out of high-speed networks. A report by research and consulting firm Ovum in London estimates that mobile broadband connections will rise from 419 million at the end of this year to 1.07 billion by the end of 2022. “Data connectivity is growing strongly in Africa, and there are also good prospects on the continent in areas such as digital media, mobile financial services, and the Internet of Things,” said Matthew Reed, Practice Leader Middle East and Africa at Ovum. “But as Africa’s TMT market becomes more convergent and complex, service providers are under...
(AFP (eng) 11/04/17)
Tanzanian marathon runner Ismael Juma died on Thursday when his motorbike collided with a lorry, Athletics Tanzania (AT) announced on Friday. The 26-year-old was one of Tanzania's hopes for a medal at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia in April. "Tanzania athletics has lost one of its top long distance runners," AT secretary general Wilhelm Gidabuday told AFP. "Ismail Juma was one of 19 athletes selected to start training later this month for the Commonwealth Games in Australia." Gidabuday said Juma was heading to the northern town of Arusha when his bike was involved in a head-on collision with a truck. He died at the scene. The runner was expected to compete in the New Delhi half marathon on...
(AFP (eng) 11/03/17)
US politicians are voicing concern over America's growing military presence across Africa, where they worry the Pentagon is getting ever more embroiled in a secretive campaign against a shifting enemy. Last month's killing of four US soldiers in a Niger ambush has thrust the issue into the spotlight, with lawmakers calling for greater transparency on what is going on in Africa. "The footprint in Africa is much bigger than the American public understands," Democratic Senator Tim Kaine said this week. The Niger ambush has also rekindled debate over the legal authorities the Pentagon uses to fight jihadist groups overseas, particularly in Africa where about 6,000 US troops are deployed across the vast continent. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis this week faced...

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