Thursday 19 April 2018
(AFP (eng) 11/13/17)
Ministers from 13 European and African countries on Monday pledged steps to ease the migrant crisis around the Mediterranean, vowing especially to improve conditions for migrants held in Libya. Interior ministers and other representatives from countries impacted by the ongoing wave of migration up through Africa towards Europe, including Libya, voiced deep concern over the "ongoing human tragedy" along the so-called Central Mediterranean route. "The participants intend to address the challenges posed by the alarming situation along the migration route to North Africa," Switzerland, which hosted the third meeting of the so-called contact group on the crisis, said in a statement. Thousands of migrants and refugees who attempt to travel along this route "find themselves in catastrophic situations," it said,...
(AFP (eng) 11/11/17)
Tanzanian President John Magufuli and his Ugandan counterpart Yoweri Museveni on Saturday criticised the International Criminal Court (ICC) for launching a probe into alleged crimes committed during Burundi's political crisis. A statement from the Tanzanian presidency said the two leaders had condemned the move, during a meeting in western Uganda. "President Magufuli said this decision compromised efforts by the East African Community, which has put in place a committee charged with seeking a resolution to the Burundi conflict, led by President Yoweri Museveni and former Tanzanian president Benjamin Mkapa," said the statement.
(AFP (eng) 11/09/17)
A diplomatic spat over cows and chickens has worsened already frosty ties between Kenya and Tanzania, with Nairobi lodging a formal protest against its neighbour, the foreign minister said Wednesday. The latest impasse between the two east African nations began last month when Tanzania seized and auctioned off 1,300 cattle which had wandered across the border to graze in a region where herders typically pay little heed to frontiers. Then, last week, Tanzania seized and burnt alive 6,500 chicks that had been brought into the country by a trader, fearing they would spread disease. Kenyan Foreign Minister Amina Mohamed said the country's representative at the East African Community (EAC)...
(AFP (eng) 11/08/17)
At least five children were killed Wednesday while playing with a grenade at a school in northern Tanzania, a local official told AFP. "We regret the death of five children, there are 23 others injured," said Adroniz Rurindoli, a local government official in the Ngara region, where the school is located. "The accident happened this morning (Wednesday). The children were playing with this grenade which they thought was just a simple metallic object," he said. Rurindoli said the victims were all aged between seven and nine years old. str-fb/tmc/dl
(AFP (eng) 11/08/17)
Tanzanian police carried out a raid Tuesday night on the headquarters of an opposition party which recently criticised the state of the economy under President John Magufuli. "The police have just ended a raid on the headquarters of the Alliance for Change and Transparency (ACT) Wazalendo," read a statement from the party. The party, whose leader Zitto Kabwe is fiercely critical of the government and has been arrested three times since main opposition chief Tundu Lissu of the Chadema party was shot and wounded in September, said police had seized a laptop, a flashdrive and a recent press statement. The statement, issued on October 12, had criticised "the bad state of the economy, the deterioration of security and the narrowing...
(AfricaNews 11/08/17)
Tanzania president John Pombe Magufuli has fired two municipal council heads after they failed to recall government allocations for road projects under their districts. A statement from the presidency said the duo – director of the Bukoba Municipal Council, Erasto Aron Mfugale, and the director of the Bukoba Rural Municipal Council, Mwantum Kitwana Dau – were to be reassigned roles. Their dismissal is, however, linked to a public event in the lakeside town of Bukoba where Magufuli had gone to launch a new airport. They were summoned to give figures on government allocations but failed. A displeased Magufuli is quoted at saying, “You can’t talk to me like that,” after Dau said her failure to recall the figures was because...
