Saturday 21 October 2017
(AFP (eng) 07/05/17)
A female Tanzanian MP has been arrested for allegedly insulting President John Magufuli, who is seen as increasingly authoritarian and unwilling to brook any dissent. The outspoken lawmaker, Halima Mdee, 39, from the main opposition Chadema party, was arrested on Tuesday, a day after she held a press conference slamming Magufuli for saying teen mothers should be barred from school. "She is accused of insulting president Magufuli," fellow lawmaker Said Kubenea said Wednesday. "This is all part of a campaign to crush any criticism (of the authorities)." At her press conference, Mdee questioned the "competency" of the president, who swept to power in 2015 as a no-nonsense, corruption-busting man of the people but has drawn criticism for an authoritarian streak...
(Reuters (Eng) 07/04/17)
Acacia Mining on Tuesday said it was seeking an adjudicator to resolve its dispute with the Tanzanian government, a day after the east-African country passed two laws to force companies to re-negotiate their contracts. Tanzania's President John Magufuli has sent shock-waves through the mining community with a series of actions since his election in 2015 that he says are to distribute revenue to the Tanzanian people. Speaking at a televised public rally in northwest Tanzania on Tuesday, Magufuli said he had decided to rush...
(Voice of America 07/04/17)
GENEVA — The U.N. children’s fund warns tens of thousands of malnourished children are at great risk in Yemen, Somalia and South Sudan, which are on the brink of famine. UNICEF reports an estimated 4.7 million children in the cholera-stricken countries are malnourished. Of these, UNICEF spokesman Christofe Boulierac tells VOA, more than one million are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. “Let me remind you that a child who is suffering from severe acute malnutrition are nine times more likely to die of disease than a well-nourished child," he said. "So, having cholera and diarrhea in countries where so many children are so fragile because of malnutrition among other things because of such a bad access to safe water is...
(RFI(EN) 07/04/17)
New tax rules in Israel could leave hundreds of African migrants worse off than they are. In May, the government introduced a new deposit law, enabling the governemnt to take 20 percent of migrants' salaries each month and place it out of reach. The money can only be accessed once they leave the country. Rights groups say the policy is designed to force them out of the country. "We're not pressuring you to leave but will make your life miserable so you decide to leave," Anwar Suliman, a Darfuri refugee living in Israel since 2008, told RFI . "Every time the state makes a different law, different pressure, but we said we can't go back right now." Suliman fled Darfur...
(AFP (eng) 07/03/17)
Tanzania and Zimbabwe shook off the weariness of playing four times within a week to reach the COSAFA Cup southern Africa championship semi-finals Sunday. An early goal from Elias Maguri gave Tanzania a 1-0 victory over title-holders and hosts South Africa in the first half of a quarter-finals double-header in northwest township Phokeng. A Knox Mutizwa header in the closing stages took four-time champions Zimbabwe through as they edged Swaziland 2-1 at Royal Bafokeng Sports Palace in a thriller. Tanzania play Zambia and Lesotho face Zimbabwe in the semi-finals this Wednesday at nearby Moruleng Stadium in the South African platinum mining belt. Zambia beat Botswana 2-1 and Lesotho won 5-4 on penalties against Namibia after a 0-0 draw in the...
(AFP (eng) 06/29/17)
Tanzanian football chief Jamal Malinzi was on Thursday charged with embezzlement for falsifying invoices to pocket cash given by sponsors, court documents showed. Malinzi, who was arrested Wednesday, was charged alongside the Tanzanian Football Federation (TFF) secretary general Celestine Mwesigwa. Malinzi became head of the TFF in 2013 and is up for re-election in August. Both men pleaded not guilty to the charge and will re-appear in court on July 3. In a separate case, the president and vice-president of the Simba football club, one of the oldest and most successful in the country, were charged with money laundering. Details of the charge will only be given upon their next court appearance on July 13.