(AFP (eng) 11/08/17)
A dozen other students look on as Umar Amadu uses a glass pipette to draw a solution from a conical flask as part of a chemistry experiment. It could be a scene from any school laboratory around the world, but until two months ago Amadu and his fellow students had no access to any science equipment. Science subjects at his rural secondary school outside the city of Katsina in northern Nigeria were taught using theory only. But now they have all the kit they need to put theory into practice, thanks to a mobile science lab that tours selected state schools. "It's an exciting experience. We were being taught only the theoretical aspect of science subjects," Amadu, who wants to...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/07/17)
CAPE TOWN (Reuters) - Ride-hailing service Uber Technologies Inc. [UBER.UL] is growing rapidly in sub-Saharan Africa and considering moves into more markets, despite sometimes violent opposition from metered taxi drivers, a senior executive said on Tuesday. Uber’s service has triggered protests by rivals from London to New Delhi as it up-ends traditional business models that require professional drivers to pay steep licensing fees to do business. “We are bullish on Africa. The growth here is still substantial and we think that given the right regulatory environment, the growth could be even better,” Justin Spratt, head of business development for the sub-Saharan region, told Reuters. “Africa’s growth thus far has been faster than America and a large part of that is...
(Reuters (Eng) 11/06/17)
JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Africa’s mobile internet connections are set to double in the next five years, a study showed on Monday, thanks to affordable smartphones and the roll-out of high-speed networks. A report by research and consulting firm Ovum in London estimates that mobile broadband connections will rise from 419 million at the end of this year to 1.07 billion by the end of 2022. “Data connectivity is growing strongly in Africa, and there are also good prospects on the continent in areas such as digital media, mobile financial services, and the Internet of Things,” said Matthew Reed, Practice Leader Middle East and Africa at Ovum. “But as Africa’s TMT market becomes more convergent and complex, service providers are under...
(AFP (eng) 11/04/17)
Tanzanian marathon runner Ismael Juma died on Thursday when his motorbike collided with a lorry, Athletics Tanzania (AT) announced on Friday. The 26-year-old was one of Tanzania's hopes for a medal at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia in April. "Tanzania athletics has lost one of its top long distance runners," AT secretary general Wilhelm Gidabuday told AFP. "Ismail Juma was one of 19 athletes selected to start training later this month for the Commonwealth Games in Australia." Gidabuday said Juma was heading to the northern town of Arusha when his bike was involved in a head-on collision with a truck. He died at the scene. The runner was expected to compete in the New Delhi half marathon on...
(AFP (eng) 11/03/17)
US politicians are voicing concern over America's growing military presence across Africa, where they worry the Pentagon is getting ever more embroiled in a secretive campaign against a shifting enemy. Last month's killing of four US soldiers in a Niger ambush has thrust the issue into the spotlight, with lawmakers calling for greater transparency on what is going on in Africa. "The footprint in Africa is much bigger than the American public understands," Democratic Senator Tim Kaine said this week. The Niger ambush has also rekindled debate over the legal authorities the Pentagon uses to fight jihadist groups overseas, particularly in Africa where about 6,000 US troops are deployed across the vast continent. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis this week faced...
(Xinhuanet 10/31/17)
Tanzania's newly appointed Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism Hamisi Kigwangalla said on Monday the east African nation's anti-poaching drive will now focus on the arrest of ringleaders and dismantling of poaching syndicates instead of seizure of ivory. "The government will use intelligence to arrest poaching ringleaders," he said in the country's political capital, Dodoma. He said the government is investigating a huge poaching syndicate. Kigwangalla said a hardcore poacher was arrested in Meatu district in Shinyanga region on Sunday as he was planning to kill a rhino in the Setrengeti National Park. "The poacher was arrested in possession of 356 rounds of ammunition, two magazines and two saws," the minister said. In May, former Minister for Natural Resources and...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/31/17)
DAR ES SALAAM (Reuters) - A senior Tanzanian politician quit the ruling party on Monday complaining of human rights abuses and a weakening of democracy in the east African nation, in a move political analysts said could trigger a wave of defections to opposition parties. Since taking office in late 2015, President John Magufuli has introduced sweeping reforms, including as an anti-corruption drive that has won him some praise from Western donors. But his administration is also increasingly being accused by his opponents of undermining democracy by curbing dissent and stifling free speech, including banning newspapers. On Monday, Lazaro Nyalandu, who once served as a cabinet minister and has been a member of parliament for the ruling Chama Cha Mapinduzi...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/31/17)
HARARE (Reuters) - Economic growth is expected to rise to 3.4 percent in sub-Saharan Africa next year from 2.6 percent in 2017, the IMF said in a report on Monday, but warned that rising debt and political risks in larger economies would weigh down future growth. Nigeria and South African are the biggest economies in Africa south of the Sahara, but both nations have been clouded by political uncertainty linked to the tenure of their leaders. The IMF said a good harvest and recovery in oil output in Nigeria would contribute more than half of the growth in the region this year while an uptick in mining and a better harvest in South Africa as well as a rebound in...
(AFP (eng) 10/30/17)
Tanzania has deported three South African lawyers arrested last week for "promoting homosexuality", their organisation said in a statement. The Initiative for Strategic Litigation (ISLA) in Africa said that the three had been "deported earlier this evening", in the statement dated Friday. The lawyers were amongst a group of 13 people, including a Ugandan and Tanzanians, who were arrested last Tuesday at the Peacock hotel in Dar es Salaam. Local police chief Lazaro Mambosasa said they had been "promoting homosexuality".
(AFP (eng) 10/24/17)
Elephant poaching in Africa declined for a fifth straight year in 2016 but seizures of illegal ivory hit records highs, the CITES monitor said Tuesday, calling it a "conflicting phenomena". In its latest report, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species also noted that despite the overall fall in poaching, Africa's elephant population has continued to drop "due to continued illegal killing, land transformation and rapid human expansion." Global illegal ivory trade has remained relatively stable for six years, CITES reported. But 2016 saw a full 40 tonnes of illegal ivory seized, the most since 1989, as well as the hightest-ever number of "large-scale ivory seizures", the group said. "The overall weight of seized ivory in illegal trade is...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/23/17)
DAR ES SALAAM (Reuters) - Tanzania’s new central bank governor will be tax law professor Florens Luoga, the country’s president said on Monday. President John Magufuli said Luoga would take over in December or January after the tenure of current governor Benno Ndulu expires. “I have decided to appoint a new (central bank) governor from among members of the committees that investigated the mining sector,” Magufuli said. He was speaking at a ceremony to award certificates of recognition to members of two presidential committees that investigated allegations of tax evasion in exports of gold and copper concentrate in the east African country. Luoga currently serves as the deputy vice chancellor of the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM), the country’s...
(AFP (eng) 10/23/17)
Senior leaders of the Popular Forces of Burundi (FPB) rebel group were arrested in eastern Tanzania on Saturday and extradited to Burundi the following day, the FPB said Monday. "Four FPB leaders, including the number 1 and 2, Jeremie Ntiranyibagira and Edouard Nshimirimana, were arrested in Ngara on October 21 by security forces from Tanzania and Burundi," it said in a statement. "On October 22, they underwent an irregular extradition to Burundi, where their lives are in danger," it said, giving no further details. The statement was authenticated as genuine by several senior figures in the FPB...
(Reuters (Eng) 10/23/17)
DAKAR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - African political leaders, activists, and local chiefs joined forces on Monday to commit to ending child marriage in West and Central Africa, the region with the highest child marriage rate in the world. More than a third of girls in the region are married under the age of 18, with the rate over 50 percent in six countries and up to 76 percent in Niger. Driven by factors including poverty, insecurity and religious tradition, marrying off girls once they reach puberty or even before is a deeply engrained social custom in much of West and Central Africa. The practice hampers global efforts to reduce poverty and population growth and has negative impacts on women’s and...
(AFP (eng) 10/21/17)
The killing of four American special operations soldiers in Niger has highlighted the increasing role elite units are playing across Africa, which is rapidly becoming a major center of US military action. Their mission is to counter the advances of a slew of jihadist movements across the continent, including Al-Shabaab in Somalia, affiliates of the Islamic State group in the Sahel region and Boko Haram in Nigeria. Of the 8,000 special forces "operators" deployed globally this year, more than 1,300 are in Africa, according to officials from the US Special Operations Command (SOCOM), which is based in Tampa, Florida. Another 5,000 or so are in the Middle East. In five years, the number of US commandos in Africa has tripled...

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