(AFP (eng) 06/28/17)
Tanzania's President John Magufuli plans to speed up the building of a hydroelectric dam in one of Africa's largest game reserves, despite criticism from environmentalists and UNESCO. The long-planned dam in the Selous Game Reserve, already listed as a UNESCO world heritage site in danger, could provide 2,100 megawatts of power to a country where only two percent of rural people and 39 percent of urbanites have access to electricity, according to UN figures. In a presidency statement issued Tuesday, Magufuli called for "the dam to be built as quickly as possible ... so that we can produce electricity which is vital to industrialisation." Experts from Ethiopia, which last year unveiled its own hydroelectric dam aimed at doubling its electricity...
(AFP (eng) 06/28/17)
The generic version of the most advanced drug against HIV has been introduced in Kenya, a first in Africa where more than 25 million have the disease, the NGO Unitaid said Wednesday. The drug, Dolutegravir (DTG) is the anti-retroviral drug of choice for those living with HIV in developed countries, but its high price has put it out of reach for most struggling with the disease in Africa. "The generic DTG has two advantages: on the one hand, it is very good from a pharmaceutical point of view. On the other hand, it is much cheaper," said Robert Matiru of Unitaid, which works to reduce the costs of medicines treating AIDS, tuberculosis or malaria. He described the drug as "the...
(AFP (eng) 06/26/17)
Tanzania has threatened to arrest and deport those campaigning for gay rights and de-register organisations protecting homosexual interests, local media reported Monday. "I would like to remind and warn all organisations and institutions that campaign and pretend to protect homosexual interests ... we are going to arrest whoever is involved and charge them in courts of law," the state-owned Daily News quoted Interior Minister Mwigulu Nchemba as saying. In the country's latest attack on its homosexual community, Nchemba also said foreigners involved in such campaigns would be "deported within no time ... they will not have even the time to unplug their mobile phones from the socket."
(AFP (eng) 06/23/17)
Tanzania President John Magufuli said students who become pregnant should not be allowed to finish their studies after giving birth, sparking outrage from women's rights campaign groups. "I give money for a student to study for free. And then, she gets pregnant, gives birth and after that, returns to school. No, not under my mandate," the president said Thursday while visiting Chalinze, around 100 kilometres (62 miles) west of the economic capital Dar es Salaam.
(Reuters (Eng) 06/23/17)
DAR ES SALAAM (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Sadick Thenest remembers how his 8-year-old daughter had a narrow brush with death two years ago, when she contracted cholera after drinking contaminated water. “She was so gaunt, weak and had terrible diarrhea,” said the refugee from Burundi. “A slight delay in rushing her to hospital would have meant something else - but with God’s grace she survived.” The father of four, aged 35, is among thousands of refugees grappling with frequent outbreaks of waterborne diseases in the crowded Nyarugusu camp in western Tanzania, due to poor sanitation. “Living in a refugee camp is a constant struggle. You either stick to health rules or contract diseases,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by...
(AFP (eng) 06/21/17)
Two police officers were shot dead in eastern Tanzania on Wednesday, the latest in a series of attacks against local officials and security officers, state television reported. The killing by unknown assailants happened in the Kibiti region where 11 police officers have been slain since March. The murders, and uncertainty over the motive, have spread fear throughout local government in the region. "Two road security police officers were shot dead during the day", the state-owned Tanzania Broadcasting corporation (TBC) reported. A local official told AFP on Wednesday, "According to the information we have, it was in broad daylight".
(Voice of America 06/21/17)
WASHINGTON DC — On June 5, Saudi Arabia and its allies, including Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, cut diplomatic ties with Qatar, accusing it of funding extremist groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood and Islamic State. In response, Qatar said it was the victim of a policy of “domination and control” by its larger neighbor and that Saudi Arabia was, in fact, the one responsible for backing extremism. So what is the truth? Fundamentalist strains of Islam, including Saudi-born Salafism and Wahhabism, form the ideological bedrock for most terror groups. According to a study by Leif Wenar of King’s College London based on the Global Terrorism Database, three out of four terror attacks in the last 10 years...
(AFP (eng) 06/20/17)
Two Tanzanian energy magnates on Monday became the first big industrialists to be charged over a multi-million-dollar graft scandal that led to the sacking of several top officials three years ago. A 2014 audit created an uproar after showing fraudulent payment of some $120 million (107 million euros) in state funds to an independent power producing company, prompting several foreign donors to halt aid to Tanzania. James Rugemalira and Harbinder Singh Seth, who were charged Monday with economic crimes, were co-owners of the Independent Power Tanzania Limited (IPTL) power company which had a contract to supply electricity to the state-owned energy provider Tanesco. Tanesco and IPTL had created a joint escrow account from which payments were siphoned off to a...
(Reuters (Eng) 06/20/17)
The U.S. Trade Representative said on Tuesday it was reviewing trade benefits to Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) after a complaint over a ban on imports of used clothing into the East African market. USTR said the "out-of-cycle" review was in response to a petition filed by the Secondary Materials and Recycled Textiles Association (SMART), which complained that the ban "imposed significant hardship" on the U.S. used-clothing industry. "Through the out-of-cycle review, USTR and trade-related agencies will assess the allegations contained within the SMART petition and review whether Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda are adhering to AGOA's eligibility requirements," USTR said in a statement. (Reporting by Lesley Wroughton; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe)
(AFP (eng) 06/16/17)
Tanzanian weekly, Mawio, has been ordered to suspend publication for two years after pointing the finger at two former presidents in connection with huge revenue losses, the country's interior ministry said Friday. The weekly, regularly critical of the government, was suspended after it published front page pictures of former presidents Jakaya Kikwete (2005-2015) and Benjamin Mkapa (1995-2005) on Thursday, linking them with dubious mining contracts. On Wednesday, President John Magufuli had threatened "severe measures" against any media that suggested Kikwete and Mkapa might be involved in signing contracts that were disadvantage to the state. Justice Minister Palamagamba Kabudi pointed out that the former heads of state enjoyed immunity from prosecution over events occurring during their mandates. Mawio went on to...
(AFP (eng) 06/14/17)
Tanzania has agreed to negotiations with Canadian mining giant Barrick Gold which it accuses of operating illegally and evading taxes, a government statement said Wednesday. Barrick is the majority shareholder in London-listed Acacia Mining which a presidential commission report said this week was not registered to operate in Tanzania and had failed to pay taxes worth billions of dollars. Barrick refuted the allegations. On Wednesday, its executive chairman John Thornton flew to Tanzania to meet with President John Magufuli after news of the allegations caused the company's share price to fall. Barrick "is ready to discuss with the Tanzanian government the reimbursement of money lost by Tanzania as a result of the company's operations in the country," the presidency said...
(AFP (eng) 06/14/17)
Extortion, corruption and fear; violence, hunger and sometimes even death: for west African migrants dreaming of reaching Europe, the road to get there can be an absolute minefield. - Departure - Whether it's The Gambia, Ivory Coast, Senegal or Nigeria, everything starts with the "hustlers" -- slang for the middlemen or fixers who organise the trip. Their honesty and prices vary, with the would-be migrant usually deceived about the welcome expected in Europe. Many possess no official documents from their home country, and do not understand illegal status in Europe. Most are ignorant about the extreme difficulties they will encounter en route. "We didn't know we were risking our lives," said Kante Sekou...
(AFP (eng) 06/14/17)
Maria gave smugglers all her family savings and crossed three countries and the searing Libyan desert, but when she finally boarded a boat for Europe her dream was swiftly shattered. She was 24 and pregnant with her second child when she left Liberia with her husband and their three-year-old son. The family passed through Guinea and Mali before crossing southern Algeria to reach the Libyan desert. "The smugglers took all our money" -- more than $2,150 (2,000 euros), she said. "We spent four days in the desert. People died of thirst and the sun in the back of the truck." They finally arrived on the beach at Sabrata, 70 kilometres (45 miles) west of Libya's capital Tripoli, a key departure...
(AFP (eng) 06/13/17)
Fraud in the mining sector since 1998 has cost Tanzania 75 billion euros ($84 billion), an investigating commission said Monday, blaming foreign companies failing to declare revenues. The conclusions of the study, conducted by Tanzanian economists and legal experts and seen by AFP, were approved by President John Magufuli. The report attributed much of the loss to foreign companies, including mining giant Acacia Mining, also accused of operating for several years in the country without being registered. The London-listed company immediately rejected the claims. Magufuli, referring...

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